Definition of wounding in English:

wounding

adjective

  • 1Causing physical injury.

    ‘crossbows and deadly wounding darts’
    • ‘But no sooner had Porrus delivered a wounding blow to the knight's left arm than the knight returned a blow to his shield.’
    • ‘The military response was swift and wounding.’
    • ‘A wounding strike from this man could mean instant death.’
    • ‘The initial corporeal silence of the wound, the muted mark of the sword's wounding penetration, is not alone sufficient-there cannot be, as Derrida writes of Artaud, "stigmata … substituted for the text".’
    • ‘On the way he staged a wounding attack on himself.’
    1. 1.1 Causing harm to a person's feelings or reputation.
      ‘a wounding description of their mother’
      ‘most wounding to her was the loss of her independence’
      • ‘He is more correct than he may have imagined, his words betraying an even more wounding significance.’
      • ‘She is surprised by the intelligence into a wounding tactlessness.’
      • ‘Perhaps it is the emotionally wounding proximity of him that brings back suppressed memories of the past.’
      • ‘He was never at a loss for the wounding remark, the inappropriately coarse joke, the cold put-down.’
      • ‘When the daughters accidentally humiliate her at the dinner table by breezily offering up a wounding description of how they see their mother, Sarandon's wordless reaction is an example of superb screen acting.’

Pronunciation

wounding

/ˈwuːndɪŋ/