Main definitions of woof in English

: woof1woof2

woof1

noun

  • The barking sound made by a dog.

    ‘the distant woof of a dog’
    as exclamation ‘a dog never learns to go ‘Woof!’’
    • ‘She then looked at me, held her hands in the air like little paws, and barked, ‘Woof woof.’’
    • ‘Standing high on my pedals and growling threateningly, I launch into a tirade of woofs, barks, snarls and bow wow wows, praying that the Bulgarian dogs understand my Australian accent.’
    • ‘‘Woof woof,’ Reiko barked sarcastically from the bathroom doorway.’
    • ‘There are many barks in the distance - yips vs woofs, neither of which is Jasper's.’
    • ‘How did such a little Scottie dog make such a loud woof?’
    • ‘Neighbors strolled by, waving hello, and golden retrievers exchanged friendly woofs.’
    • ‘Today, I got in a great workout, some brunch, some used clothes shopping, and a few whistles and woofs from the locals.’
    • ‘I told him that it is because my name is Josh Beach and that I am the Big Dog and big dogs sometimes go woof.’
    • ‘Last night I was finishing ‘Crime Story’ when Jasper sat up, woofed a woof of surprise, and clicked over to the window.’
    • ‘Seconds later, his face is thoroughly cleansed by a rough tongue accompanied by a myriad of woofs and laughter.’
    • ‘That's when I saw him: my huge mutt stretching and yawning at such a ridiculous angle that his woof sounded like ‘boo.’’
    • ‘The animal's footfalls seemed to echo in the woofs as the boy continued to listen intently.’
    • ‘We at Blighty wonder whether it was black like a Labrador, had floppy ears and went, ‘Woof woof!’’
    • ‘Owen picks ‘Hubble’ up from the pound and within five minutes has been zapped by an alien ray that lets him understand the language of woofs.’
    squeal, squawk, screech, shriek, scream, howl, yowl, wail, yell, cry, call, shout, bawl, yawl, whoop
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verb

  • 1no object (of a dog) bark.

    ‘the dog started to woof’
    • ‘So what's wrong with the tree that Crusoe's woofing at?’
    • ‘And try as I might, I just couldn't get Geoff Wood to miaow or woof!’
    • ‘Scrappy woofs and Harry thinks that mean's no, so I tell him it means yes.’
    • ‘He looked down at her finger, then back at her, woofed at her through his teeth, still waiting for another word he would recognize.’
    • ‘She was slender and petite with a heart-shaped face and sapphire eyes that just seemed to glow and a figure that still made construction workers woof whenever she walked past them.’
    • ‘The speed of the cat startled the dog and she woofed lunging forward.’
    • ‘The dog woofed and waived his tail, staring imploringly at his master.’
    • ‘Both animals woofed excitedly as Garth and Iris exited the car.’
    • ‘What's he supposed to do, woof once for yes and twice for no?’
    • ‘Other dogs sit tethered to benches, and occasionally woof at competing mutts, but Jasper whines and barks the entire time.’
    • ‘Last night I was finishing ‘Crime Story’ when Jasper sat up, woofed a woof of surprise, and clicked over to the window.’
    • ‘Every time Rover woofs, a pocket computer will tell you what he is saying via the Animal Emotion Analysis System.’
    • ‘I understand that when dogs woof, they may be saying one of several things.’
    woof, yap, yelp, bay
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    1. 1.1US informal Say something in a boastful or aggressive manner.
      ‘mister, you weren't just woofing— you can cook’
      • ‘I doubt he would be woofing about him missing the shot because the bottom line is that the guy outplayed him to steal the ball in the first place.’
      • ‘Jackson also is extremely loyal to his players, including Kobe - who has publicly defied his coach and even woofed at him when his selfishness was questioned during a timeout recently.’
      • ‘No doubt the crowd was piqued by the post-game smack-talking between the players, who woofed at each other jaw-to-jaw with a pitifully comic fervor reminiscent of weigh-ins at a heavyweight championship bout.’
  • 2informal with object Eat (food) ravenously.

    ‘Mike was woofing down fried eggs and hash browns’
    • ‘Mike asked the entire group after we had finished woofing down our lunch.’
    • ‘Thai families are woofing down servings of roast squid, fish balls and sticky rice.’
    • ‘God, I never thought she would ask me that, and of course I nodded, thinking back to the Greek salad and wrap I had for lunch and the waffles which I had woofed down for breakfast.’
    • ‘The winner, Chana Suksabai, shown here looking as if he is about to barf, managed to woof down 10 crocodile eggs in 4 minutes.’
    • ‘I nuked and woofed down an enormous bowl of porridge while pretending to read the paper but while actually watching Trisha.’
    • ‘Ah just download and have a listen, it's Friday morning and there's tea and toast to be woofed…’
    • ‘To give him his due, the five-year-old would happily sit and wait until I had finished my main course, but the little one is a different kettle of fish (something else she would probably woof down, given half a chance).’
    • ‘‘Hey Aidan slow down, you'll get intergestion’ Brittany said as Aidan woofed down his food.’

Origin

Early 19th century: imitative.

Pronunciation

woof

/wʊf/

Main definitions of woof in English

: woof1woof2

woof2

noun

  • another term for weft
    • ‘These two modes of being are consistent with one another, and they coincide with the warp and woof of reality - laws and conditions.’
    • ‘For a time, however, legal and cultural signifiers of status masked these similarities; these signifiers entered into the warp and woof of material interests and ideological needs.’
    • ‘Understanding that, like everything before us, we will rot our way back into the woof and warp of the planet.’
    • ‘He regretted that if such irresponsible, poisonous and aggressive speeches were not stopped, they would cause irreparable loss to the country's secular warp and woof.’
    • ‘Caught in weft and woof of India's looms are stories of ancient skills, artistry and tradition.’
    • ‘We are surrounded now by rapidly advancing technology that - for better or worse - is leaving ever-more detailed, intimate, vivid records of the warp and woof of our lives.’
    • ‘But that's crazy when you see how Wortmann has artfully grafted a passion for football onto the warp and woof of ordinary existence and made them whole.’
    • ‘Philosophy, in sum, should not burden itself with discovering ethereal ideas floating around in a Platonic heaven, but with tending the warp and woof of human speech.’
    • ‘The recounting of heroic exemplars is more than just poetic entertainment; it is the warp and woof of the social fabric itself.’
    • ‘In its ancient usage, weaving creates surfaces and volumes by the regular interlacing of pliable strands - the warp and the woof - passing over and under each other at right angles.’
    • ‘Pluralism was woven into the warp and woof of Indian society.’
    • ‘Oral history, early historical accounts, maps, legends, photos, illustrations, and biographies are interwoven as the woof of this tapestry.’
    • ‘The very legend of the Old South, for example, is warp and woof of the Southern mind.’
    • ‘It is altogether possible that we may see far-reaching changes in the basic structure of our Government, in the woof of our political thinking.’
    • ‘How sad are the D.C.s of the world who seek only to rend and never to mesh with the warp and woof of a community.’
    • ‘I wanted to convey the flavour, the texture, the weft and woof of this most important relationship.’
    • ‘She either brings forward or partially conceals the fine grid of the linen's sturdy warp and woof, establishing dual, interacting planes that are occasionally scored with gestural, curvilinear zips.’
    • ‘For it is in the interest of the Intelligence Community to have its work dealt with as part of the warp and woof of international relations even if, as is sure to be the case, the descriptions are sometimes unflattering or critical or worse.’
    • ‘The figure is formed, as in damask, by the warp overlapping several threads of the woof.’
    • ‘And yet, until the age of experts, ethical issues were not thought of as separable from the warp and woof of the practices of everyday life.’

Origin

Old English ōwef, a compound from the base of weave; Middle English oof later became woof by association with warp in the phrase warp and woof.

Pronunciation

woof

/wuːf/