Definition of zakat in English:

zakat

noun

  • [mass noun] Payment made annually under Islamic law on certain kinds of property and used for charitable and religious purposes, one of the Five Pillars of Islam.

    • ‘One of the quickest ways of getting help is to go to the mosque and ask for zakat.’
    • ‘My zakat forces me to unshackle myself from my money, time, and efforts and places them towards good.’
    • ‘In the absence of the Islamic state, zakat is given directly by the individual zakat payers to those stated in the pervious verse of the Quran.’
    • ‘The introduction and organization of zakat in 624 A.D. encouraged accounting for the purpose of zakat calculation and payment.’
    • ‘If they did not discharge your zakat according to Shariah, your zakat obligation will not be fulfilled.’
    • ‘Muslims pray five times a day; give alms, or zakat, to the poor; and fast during the month of Ramadan.’
    • ‘Giving zakat at the end of Ramadan is also a religious requirement.’
    • ‘While we pray five times and fast and pay our zakat and go to the hajj, we have lost our souls.’
    • ‘One of the five pillars of Islam is zakat - giving 2.5% of one's savings each year to charity.’
    • ‘There is no income tax in Saudi Arabia, but there is an effective obligation to pay a religious tax called zakat, of about 10%.’
    • ‘Alms are given to the poor; this zakat is another of the five pillars of the faith.’
    • ‘This is still much lower than what the traditional Muslim is expected to give in zakat.’
    • ‘To do this, they emphasised the practice of zakat, or alms giving.’
    • ‘Many Muslims prefer to give zakat during the holy fasting month of Ramadan.’
    • ‘Donating a share of one's income to charity, zakat, is a fundamental requirement of being a Muslim, more important - some say - than the pilgrimage to Mecca.’
    charity, bounty, benefaction, subsidy, endowment, largesse
    View synonyms

Origin

Via Persian and Urdu from Arabic zakā(t) almsgiving.

Pronunciation

zakat

/zəˈkɑːt/