Main definitions of windy in English

: windy1windy2

windy1

adjective

  • 1Characterized by or exposed to strong winds.

    ‘a very windy day’
    ‘the cold, windy hills’
    • ‘Roy Appleyard converted from the touchline, an excellent kick considering the very windy conditions.’
    • ‘Though it was a dull, rather windy day, people turned out in force.’
    • ‘Liam Varley opened the scoring for the seasiders on this cold and extremely windy outing.’
    • ‘Jessie and myself are convinced that it is still much too windy.’
    • ‘Hilly areas are often windy, but the wind could blow strong for certain periods and then not at all during others.’
    • ‘Then again, it was a pretty windy day, and voices were muted by the sound of the wind.’
    • ‘It was clear from the start that the strong windy conditions were going to have an immediate effect on the result of the game.’
    • ‘Even if it is sunny, it can be quite windy on Lough Corrib.’
    • ‘The tradespeople aren't working outside this morning because it's too windy and dangerous.’
    • ‘As it got closer, it got extremely windy, I could barely see from the dust clouds everywhere.’
    • ‘Was warm but quite windy and once we'd got there it was basically grey.’
    • ‘The kids were running around, some with kites, as the weather was so windy.’
    • ‘Avoid low spots that might flood, as well as high, exposed, or windy locations.’
    • ‘Free-range hens huddled in their doorways because their field was a bit windy.’
    • ‘Cleaning graffiti off walls would not be everybody's first choice at 8.30 am on a cold windy day.’
    • ‘Urban heat islands occur mainly at night and are reduced in windy conditions.’
    • ‘Our weather today is very windy with the odd shower of rain.’
    • ‘The climate was temperate but windy, the terrain a mixture of downland, rocky hills and peat bogs.’
    • ‘Very windy conditions and extremely warm weather increase the dangers associated with backyard burning as well.’
    • ‘Also, do not spray soaps onto plants that are water-stressed or during hot, windy, or humid weather.’
    windswept, exposed, unprotected, open to the elements, bare, bleak
    breezy, blowy, fresh, blustery, gusty
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  • 2British Suffering from, marked by, or causing an accumulation of gas in the alimentary canal.

    • ‘After a good night out, I find I am very windy the next morning, so much so that I am totally bloated and cannot do up my trousers.’
  • 3informal Using or expressed in many words that sound impressive but mean little.

    ‘the way to save time in an exam is by omitting windy phrases’
    • ‘The king goes on to bore the hell out of them with a long, windy speech.’
    • ‘The first time I was aware of James Schuyler was in one of those rather windy American ‘Best of’ annuals.’
    • ‘Even on radio, their rhetorical style sounds windy, verbose, addicted to polysyllables for their own sake.’
    • ‘One word of warning: it's awfully windy out there, so make sure to bring items to weigh down the lighter things which are in danger of blowing away.’
    • ‘Otherwise our multi-lateral, global institutions are exposed as windy talking shops.’
    • ‘I recently took Mark Pilgrim off my links, because he wrote a very windy and tedious wind-up of Dave Winer.’
    • ‘Election Day in a Chinese village brings Jimmy Carter, windy speeches, and dubious promises’
    • ‘I'm all for due credit, but save the acknowledgements for your windy Grammy acceptance speech.’
    • ‘By the end of a book that began as a windy meditation on leadership we are left with the impression of a decent man whose experiences offer many lessons indeed.’
    • ‘All those windy characters were kind of hard to bring to life when I was reading them in high school.’
    verbose, long-winded, wordy, prolix, lengthy, overlong, prolonged, protracted, long-drawn-out, tedious
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  • 4British informal (of a person) nervous or anxious about something.

    • ‘It's a funny track and I like it, but it's funny because it works against the original Chuck D vocal, deflating it, making him sound a bit windy and stupid.’
    nervous, anxious, worried, apprehensive, on edge, edgy, tense, stressed, fretful, uneasy, jumpy, with one's stomach in knots
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English windig (see wind, -y).

Pronunciation:

windy

/ˈwɪndi/

Main definitions of windy in English

: windy1windy2

windy2

adjective

  • (of a road or river) following a curving or twisting course.

    ‘the long windy path’
    • ‘I am the original girl racer along those testing windy country roads.’
    • ‘The drive home through the windy roads was uneventful and we got back to the hotel by midnight.’
    • ‘I'm at the wheel; I'm the only one who drives, as Judy didn't like the windy roads.’
    • ‘However, like Harley-Davidson motorcycles, they look completely out of context, if not ridiculous, on the narrow, windy streets of London.’
    • ‘Nothing was more amusing than standing inside the pivot point and seeing it twist and turn as the driver maneuvered through the windy streets of Kingston.’
    • ‘People, unaware of the dangers, were shovelling it out of public buildings and their houses into the town's dry and windy streets.’
    • ‘They do not want to get stuck on those narrow, dangerous, windy roads, behind big trucks.’
    • ‘According to local police, Hatch was speeding when her car slipped through a gap between guardrails on the windy road, sending her car to the bottom of the ravine.’
    • ‘The secondary roads are windy and provide poor links to the main roads and there is no bus stop.’
    • ‘Last year we painted a picture of Kinross as a hidden gem containing stunning classics such as Loch Leven, windy roads and friendly country pubs.’
    • ‘It's a great windy road and I love driving roads like that so that's a bit of fun.’
    • ‘Paris doesn't feel that old, especially after all the time I spent in the compact, windy streets of the old City of Zurich.’
    • ‘But we did, he thought, find his agent's house, up a windy road outside of town.’
    • ‘We proceeded down a windy country road, following the River Chew towards its source.’
    • ‘I turned onto a windy road up into the hills above our town.’
    • ‘Soon we were driving along the windy roads surrounded by tall trees that led to my grand parents' house.’
    • ‘I think the most dangerous part was riding for six hours in the back of a car on windy roads.’
    • ‘Of course, I could not see the town yet, as the country road was quite windy and hilly.’
    • ‘Sometimes a Northerly gale leaps on us and has enormous fun chasing us about the windy streets as though we are of no more significance than a collection of dry leaves whirling along.’

Pronunciation:

windy

/ˈwʌɪndi/