Definition of wool in English:

wool

noun

mass noun
  • 1The fine, soft curly or wavy hair forming the coat of a sheep, goat, or similar animal, especially when shorn and prepared for use in making cloth or yarn.

    ‘Harris tweed is made from pure new wool’
    • ‘Until recently, sheep shearing and wool processing was the major industry.’
    • ‘Sally has been organically farming the fine wool from Wensleydale sheep in Stoodleigh, Devon, for 11 years and now has the largest flock in the world.’
    • ‘When it snowed on the peaks we used to shear the wool from the sheep and goats.’
    • ‘She was wearing a cloak made out of a Lena's fur, which was much like a sheep's wool, only finer and much softer.’
    • ‘Farming provided food, and their sheep provided wool for cloth.’
    • ‘In addition to building fertility, the sheep provide wool for Kimberton Hills' textile workshop.’
    • ‘The wool is sheared in early spring and sold to Tierra Wools.’
    • ‘Local wool and goat hair is hand woven into various textiles.’
    • ‘The entire body and limbs were covered with a thick fine hair or wool curling tightly to the skin.’
    • ‘Tents and rugs are made from sheep's wool or goats' hair.’
    • ‘They believed thick hair was best and used hair extensions and wigs made of real hair or sheep's wool to achieve this ‘look.’’
    • ‘Nesting material is usually moss, wool, hair and feathers.’
    • ‘He pulled out his trusted wooden sword and cut a swath of wool from the sheep, exposing the flesh of the animal.’
    • ‘It was a weaving village, raising sheep for wool, making strong cloth, dying it, and sometimes making clothing items out of it.’
    • ‘A cape made of goat or sheep wool, called a bourka, is worn around the shoulders.’
    • ‘Nomads of the desert and the high plateau live in tents woven from goat's hair, wool, and grass.’
    • ‘At first it had seemed such a good idea, to sit at the spinning wheel and spin the soft cream wool of her Jacob's sheep into fine woollen thread.’
    • ‘In the case of meat sheep versus wool sheep, wool is usually around $10 a kilo, and meat $2 a kilo.’
    • ‘The initial lining is made of fine grasses and bark, and then a second lining of feathers, wool, or other animal hair is added.’
    • ‘People breed sheep with the intention of shearing their wool, making clothing out of their skin, and eating their flesh.’
    fleece, hair, coat
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Yarn or textile fibre made from wool.
      ‘carpets made of 80 per cent wool and 20 per cent nylon’
      count noun ‘a sampler in coloured wools’
      as modifier ‘her blue wool suit’
      • ‘Lightweight wools, silks, cottons, and rayons work well together.’
      • ‘Barry sold the leather business and developed a business called Nature's Choice selling garments knitted from New Zealand wools and mohair for the tourist market.’
      • ‘All his suits are handmade with the finest wool and lined with pure silk.’
      • ‘Cashmeres and other wools lend themselves to great patterns - like glenplaid, houndstooth and checks - that are easy to layer with shirts and sweaters.’
      • ‘Indians stoles, shawls and textiles found their way into English homes and Indian wools and cottons became a part of European dress.’
      • ‘It is a 70-m long linen hanging, embroidered with coloured wools.’
      • ‘Kirby's collection has recently expanded to include classically styled trousers in Super - 120 wools and wool cashmere blends.’
      • ‘We must have sold millions and millions and millions of yards of navy blue cashmere or pure wools, beautiful quality fabrics, which I always did.’
      • ‘For Merino and halfbred wools, fibre diameter is the major factor that contributes to price variation as it significantly influences both fibre processing properties and ultimate product quality.’
      • ‘Our fabric experience is extensive, ranging from treated cottons and wools, through to heavy duty Aramid blends, depending upon threat levels and customer budgets.’
      • ‘Colours were principally black and white with wools and cottons, though navies did appear to suit the regal mood.’
      • ‘Rather than using solid-color yarns, many modern braided rugs employ a variety of different fabrics from wools to cottons and blends.’
      • ‘Using primarily wools and specialty yarns varied in texture and color, the couple creates fine-art wall hangings.’
      • ‘Some machines have a special wool cycle for wools and similar material.’
      • ‘Many of the appliqués and wools and cottons used to fashion whole-cloth quilts were imported from England and are of the highest quality.’
      • ‘Unlike other luxurious wools such as cashmere and pashmina, shahtoosh is produced from the fine, inner hairs of the Tibetan antelope - which cannot be shorn from the animal.’
      • ‘It's a very adult looking calf-length wool & cashmere coat and it makes me very happy.’
      • ‘Even so, it takes a skilled weaver working with special wools and dyes a month or more to create a square yard of tapestry, so Aubusson never comes cheap.’
      • ‘I love the mix of old and new furnishings, the sense of history in flagstoned kitchen and ancient Aga, the jumble of meadow mixed plants in gardens, the tactile wools and silks and cottons, the worn wooden floors.’
      • ‘American combat uniforms were a combination of wools and rugged herringbone twilled cotton, designed to be worn in layers and usually in a number of non-regulation combinations.’
    2. 1.2with modifier The soft underfur or down of some mammals.
      ‘beaver wool’
      • ‘They breed angora rabbits, originally for meat, but now to turn their fur into angora wool clothing.’
      • ‘The women now produce high-quality alpaca wool sweaters with their own brand name.’
      • ‘For two decades poachers have slaughtered chiru by the thousands for their wool, which is finer and more expensive than cashmere.’
      • ‘I shivered with each step taken while she glided on in a warm alpaca wool sweater resurrected from her bulkiest bag.’
      • ‘Solid-colored llama wool sweaters offer protection against the cold Andean night air.’
    3. 1.3with modifier A metal or mineral made into a mass of fine fibres.
      ‘lead wool’
      • ‘There are many grades of steel wool on the market today.’
      • ‘Aluminium can be keep clean with fine steel wool and plenty of soap.’
      • ‘All materials (cellulose Soxhlet thimbles, silica wool, vials) were cleaned with analytical grade organic solvents prior to use.’
      • ‘A piece of fine steel wool soaked with the gel ought to get the rest.’

Phrases

  • pull the wool over someone's eyes

    • Deceive someone by telling untruths.

      • ‘I thought somebody was pulling the wool over my eyes.’
      • ‘Perhaps they were great actors, pulling the wool over my eyes, and they have a plan in the back room to attack that market.’
      • ‘The president's ‘$11 trillion’ is meaningless and an attempt to pull the wool over your eyes.’
      • ‘No - it is still being used to pull the wool over our eyes.’
      • ‘He pulled the wool over their eyes with a forged student ID card.’
      • ‘He presents it as though he's pulling the wool over our eyes, only we are all too stupid to notice.’
      • ‘They were pulling the wool over our eyes from Day One.’
      • ‘But I merely pulled the wool over his eyes so he'd shut up.’
      • ‘Being in the ‘promised land’ is obviously not all it's cracked up to be - or just maybe the board are pulling the wool over our eyes.’
      • ‘We submit further that each one of the defendants told you lie after lie after lie in order to attempt to pull the wool over your eyes.’
      deceive, fool, trick, take in, hoodwink, dupe, delude
      View synonyms
  • wool away!

    • A shearer's call requesting the clearing away of a newly shorn fleece.

      ‘when he finished he shouted ‘wool away’ at the top of his voice’
      • ‘If the board hand is slow and fails to clear the wool out of the shearer's way in time, the shearer will be heard to cry "wool away".’
      • ‘A shout of 'Wool away!' brings a rouseabout scampering.’
      • ‘You try to keep up with the shearers all day, and dread the moment when they shout, "Wool away".’
      • ‘The snowy, fleece of the last sheep is kicked aside, and a yell of "Wool away!" brings a "picker-up" scampering along the board.’
      • ‘As the creaking wheels turn they seem to take up the cry—"Wool away!"’
      • ‘Even today, I sometimes long to hear the old cry "Wool away here," yelled by some angry shearer.’
      • ‘Two minutes later the cry of "Wool away" rises over the drone of machinery.’
      • ‘The shear-blades were a-clicking to the cry of "Wool away!"’

Origin

Old English wull, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wol and German Wolle, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin lana ‘wool’, vellus ‘fleece’.

Pronunciation

wool

/wʊl/