Definition of zip in English:

zip

verb

  • 1with object Fasten with a zip.

    ‘he zipped up his waterproof’
    • ‘Sofia was wearing a brown leather jacket, which was already zipped up as much as possible.’
    • ‘She shivered and zipped up her hooded sweatshirt.’
    • ‘He was wearing a black ski-type waterproof jacket which was bulky and was zipped up to the neck and possibly had a hood.’
    • ‘He was wearing dark blue jeans, Timberland black boots and a white long-sleeved top that was zipped up.’
    • ‘However they imagined this end, I cannot help but seeing an image of a body bag being zipped up.’
    • ‘Liz stood at the door in gray sweatpants and a black jacket that was zipped up.’
    • ‘I zipped up my purse and leaned against the wall.’
    • ‘She smiles and zips up her jacket. ‘Which is just how it should be.’’
    • ‘She finished her hasty packing and zipped up the bag.’
    • ‘The jacket was zipped up and the pants were ironed straight.’
    • ‘Having grabbed all the books she needed for the weekend, Melanie shut her locker door, zipped up her backpack, and swung it over her shoulder.’
    • ‘I quickly zipped up my jacket and walked away from Jason.’
    • ‘His black bomber jacket was zipped up to the neck and he also wore black jeans and black boots or shoes.’
    • ‘He was wearing a waist-length light to mid-grey polyester jacket, zipped up at the front, and dark sandy-coloured corduroys.’
    • ‘Keep your bag zipped up and make sure your wallet or purse can't be seen.’
    • ‘Jennifer zipped up the sides of her boots, and clipped her belt together.’
    • ‘I inhaled the smell of old perfume and talcum powder every time I helped zip her dress.’
    • ‘Todd was behind us, zipping his pants and calling out Brooklyn's name.’
    • ‘I pulled out three dollars and zipped my purse.’
    • ‘His black jacket was zipped up despite the heat of the night and his hands were in his pockets.’
    1. 1.1 Fasten the zip of a garment that (someone) is wearing.
      ‘he zipped himself up’
      • ‘She grabbed the zipper and quickly zipped me up.’
      • ‘He was over in a flash, zipped her up, helped her on with her coat: a complete gentleman.’
      • ‘‘Shut up and slip into the dress, so I can zip you up’ Kirk said coolly.’
      • ‘I felt his fingertips brush my skin lightly as he zipped me carefully up.’
      • ‘I tried not to sound insecure as she zipped me up.’
      • ‘The second Phil zipped me in, I could feel this very uncomfortable pressure in my inner right elbow every time I bent the arm.’
      • ‘We zipped Jack into his drysuit, found his weightbelt, helped him into his borrowed BC and watched him do his buddy-check.’
      • ‘He turns without thinking to the one following him to ask him to zip him back up in again, realizing with horror after a moment exactly what this must forebode.’
      • ‘Four people eventually managed to zip him into it and he emerged belatedly into the limelight still rippling from his previous endeavour.’
      • ‘She sighs and zips me into my costume with a quick tug.’
      • ‘We consciously closed the door, I got into the suitcase, and she zipped me up.’
      • ‘I needed two aunts to zip me into my senior prom dress.’
      • ‘I zipped him up inside my comfy top thing so that his head was poking out from just under my chin, and I set about cooking dinner.’
  • 2informal no object, with adverbial of direction Move at high speed.

    ‘swallows zipped back and forth across the lake’
    • ‘It's a public holiday today, so we zipped up the M4 in record time, I parked near Stamford Bridge, and we walked round to Earls Court from there.’
    • ‘April opened up her locker to stuff her book bag and zip home on her roller blades.’
    • ‘The magnesium catches fire and zips around on the surface of the water.’
    • ‘The musical numbers are by far the most frenetic, with animated imagery zipping around at the speed of hyperspace.’
    • ‘James is a tireless runner who can punish a defense with his strength or zip through it with his speed.’
    • ‘It made 11 hours in economy class on the London to Bangkok flight zip by in a dreamy fug.’
    • ‘Where are the predictions of the near future in which we all zip about above the rooftops in our own little aircars?’
    • ‘Under the assured direction of veteran Leo McCarey, the film just zips along and is all over far too soon.’
    • ‘Brooks, a war correspondent, has obviously done her homework, and her first novel zips along entertainingly, filled with incident and detail.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, as with any circuit, you'll zip from one move to the next without resting, keeping your heart rate - and calorie burn - high.’
    • ‘Robben, again from the right, zips inside and coaxes a curler about four yards of the far post.’
    • ‘Normally I push the speed limit, and the countryside zips by.’
    • ‘Khair moves with effortless ease into his story-telling: we are quickly introduced to the characters as the novel zips along.’
    • ‘The evening consists of four creative and varied works that made the time zip by.’
    • ‘It was Smith again who pressurised Dunfermline, this time turning inside from he left and keeping his shot low but it zipped just past the post.’
    • ‘I literally feel life zip by me while I stand rooted.’
    • ‘Drifts of sea pinks coloured the soft grass of the cliff tops and house martins zipped by flashing their pure white rumps.’
    • ‘Instead of high drama in slow motion, this is low drama and high speed as the cars zip by.’
    • ‘Everybody zips along at the same frantic speed, the assumption being that you know where you're going.’
    • ‘Day over, then I could just zip home and zip straight onto the computer where I could just lock myself away from the outside world.’
    hurry, race, run, sprint, dash, bolt, dart, rush, hasten, hurtle, career, streak, shoot, whizz, zoom, go like lightning, go hell for leather, spank along, bowl along, rattle along, whirl, whoosh, buzz, swoop, flash, blast, charge, stampede, gallop, sweep, hare, fly, wing, scurry, scud, scutter, scramble
    speed, hurry, race, run, sprint, dash, bolt, dart, rush, hasten, hurtle, career, streak, shoot, whizz, zoom, go like lightning, go hell for leather, spank along, bowl along, rattle along, whirl, whoosh, buzz, swoop, flash, blast, charge, stampede, gallop, sweep, hare, fly, wing, scurry, scud, scutter, scramble
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1with object and adverbial Cause to move or be delivered or dealt with rapidly.
      ‘he zipped a pass out to his receiver’
      • ‘First, Ginobili drove the lane and drew Duncan's defender, zipping a pass to Duncan all alone on the baseline for a 19-footer.’
      • ‘Stealing in on the blindside of the lax Killie defence to gather a cross-field delivery, he zipped an unstoppable shot into the far corner.’
      • ‘Finally, he zips a pass to me, a pass that would have been perfect if 1 were 6-6 but instead goes sailing just over my fingertips and out of bounds.’
      • ‘Crouch zipped a pass to Wistrom, who caught it, turned upfield and was tackled at the 15.’
      • ‘Carr zipped a perfect pass to a wide-open Johnson, who dropped the easy catch that would have given Houston another third down conversion.’
      • ‘You slide the envelope through the slot, and a little motor kicks in, grabbing the envelope and zipping it through, while popping out a spinning blade to slice off just the tiniest bit of the top of the envelope.’
      • ‘Against the Kings, Yao zipped a no-look scoop pass across the court to PG Steve Francis.’
      • ‘Flushed from the pocket by Tigers pressure, Hagans roamed the field for nearly 5 seconds before zipping a 25-yard pass to wideout Deyon Williams.’
  • 3Computing
    Compress (a file) so that it takes less space in storage.

    • ‘Like the smaller test, we'll be zipping the images into one zip file, then testing again with all the files separate.’
    • ‘We zipped it up to compress it so that your virus protection software would allow you to receive it’
    • ‘We also zipped the folder, reducing it to about 640MB for our large file tests.’
    • ‘The Trojan arrives in an e-mail with an attachment that is zipped and contains an executable.’
    • ‘The standard way around this is to zip the executable files before sending them.’

noun

  • 1British A device consisting of two flexible strips of metal or plastic with interlocking projections closed or opened by pulling a slide along them, used to fasten garments, bags, and other items.

    Also called zipper
    • ‘Simple in design, this is a great little deep neck top with a half length zip and zipped pocket at the chest for storing bus passes.’
    • ‘The garment is manufactured using a hardwearing, fire resistant fabric that incorporates a two way zip on the front.’
    • ‘More pockets can mean more zips and more zips can mean more locks, which in turn means more sweaty moments at airport security-checks.’
    • ‘He hauled his jacket on, his shaking fingers fumbling to fasten the zip.’
    • ‘Yes, belts, buckles and zips are high fashion for us men this winter.’
    • ‘Simple daily routines, such as peeling potatoes or fastening zips and buttons, become near impossible.’
    • ‘I can't manage things like zips, so they took the zips out and put Velcro in instead.’
    • ‘He held up a pair of black baggy jeans with bright pink zips on them.’
    • ‘Miss Stephenson was wearing black baggy knee-length combat trousers covered in zips and chains, and knee-length stripy socks with white Adidas trainers.’
    • ‘Some of the most original pieces are by Danny Greig, 18, who has produced skirts and bodices made almost entirely from zips.’
    • ‘Some of the cleverer manufacturers are now putting separate compartments on the inside so that there is only one outer zip to lock.’
    • ‘I reciprocated and started undoing various buttons, zips and straps.’
    • ‘It's a urethane-laminated pack with welded waterproof seam construction with a truly water tight zip.’
    • ‘He wore dark brown baggy trousers covered with zips.’
    • ‘Today, however, I set out for the walk and the zip stayed open as I pulled it up.’
    • ‘There were a couple of howlers, including a reference to the zip fastener long before its invention.’
    • ‘I need, not just want, some new boots with tougher zips and buckles than the last pair, which will last through the coming year and the afore-mentioned snow.’
    • ‘Many women had to use elastic and zips to adjust their own uniforms or borrow bigger uniforms from colleagues.’
    • ‘Since then, the cotton tops have been shrunk, tie-dyed, torn, cropped, coloured, encrusted with jewels and covered in zips.’
    • ‘It took me about 2 minutes before I'd quietly undone the two zips on the tent door and silently projected myself head first out of it.’
    1. 1.1as modifier Denoting something fastened by a zip.
      ‘a zip pocket’
      • ‘Zip pants, wide leg drawstrings, and comfy fleece trousers with matching zip jackets are staple items.’
      • ‘He was wearing black tracksuit bottoms and a blue Adidas zip top.’
      • ‘Both men ran off down Lomeshaye Road with the bag, which contained £125 cash in a black, zip purse, and some cosmetics.’
      • ‘The addition of a track jacket or button-down or zip cardigan updates the look and adds warmth.’
      • ‘Key items are loose cotton zip cardigans or hoodies, loose-fitting jersey knit pants, double-faced lycra tank tops and T-shirts.’
      • ‘Her red silk duchesse satin zip front jacket has the potential to be one of the hits of the collection.’
      • ‘She was wearing blue jeans and a black zip top with ‘Sherbourne’ written on the front in white lettering.’
      • ‘The pants have an elastic drawcord waist, articulated knees, stretch panels on the waist, and a back zip pocket.’
      • ‘It's light and has plenty of space, as well as a zip pocket.’
      • ‘He had dark eyes and was wearing a grey hooded zip top and light blue jeans.’
      • ‘If you are looking for something slightly dressier, try this putty colored zip front jacket by Calvin Klein.’
      • ‘Her white zip jumper hung loosely round her hips and her brown hair was up in a ponytail.’
      • ‘It has a front zipper closure with inside storm flap, diagonal front zip pockets, two inside pockets and locker loop, plus a left chest embroidery access pocket.’
      • ‘On reflection now, though Mary-Kate or Ashley look pretty good in black leather skirt and matching zip mini-top, fishnets and boots.’
      • ‘In a tan velour hooded zip sweatshirt, blue cords and a plaid rust, blue and cream button down, Rob tells me that I look too pale in browns.’
      • ‘These Banana Republic classic five-pocket cargos with zip fly are available in oregano or khaki.’
      • ‘I briefly took in what he was wearing - faded jeans, a green t-shirt, and a black zip hoodie.’
      • ‘He had dropped off a pair of sweats and a zip front sweatshirt for Blair to come home in.’
      • ‘Another tip with regards to this documentation is to pack it somewhere where you can access it easily, but which is secure, say in an inside zip pocket of your rucksack.’
      • ‘His clothing included blue tracksuit bottoms, a red zip top and a dark t-shirt.’
  • 2informal mass noun Energy; vigour.

    ‘he's full of zip’
    • ‘In midfield, Steve Schumacher's welcome return added zip and zest and brought legs to the piston-like work-rate of Lee Crooks.’
    • ‘To be fair, you have about 4000% more energy and zip as a speaker than anyone there today.’
    • ‘The zip she detects in Tokyo is missing in London and/or Paris and/or New York, she is saying.’
    • ‘Want to add some crunch to your salad, some zing to your pasta, some zip to your dip?’
    • ‘As he fell from favor, his comedies lost their zip, and finally, after fighting tuberculosis for many years, he died at the age of fifty-one.’
    • ‘He didn't appear to have much zip or intensity and dropped some catchable balls.’
    • ‘This is not a personality-driven, motivational DVD with a driving pop music score for added zip.’
    • ‘Even in the scrappy draw with Everton last Monday, there were signs that it has given them a bit of their old zip, and they will approach this afternoon in good spirits.’
    • ‘Softer than Sapphire with less aromatic zip, Van Gogh has elegant texture and fresh flavors, as well as less bitter bite than most other gins.’
    • ‘From the other side, he doesn't have sparkling offensive statistics and his throws don't have great zip.’
    • ‘He demonstrated zip to throw over the middle and made a great throw to his right, hitting WR Muhsin Muhammad on a play-action pass to set up the Jones TD.’
    • ‘It had a bit of zip, and it was a nice diversion from the usual power ballads.’
    • ‘Each mouthful is a bit different, and you can add zip from the dip of accompanying hot sauce.’
    • ‘RHP Pat Hentgen has lost some zip off his fastball since suffering shoulder tendinitis in '98, but he tries to compensate with location.’
    • ‘Did his punches have the same zip from the second round on?’
    • ‘The former national player has added that much-need zip to the attack, bowling long spells and dominating the batsmen.’
    • ‘The zip and energy shown by Wales in attack was one of the major plus points for Hearts.’
    • ‘However, this experiment with more realism injected into the series lacks a certain amount of zip that diehard fans have come to know and love.’
    • ‘A different Bees side emerged for the second half, and a more familiar zip characterised all they tried to do.’
    • ‘The sliced papaya was refreshing and the ceviche was tasty even without much citrus zip.’
    enthusiasm, zest, zestfulness, appetite, relish, gusto, eagerness, keenness, avidity, zeal, fervour, ardour, passion, love, enjoyment, joy, delight, pleasure, excitement
    enthusiasm, zest, zestfulness, appetite, relish, gusto, eagerness, keenness, avidity, zeal, fervour, ardour, passion, love, enjoyment, joy, delight, pleasure, excitement
    View synonyms

pronoun

North American
informal
  • Nothing at all.

    ‘you got zip to do with me and my kind, buddy’
    • ‘They sat around for a good while scratching their heads and coming up with exactly zippo.’
    • ‘A quarter of the songs played on Miami's Power 96 are dance hall, compared with zip two years ago.’
    • ‘I typed in the name Patrick Goldstein and again, zippo - nada.’
    • ‘School's nearly back in session, and we feel your panic as your fun-filled summer days wind down to zippo.’
    • ‘After 30 minutes, I have learned nothing, nada, zippo.’
    • ‘Players and nonplayers alike get aced out of cherished, indispensable things all the time and get zip in return, so it seems only reasonable to want to balance the equation a little.’
    • ‘‘No, zero, zippo,’ Katharine Armstrong, who hosted the hunt, told her local paper.’
    • ‘That will mean that anyone earning under $38,000 gets zero, zippo, and members of Parliament get at least $100 a week extra.’
    • ‘Last year had the decent ‘Legally Blonde,’ but this year - zippo.’
    • ‘‘My social life is pretty much zippo,’ Maxhimer said.’
    • ‘I checked in on concerned daughter, again zippo.’
    • ‘And you don't have to sacrifice zip for cleaner air.’
    • ‘Roberts also has absolutely no experience - zippo - in the criminal justice system.’
    • ‘Right now, the score: They're down zip to two to Paraguay.’
    • ‘Meanwhile our heating bill went up almost $150 and we get zip because, apparently, we make way too much money (note the sarcasm).’
    • ‘That had zip to do with the election result because in the end people will vote on issues.’
    • ‘Anybody who needs to correct someone about beauty college not being a real college has a navy bean for a heart and a kindness quotient of zip.’
    • ‘Sure, he launched some missiles back in '91, accomplishing zip.’
    • ‘But the important point about this matter is that under this Government there are jobs there; under that member's Government there were none - not one, zippo.’
    • ‘So if people over 65 vote Labour or National in this election, they will get zip.’
    nothing, nil, nothing at all, not a single thing, not anything, none
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: imitative.

Pronunciation

zip

/zɪp/