Definition of zone in English:

zone

noun

  • 1An area or stretch of land having a particular characteristic, purpose, or use, or subject to particular restrictions.

    ‘a pedestrian zone’
    ‘a 40-km demilitarized zone’
    figurative ‘United are still in the relegation zone’
    • ‘The proposed enclosure would stretch from wet sand to dry areas above the tidal zone, but allowed people to walk at the water's edge along the beach.’
    • ‘Thousands of landmines have made patches of the fertile land into no-go zones.’
    • ‘But once inside this military zone the atmosphere is more relaxed and you are able to walk around freely.’
    • ‘Last year in those zones an astonishing 166,430 visitor permits were issued.’
    • ‘The village has been divided into different zones and athletes will have a colour-coded map to help them get around.’
    • ‘Once in the security zone you can see some of the damage caused by the bombing.’
    • ‘Essex Police said the incident had taken place in the main passenger terminal building, near check-in zones E and F, at around 9.40 am today.’
    • ‘Though it was in the mandatory evacuation zone, fire officials decided removing the animals would be "a logistical nightmare," said the vice president of operations.’
    • ‘A small strip of land, the demilitarized zone, separates the two sides.’
    • ‘The area in question has now been declared a disaster zone, and provincial funding has been requested to help the afflicted fishermen.’
    • ‘A large number come from disrupted family backgrounds, economically or socially deprived families or are children who come from conflict zones themselves.’
    • ‘The chain wants to convert the ground floor to what they describe as a traditional ale house and wine bar, with no-smoking zones and a family area.’
    • ‘Heslington gained their first win of the season and moved out of the relegation zone when they beat Londesbrough Park by seven wickets.’
    • ‘It wants to split the area into parking zones at each end and introduce a road traffic order in the middle to safeguard the loading bay with a larger sign.’
    • ‘He had never had a formal driving lesson and was spotted by witnesses doing up to 90 mph in a 30 mph zone minutes before the crash.’
    • ‘A buffer zone is recommended in which no irrigating is done.’
    • ‘Heavy rains are expected in the earthquake zone this weekend.’
    • ‘More than 100,000 people were belatedly evacuated from the zone following the disaster.’
    • ‘The Courthouse car park would be improved, and a pedestrian zone created at the front entrance.’
    • ‘We had a very large clump of cedar trees just in the fire zone itself.’
    area, sector, section, belt, region, territory, tract, stretch, expanse, district, quarter, precinct, locality, neighbourhood, province, land
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Geography
      A well-defined region extending around the earth between definite limits, especially between two parallels of latitude.
      ‘a zone of easterly winds’
      • ‘Summers in this climatic zone are warm, rainy and uncomfortably humid.’
      • ‘Located in the temperate monsoon zone, Japan is also strongly influenced by seasonal weather patterns.’
      • ‘The eastern Himalayan region is a high-rainfall zone that yields excessive water in basins during the monsoon.’
      • ‘This diagram is the same as the one above except that the major pressure and wind zones have been replaced by a typical isobaric weather map.’
      • ‘The Atlantic zone receives trade winds and has high rainfall year-round.’
    2. 1.2A range of longitudes where a common standard time is used.
      • ‘Smith said the time zone would be attractive to broadcasters, who could schedule games in different timeslots.’
      • ‘Mars will be closest to Earth in 2005 on October 29 or 30, depending on your time zone.’
      • ‘It was after seven, but Vancouver was in the same time zone, so I called Frank at home.’
      • ‘As I turn back towards home, my mobile phone beeps into life. A new year greeting sent from a different time zone, halfway across the world.’
      • ‘‘If we can't run two offices in different locations in the same time zone then we have big problems,’ he said.’
      • ‘We're four miles inside of the central time zone here, in south central Tennessee just north of the Georgia, Alabama border.’
      • ‘Fortunately, whether your child is starting school in a new time zone or just down the street, you can help smooth the way.’
      • ‘As for jet lag, if you have the luxury, one treatment is to slowly change your awake and sleep times to fit the new time zone.’
      • ‘If you take melatonin too early in the day, you may become sleepy before bedtime and it may take you longer to adapt to your new time zone.’
      • ‘With the last race having been in Malaysia, and the next in Australia, there's plenty to be said for staying out and getting used to the time zone.’
      • ‘It's hard to live with someone in a different time zone, so I converted for the sake of the relationship.’
      • ‘If you're serious and plan quite a few early mornings, adjust your sleep schedule the same way you adjust to a new time zone.’
      • ‘Go and look at a map - Portugal is actually, if anything, below and to the left of most of Britain, so it makes complete sense that they are in the same time zone.’
      • ‘Every eight hours, the results of the day's work are forwarded to the team in the next time zone, from Japan to Germany to the USA and back to Japan.’
      • ‘For instance, if you travel to Dallas, the watch will pick up signals from the Dallas radio station and reset itself for the appropriate time zone.’
      • ‘The comet was struck on July forth for the Eastern and Central time zones, but it hit on the third for us in the Rockies and the Western time zone.’
      • ‘The fact that this World Cup is basically being played in our time zone means most soccer fans are able to see a lot more of this event and understand how big it is.’
      • ‘Also, those of us with satellite dishes can watch a different time zone.’
      • ‘I'm not sure when the time zone changes, so I'll have to figure that out.’
      • ‘The staging of the World Cup in a different time zone had an adverse effect on newspaper sales, with Sunday papers hit hardest of all.’
    3. 1.3informal (especially in sport) a state of such concentration that one is able to perform at the peak of one's physical or mental capabilities.
      ‘I was in the zone, completing the first nine holes in one under par’
  • 2Botany Zoology
    An encircling band or stripe of distinctive colour, texture, or character.

    • ‘‘Palmate’ sclerites are situated in the dorsal zone of the animal's body.’
    • ‘In addition, plants that are colonized by mycorrhizal fungi have a zone termed the mycorrhizosphere.’
    • ‘As the root grows following seed germination, the stomatal zone overlaps with that of the root hairs.’
    • ‘Like modern frogs, she says, the bones show an inner zone of yellow, fatty marrow, encircled by an outer zone of red marrow.’
    • ‘In the cambial zone, at least three patterns of cell differentiation can be distinguished.’
    • ‘The basement membrane zone divides the epidermis from the dermis.’
  • 3archaic A belt or girdle worn round a person's body.

    girdle, sash, strap, cummerbund, waistband, band, girth
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Divide into or assign to zones.

    1. 1.1Divide (a town or piece of land) into areas subject to particular planning restrictions.
      ‘an experimental system of zoning’
      • ‘Clearly, communities will need to move decisively to change zoning laws and building codes, in order to avoid a repeat of what we have seen.’
      • ‘Clint Eastwood ran for mayor on a platform that promised to prune back the plethora of local rules, regulations, building restrictions and zoning laws.’
      • ‘He said a further application would require a material contravention to give zoning authority and added he was surprised by the refusal.’
      • ‘Cllr Flynn says while Westport Town Councillors won't be zoning this particular piece of land they will be making their opinions felt.’
      • ‘The list included concerns voiced by the town planners and architects on land use zoning and floor area ratio.’
      • ‘The move was made to restrict zoning, said Stevens, in order to avoid having a retail store set up where it was unwanted.’
      • ‘The 140 acres proposed for zoning also includes land adjacent to the Tullamore Road and Brittas Avenue.’
      • ‘However, it was explained at last week's meeting that this figure was arrived at due to current zoning regulations.’
      • ‘Ms McEvoy said zoning in small villages and towns was essential to ensure controlled, structured and sustainable development.’
      • ‘For new construction, this can be of vital importance, particularly where zoning restricts building height.’
      • ‘First, consider the principle that time, place, and manner restrictions such as zoning generally do not violate the First Amendment.’
      • ‘All the indications are that Cherrywood will receive the town centre zoning.’
      • ‘The local zoning authorities for a long time just outright banned big box stores, stores of over something like 10,000 square feet.’
      • ‘Check local regulations and zoning restrictions because some areas may have legally established separation distances.’
      • ‘Stiff zoning laws, even when they're well-intended, result in unintended consequences.’
      • ‘I'm sure any zoning plan will be a small sacrifice for the recreational angler to make for the future sustainability of our fish stocks.’
      • ‘The company will even lobby local government to change zoning regulations in order to get the location they want.’
      • ‘Prescott says he is listening, and, because the urban plan covers zoning bylaws, input can make a difference.’
      • ‘Pay particular attention to zoning in each of the alternatives proposed for your area.’
      • ‘There are no regulations, zoning restrictions, fences or white lines to tell you where to go.’
    2. 1.2Designate (a specific area) for use or development as a particular zone in planning.
      ‘the land is zoned for housing’
      • ‘If it zones something for a particular use and nobody wants it, then nothing happens.’
      • ‘Only the 1,000 square feet now operating is zoned for that use.’
      • ‘The property is zoned for residential and part commercial use and is located beside The Elms and Braganza housing estates in Carlow town.’
      • ‘The canal area is zoned for new homes and restaurants, and some redundant cotton mills are being converted into flats.’
      • ‘The Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority claims the cowboys were illegally using the former warehouse as a stable, a use it wasn't zoned for.’
      • ‘The owners have now had a change of mind and efforts are being made to lease the 8,000 sq. ft property, which is zoned for retail use.’
      • ‘The premises and grounds are zoned for industrial use.’
      • ‘The remaining 12 acres are zoned for agriculture.’
      • ‘The council has been called on to increase its commercial rates income by zoning land just outside of the city boundary for commercial development.’
      • ‘The Railway Square site is zoned for general business under the 2002 Waterford City Development Plan.’
      • ‘There is land zoned for industry, so the sooner the County Council purchases this land the better.’
      • ‘Listowel town manager Michael McMahon asked councillors to consider zoning a portion of land for the use of discount retailers.’
      • ‘The new centre would be zoned for mixed use to allow residential, retail, educational and community facilities such as a health centre, hotel, restaurants, bars and a post office.’
      • ‘Local authorities could then zone it and then sell it on.’
      • ‘Since the building is now zoned for residential use, the house can be occupied by only three unrelated people at a time.’
      • ‘But much of the land is former industrial space that couldn't be recycled for new uses without government approval because it is still zoned for manufacturing.’
      • ‘Of course, that designation would be vulnerable to manipulation (the airport is currently zoned as parkland, though it is of course not being used as such).’
      • ‘The purpose of the proposed variation is to zone lands in Tullow and its environs to use for residential, institutional and industrial uses.’
      • ‘The owners were hard done by following the council decision to zone the land as green area.’
      • ‘The land was zoned at that time for agricultural purposes.’
  • 2archaic Encircle as or with a band or stripe.

    • ‘The southeastern horizon is zoned with a mellow uniform band of light.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • zone out

    • Fall asleep or lose concentration or consciousness.

      ‘I just zoned out for a moment’
      • ‘I was zoning out a little from the heat but Jill Sobule's set brought me right back to earth.’
      • ‘Do they zone out in church and only catch half the sermon or what?’
      • ‘Liz was already sitting there, front row centre among the geeks, yet she seemed to have, once again, zoned out and fallen asleep.’
      • ‘You've been zoning out all day long, what's the problem?’
      • ‘Just zoning out in a bath from 20 minutes to an hour can be a wonderful home-spa experience all by itself, relaxing and private.’
      • ‘It is not the sort of cd I could listen to and just zone out to.’
      • ‘He sings Otis Redding's ‘Try a Little Tenderness’ and it's so boring I zone out and my eyeballs fall out.’
      • ‘This does more harm than good, as we tend to lose the thread and zone out.’
      • ‘In between I collapse back onto the pillow, eyes closed and completely zone out while I wait for the next one.’
      • ‘We had been studying logarithms, and I had been zoning out.’
      fall asleep, go to sleep, drop off
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from French, or from Latin zona girdle, from Greek zōnē.

Pronunciation:

zone

/zəʊn/