Definition of wing mirror in English:

wing mirror

noun

  • A rear-view mirror projecting from the side of a motor vehicle.

    • ‘I decided to try to get RAC man's attention by glaring at him via his wing mirror.’
    • ‘What they've got to remember is a dented wing mirror to a car is a broken leg to a rider.’
    • ‘Visibility in the miniscule rear view mirror is like watching traffic through a spy hole, whilst the wing mirror proves pretty much ornamental.’
    • ‘On the same street, a Ford Fiesta had £75 of damage caused when its nearside wing mirror was smashed.’
    • ‘A quick blip of the keyfob, touch the button under the wing mirror, the glass lowers and the door pops open.’
    • ‘The bus was found four hours later in Fleur de Lys, just a few miles from Blackwood, with a wing mirror missing and a scrape down one side.’
    • ‘Motorists were urged to regularly use mirrors and wing mirrors, be more alert at traffic lights, and check for bikers when pulling out at junctions or roundabouts.’
    • ‘Roman sat up against the seat, still tense but looking slightly more reassured as he peered into his wing mirror.’
    • ‘Eventually you will have penalty points added to your licence for a broken taillight or a bent wing mirror.’
    • ‘No, but I bent the wing mirror and smashed the headlamps.’
    • ‘I glance in the wing mirror of the car and check how I look, I'm so nervous and my hands are shaking as I push my fringe away from my eyes.’
    • ‘‘You and me both’ he said, while accelerating, looking in his wing mirror for oncoming traffic.’
    • ‘With the Dynamic trim you get in addition electric wing mirrors, height adjustable driver's seat and fold back tables on the backs of the front seats.’
    • ‘I don't argue, but watch through the wing mirror as Ryder walks away with three large, black figures.’
    • ‘Off the ferry at Dover, quickly adjust wing mirrors and straight into town centre traffic.’
    • ‘I pulled myself aloft into the cab, steadied my nerves with a few deep breaths, checked the wing mirror, which is the size of a widescreen television, and pulled away.’
    • ‘At traffic lights they'd hang lollipops over your wing mirror to try and get you to buy them, all for the sake of 20 pence or something like that; eight-year-old kids.’
    • ‘Something happened behind the van which made a very loud noise and the dog calmly glanced in the wing mirror, just like a driver, to see what had happened… such a human thing, it made me laugh!’
    • ‘At least being able to use a car park would probably ensure a space was available and would probably extend the life of the average wing mirror.’
    • ‘One lot will snatch your wing mirror if you drive into their enclosure, the other will eat you if you leave your car.’

Pronunciation:

wing mirror

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