Definition of womb in English:

womb

noun

  • The organ in the lower body of a woman or female mammal where offspring are conceived and in which they gestate before birth; the uterus.

    • ‘Babies who are exposed to mercury while in the womb can suffer severe damage to the nervous system and may die.’
    • ‘Pregnant women can get varicose veins because of the pressure on the veins in the pelvis as the womb expands.’
    • ‘A woman's pelvic floor supports the bladder, womb and the bowel.’
    • ‘Its open letter on cloning was prompted by newspaper headlines of Panos Zavos's claims to have transferred the first cloned human embryo into a woman's womb.’
    • ‘This was surprising to me - the hormones we're exposed to in the womb affect our finger lengths in statistically significant ways.’
    • ‘Aquatic experiences begin in the mother's womb where an infant is surrounded by amniotic fluid.’
    • ‘Malrotation is a type of mechanical obstruction caused by abnormal development of the intestines while a fetus is in the mother's womb.’
    • ‘One of the things your health care provider monitors is the size of your abdomen and the amount of amniotic fluid in your womb.’
    • ‘A hysteroscopy is an examination of the inside of the womb using a telescope called a hysteroscope.’
    • ‘I only ever say womb as a joke, although uterus sounds ridiculously medical.’
    • ‘In emergencies a vertical abdominal and womb incision may be used.’
    • ‘Stem cells from amniotic fluid have been used to repair windpipe defects in unborn lambs while still in the womb.’
    • ‘This drug dissolves in the womb and results in the formation of scar tissue at the ends of the fallopian tubes, presumably preventing contraception.’
    • ‘This fertilised egg then needs to be implanted in the woman's womb.’
    • ‘The cervix is the lower, narrow part of the uterus or womb, which is located in a woman's lower abdomen.’
    • ‘With the growth of anatomical knowledge, the literal hypothesis of the morbidly wandering womb became increasingly untenable.’
    • ‘Some of the man's sperm is put into the woman's womb at the same time as ovulation (the release of an egg), making conception more likely.’
    • ‘This is a major operation in which the cervix and womb are removed.’
    • ‘The baby is protected by the amniotic fluid in the womb and by your abdomen.’
    • ‘In the past, it was thought that the baby's feet were twisted or cramped because of the way the baby lay in its mother's womb.’

Origin

Old English wamb, womb, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

womb

/wuːm/