Definition of women's suffrage in English:

women's suffrage

noun

  • [mass noun] The right of women to vote.

    • ‘The Rabbi opposes women's suffrage, not exactly a hot topic in 1940, but then Roth is limning character, don't you see?’
    • ‘It begins, most likely in 1908 with the Socialist Party of the United States organizing a Women's Committee to campaign for women's suffrage.’
    • ‘If America truly was a liberal idea from the start, why did our nation need to take a stand for women's suffrage and civil rights or against segregation and slavery?’
    • ‘The Nineteenth Amendment, ratified in 1920, established women's suffrage.’
    • ‘In the 19th century anti-slavery advocates held rallies and there were large gatherings to debate women's suffrage.’
    • ‘Throughout history you would be considered open-minded if you supported desegregation, or women's suffrage, or even democracy.’
    • ‘In principle, he let it be known, he was not opposed to women's suffrage, though when a measure was introduced in the last parliament, he voted against it.’
    • ‘These same arguments have been used against every electoral reform in history, from offering non-landowners the vote to women's suffrage.’
    • ‘Australian history covered the Vietnam moratorium, Federation, the White Australia policy, Sydney in 1901, immigration, women's suffrage and communism.’
    • ‘That honour goes to Sir John Hall, also an advocate of women's suffrage, who attempted to introduce the single transferable vote system for parliamentary elections in 1887.’
    • ‘In 1871, both houses of the Wyoming legislature, led by its Democratic members, voted to repeal women's suffrage, but the bill was vetoed by the Republican territorial governor.’
    • ‘At the beginning of this week members stood up one after the other and talked proudly of the lead that New Zealand had given to the world in women's suffrage and our particular brand of democracy.’
    • ‘The Hepburns were reformist socialists, supporters of women's suffrage, trade unions, civil rights, birth control, and strong anti-war campaigners.’
    • ‘And where does the royal family stand on the question of women's suffrage?’
    • ‘Many times I have endured the vile brutalities of imprisonment and force feeding for the crime of working for women's suffrage.’
    • ‘One other note: modern day protest movements are different beasts than the civil rights movement, women's suffrage, or the labor movements.’
    • ‘From the abolition of slavery, women's suffrage, and civil and human rights to peace and the environment, prophetic religion has led the way to social change.’
    • ‘With the advent of universal adult male suffrage in 1918, and women's suffrage in 1928, came success for the Labour Party, and the WEA became associated with it in many people's minds.’
    • ‘In our own country, the rhetoric of praise sung by women played an important role in the abolition, women's suffrage, and civil rights movements.’
    • ‘From women's suffrage to the civil rights movement, people of faith have often been in the forefront of efforts to expand and extend democracy.’