Definition of world order in English:

world order

noun

  • A system controlling events in the world, especially a set of arrangements established internationally for preserving global political stability:

    ‘the Commonwealth was the foundation of a new world order’
    • ‘This juxtaposition between western products and human desperation underlines the inequalities of the new world order.’
    • ‘It is always a different world order that we are looking for be it politically, socially or economically.’
    • ‘So, even if the world hasn't been accommodating to liberalism to date, this does not mean that it cannot be made into a liberal world order.’
    • ‘And as each region develops its own arrangements, they will cumulatively have an impact on the world order.’
    • ‘This time the outcome could radically alter the economic world order.’
    • ‘Then it was naively believed that the west meant what it said about a new world order.’
    • ‘Once the old world order had broken down, in the new climate of instability, the old routines no longer worked.’
    • ‘They created a new world order based on the modern industrialised nation state.’
    • ‘This is why the constitution of the new world order is not being written at the United Nations.’
    • ‘The old world order organised around nation states was far from perfect.’
    • ‘But who wants a world order shaped by these unelected, unaccountable characters?’
    • ‘By exchanging the bullet for the ballot box, they are helping to create a better world order that all of us dream of.’
    • ‘It is the idea of responding to networked threats through a networked world order.’
    • ‘There would be a new world order, and it would in these ways be liberal.’
    • ‘It is clear that there are now two superpowers - the new world order led by the US and the anti-war global movement.’
    • ‘In the new world order, local state authority was out and global interventionism was in.’
    • ‘Transatlantic solidarity will remain the basis of the world order, in which Europe has its role to play.’
    • ‘And whose vast loans and political clout help such a world order to flourish?’
    • ‘But just how much would the Prime Minister's vision of a new world order cost?’
    • ‘We cannot destroy the existing world order until we have a better one with which to replace it.’