Definition of window in English:

window

noun

  • 1An opening in the wall or roof of a building or vehicle, fitted with glass in a frame to admit light or air and allow people to see out.

    • ‘The driver's window rolled down to reveal Jonathon with a huge grin on his face.’
    • ‘I turned my head to the left and saw Rashad leaning out the front passenger side window.’
    • ‘Carolyn has opened the bay window in the room and is looking outside, when Liz feels a chill.’
    • ‘Because of the mild climate there were no glass panes in the windows.’
    • ‘Light is drawn into the room through a large bay window overlooking the front garden.’
    • ‘Both of the front bedroom windows were wide open and Nev sat in a chair by the bed.’
    • ‘A large shuttered sash window overlooking the communal square makes this an exceptionally bright area.’
    • ‘The front passenger window rolled down just enough so she could see James Alcott.’
    • ‘All the houses will have a traditional look with curved timber framed windows, decorative roof detail and over-door pediments.’
    • ‘The glass panes of some windows in the office and officers' quarters had been broken.’
    • ‘The apartments and penthouses have double-glazed redwood framed windows, fitted kitchens and gas-fired central heating.’
    • ‘Kat glanced out the car window looking around, taking as much of the place into her memory as possible.’
    • ‘When I peeked out of the upstairs bedroom window, I spotted Robert's car down the street.’
    • ‘The apartment has double-glazed sash windows and a cherrywood staircase set into a recessed wall.’
    • ‘Her eyes were gazing out the bay window in her room.’
    • ‘He told the driver where to go and Juliet sat there, gazing out the tinted windows.’
    • ‘He peered out the upstairs kitchen window to see two men outside.’
    • ‘The living room has a large double-glazed sash window overlooking Macken Street as well as a cast-iron fireplace.’
    • ‘It has wider hallways, higher ceilings, more windows admitting more natural light and more places for students to hang out.’
    • ‘The thieves broke in by forcing a casement window in the dining room before ransacking the house.’
    casement, opening, aperture
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A pane of glass filling a window.
      ‘thieves smashed a window and took £600’
      • ‘The pool was attacked three times last month by vandals who caused thousands of pounds-worth of damage when they ripped out CCTV cameras and smashed windows.’
      • ‘In the overnight rioting, about 100 attackers set fire to Redfern railway station, torched a car and smashed windows.’
      • ‘Mobs took advantage of the darkness and set fires, smashed windows and hauled away food, clothing and appliances, while the city went without power.’
      • ‘The windows were single pane glass that was stained with smoke, dirt, and the oils from human skin.’
      • ‘Steady shelling was going on, and there were occasional spatters of machine gun fire through the smashed windows of her refuge.’
      • ‘Some teachers say they are too afraid to stay behind after school and such has been the ferocity of the attacks that classrooms were littered with shards of glass from smashed windows.’
      • ‘I have lost count of the number of smashed plate glass windows in the town centre, and not just isolated premises, often several at a time.’
      • ‘Philip Nicholson, 43, said local youths had thrown stones and smashed four windows at his house in Alcuin Avenue, Tang Hall.’
      • ‘An elderly family, a pregnant woman and children were terrorised when the gang kicked in the front door, smashed windows and shouted racial abuse at them.’
      • ‘In Harare yesterday hundreds of government supporters threw stones and smashed windows at the MDC headquarters.’
      • ‘I had to visit someone in Leeds Royal Infirmary recently and in there they cleaned the ward daily - floors, walls, windows and bed frames etc.’
      • ‘She said Mr Corner's car was parked outside the Lysley Arms on July 3 at about 10 pm, when Mr Maddox picked up a stool from the pub and smashed five windows.’
      • ‘A stained glass window was smashed, along with plaster statues and the church organ, police said.’
      • ‘In May it was burgled and the Victorian stained glass window was smashed.’
      • ‘In the early hours of New Year's Day, she said, Webb visited her home and smashed windows in her front door.’
      • ‘St Peter's Church has also been a target with stained glass windows smashed.’
      • ‘The rock smashed two windows and showered one passenger with glass.’
      • ‘The three-day summit left the ancient port of Genoa littered with burnt-out cars, smashed windows and vandalised property.’
      • ‘Guiding the girls out of the mansion through the smashed windows, Robert led them around to the front of the house.’
      • ‘Kids recently smashed two windows in his work ute.’
    2. 1.2 An opening in a wall or screen through which customers are served in a bank, ticket office, or similar building.
      • ‘I ran across the street to get into the office. There were several customers at the windows, some being served, others waiting to be served.’
      • ‘Starting July 1st, two female personnel with rulers stand at the ticket windows to determine whether the length of the skirt earns a discount.’
      • ‘I was taken round the back and made my way in along a little narrow passage to a window serving as a reception desk.’
      • ‘The office was empty, swivel chairs motionless behind open reception windows.’
      • ‘You then presented this screen to the shopper in a pop-up window - something like a cash point ATM window.’
      • ‘In the ensuing chaos a few minutes after the ticket windows opened, all of the six ticket windows were damaged, and several women collapsed.’
      • ‘It is anything but out of the ordinary, too, for the ‘sell-out’ signs to be posted on the ticket office windows of the arena.’
      • ‘The colors are bright and cheery, and case officers sit at desks arranged in an open plan, rather than behind plexiglass windows.’
      • ‘Teller windows at the Bank of France were mobbed by a record crowd as a deadline for declaring franc coins expired, the central bank said on Friday.’
      • ‘They were carrying a hammer which they banged on the security windows of the bank as they demanded money.’
      • ‘In the corridor leading to the interview windows, they have panoramic views of cities in America.’
      • ‘About 20 Gothamites are waiting in line in front of old-fashioned, gated bank windows.’
      • ‘He paid Mr Wood through the window and took a ticket for the Leasgill gate.’
    3. 1.3 A space behind the window of a shop where goods are displayed for sale.
      as modifier ‘beautiful window displays’
      • ‘Food-themed window displays in many shops and businesses in the town also added extra interest.’
      • ‘The adjacent shop window display was filled with flowers and decorative plants.’
      • ‘As soon as the brown paper came down from the windows, customers started arriving.’
      • ‘She looked into one of the mirrored windows of a shop to check she looked OK.’
      • ‘This periodic table was spotted last week in Miami in the window of an Armani shop.’
      • ‘The shop window display is one of the highlights of St Patrick's week in Castlebar.’
      • ‘Had it been a usual morning, people would have been walking about and peering in various shop display windows along the block.’
      • ‘In that film, shop displays and storefront windows greeted Tom Cruise with ideas of how to enhance his clothing selections.’
      • ‘Elise was in the front window of her shop, arranging a new display for the upcoming season.’
      • ‘She looked in the windows of the shops, and chatted with some of the store owners.’
      • ‘To help during the transition period, the shop has put up posters in its windows explaining what customers should do when paying their bills in the future’
      • ‘Almost every shop has a notice in the window, advising customers of the proprietor's holiday arrangements.’
      • ‘He sped down the streets, looking into the windows of shops and restaurants.’
      • ‘Keiko looked to Otaru, who was avoiding eye contact by looking at the windows of the shops across the street.’
      • ‘They would have screamed and broken Gap windows.’
      • ‘Almost 50 town centre shops are giving up some of their window space to support carnival week.’
      • ‘Yuuba tugged on his mother's torn dress while she seemed to be staring into the window of a shop at a beautiful white silk gown.’
      • ‘Retail shops across the length and breadth of the city are dressing up their windows to attract customers.’
      • ‘I try to focus on the window displays of the shops that we pass instead of focusing on him.’
      • ‘The rest of my street was full of similarly old-fashioned houses, a few shops with iron barred windows, well-used cars and a group of bored looking kids hanging out on one corner.’
    4. 1.4 A means of observing and learning about something.
      ‘television is a window on the world’
      • ‘Our very different records are a window into what we believe and what we'll do in the next four years.’
      • ‘Doesn't your people believe that the eyes are the window to the soul?’
      • ‘When a keen reader writes about their reading, they are opening a window into their soul, and inviting you to step inside and share a holy thing.’
      • ‘It's most effective used as a road map of the recent past, or more trivially, a window on what happened the year you were born.’
      • ‘Watching Apollo 11 crew member Michael Collins shave is like having a window into a Heinlein novel.’
      • ‘The news media serves as a window to events that we cannot encounter, acting as our eyes and ears when our own eyes and ears are occupied.’
      • ‘The report was a window into our boy, in an environment where we are not readily to hand to lean on or put things aright or correct him.’
      • ‘The actors performed A Doll's House, written by Ibsen, which provides a window on the life of a seemingly happy family.’
      • ‘Vijay Kranti hopes that the current exhibition will help open a window on the life of those who have made the country their own.’
      • ‘She gives a window into a fascinating world as she explains the significance of this decision.’
      • ‘In fact, what you'd mostly see would be the gulfs between the stars, the black expanses that serve as our windows on the rest of the universe.’
      • ‘A time capsule full of treasures has opened a window into what life was like 113 years ago in Swindon.’
      • ‘View them instead as a window into a world where different rules apply, and be thankful you don't live there.’
      • ‘When we started out it was all very fresh and exciting and like opening a window into a new world.’
      • ‘Channel 5 is currently acting as a window on America, with its America's Finest strand.’
      • ‘Besides, it gives her a window on community wretchedness and some remarkable efforts to combat it.’
      • ‘Albuquerque also provided a window into how Iraq is playing with ordinary voters.’
      • ‘The next few days could be an interesting exercise in self-discovery, and a window into the world of others.’
      • ‘Well, they say the eyes are the window to the soul.’
      • ‘Selectors and critics forget that this is a window on Indian cinema, good Indian cinema.’
  • 2A transparent panel on an envelope to show an address.

    • ‘However, on examination it transpired that envelope A did not actually have a window.’
    • ‘Do you feel obliged to tear out plastic windows in envelopes before recycling them?’
    • ‘Police say the first four letters were sent using window envelopes, with the Elland Road address showing through the window.’
    • ‘Just as I'm posting it, I notice no return address is showing in the envelope's window.’
    • ‘This results in yellowed envelopes, shrunken address windows, and brittle paper.’
  • 3Computing
    A framed area on a display screen for viewing information.

    • ‘Microsoft Windows users can think of a terminal as like a DOS prompt or command window.’
    • ‘You may need to scroll or resize the pop-up image window to get a good view.’
    • ‘The viewer gets the video and audio directly into his Internet browser window.’
    • ‘Other differences relate to the rules for entering a phrase into the search engine phrase window.’
    • ‘This will leave the last update in the client browser's window after your program exits.’
  • 4An interval or opportunity for action.

    ‘the parliamentary recess offers a good window for a bid’
    • ‘According to industry sources familiar with Virgin's plans, the company is assembling a range of offerings the music service will offer with a view to those launch windows.’
    • ‘He smiled at the window of good opportunity that he thought he was getting into.’
    • ‘The choice of the time windows should span a range comparable to the delay values used in FCS.’
    • ‘The Manchester victory has opened windows and doors of opportunity for New Oak.’
    • ‘There seems to be a window of optimal function, not immediately after eating, but between meals.’
    • ‘Interview windows are usually made available to clients five to seven days before the event.’
    • ‘Such a window of ideological opportunity is unlikely to come again soon.’
    • ‘There are windows of tourism opportunity opening regularly but no-one available to spot them and act upon them before they slam shut.’
    • ‘Events such as the VJ Hunt provide such windows of advertising opportunity.’
    • ‘Not only that, we let him go on the last day of the window leaving us no time to invest the incoming funds.’
    • ‘The window period for intervention and measurement is therefore often shorter than optimal.’
    opportunity, opportune time, suitable time, right moment, chance, opening
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1 An interval during which atmospheric and astronomical circumstances are suitable for the launch of a spacecraft.
      • ‘For a mission to Mars, such launch windows are available every twenty-six months, for only a couple months at a time.’
      • ‘And the Gateway would also widen the very narrow launch windows for some planetary missions.’
      • ‘After the launch window opens but before anyone goes we decide to use that task instead of the same task as yesterday.’
      • ‘The launch window stays open and no one wants to go given the previous results and the pervasive gloom.’
      • ‘The launch windows will move back to the daytime in September.’
      • ‘They found no hint of trouble and were able to make their launch window in time.’
      • ‘Unlike for Mars, lunar launch windows are effectively continuous.’
      • ‘I notice that Jim Lamb is suiting up early and he's thinking that its time to go soon after the launch window opens.’
      • ‘I have a system to insure my own safety and compromises are already made to work around task announcements and launch windows.’
      • ‘In related news, NASA said yesterday that the launch window for its next mission to Mars will open on 10 August.’
      • ‘For interplanetary missions, such windows are much stricter than for satellites orbiting the Earth.’
      • ‘No reference to the R200 or to its launch window were made in the Smartshader announcement.’
      • ‘NASA is aiming to launch the craft during a launch window between 15 May and 3 June.’
  • 5Physics
    A range of electromagnetic wavelengths for which a medium (especially the atmosphere) is transparent.

    • ‘All of these windows are in infrared wavelengths, and they are narrow, like the gaps between the slats of a fence.’
    • ‘A series of overlapping windows representing the full range of sequence divergence were defined.’
  • 6mass noun Strips of metal foil dispersed in the air to obstruct radar detection.

Phrases

  • go out (of) the window

    • informal (of a plan or pattern of behaviour) no longer exist; disappear.

      ‘all pretence at unity went out of the window as cabinet colleagues traded insults’
      • ‘However, that plan quickly went out of the window as Blake's smart pass and turn sent Healy away down the right.’
      • ‘My game plan went out of the window within a few minutes as it was so cold that my arms started to stiffen up and I had to change stroke every 50 to 100 yards.’
      • ‘In the early stages, any plans about tactics went out the window.’
      • ‘All plans to save will go out the window if one parent is not around to bring in an income.’
      • ‘So the menu plan and the budget went out the window, and as there was only one night left we had to make some quick decisions.’
      • ‘The first part of Mayo's plan has gone out the window.’
      • ‘And if growth comes in sharply lower than Brown expects, all the parties' plans would go out of the window.’
      • ‘When she found herself back in lane one 20 minutes before the race all her plans went out the window.’
      • ‘I'd pick up drugs straight away and my plans went out of the window.’
      • ‘Eric then switched to his electric guitar, and from what I could make out, all set-list plans went out the window as he had to choose songs that would sound good played on an electric rather than an acoustic.’
  • window of opportunity

    • A favourable opportunity for doing something that must be seized immediately.

      • ‘Management, coaches and players view this season as a window of opportunity that must be seized.’
      • ‘Camera in hand, motionless, I waited for the right moment, my window of opportunity.’
      • ‘Dave gets on the phone for a while, but then says they have a window of opportunity and must go.’
      • ‘Too often restaurants that don't have a sommelier miss this window of opportunity.’
      • ‘A window of opportunity was created for the national bourgeoisie in the underdeveloped countries.’
      • ‘Alas, both men missed their windows of opportunity.’
      • ‘There is a unique window of opportunity to seize the advantages produced by the crisis.’
      • ‘The Bills may have a one-year window of opportunity before they must rebuild an aging roster.’
      • ‘I call that the window of opportunity - these dollars that we're receiving.’
      • ‘I had missed the window of opportunity to get the jet in the best landing configuration.’
      chance, lucky chance, good time, golden opportunity, time, occasion, moment, favourable moment, favourable occasion, favourable time, right set of circumstances, appropriate moment, appropriate occasion, appropriate time, suitable moment, suitable occasion, suitable time, opportune moment, opportune occasion, opportune time, opening, option, window, window of opportunity, slot, turn, go, run, clear run, field day
      View synonyms
  • window of vulnerability

    • An opportunity to attack something that is at risk (especially as a cold war claim that America's land-based missiles were easy targets for a Soviet first strike).

      • ‘Reagan was of course right about the window of vulnerability, and the Soviet Union collapsed just five years later.’
      • ‘This expands the window of vulnerability wherein critical data is at risk during the rebuild process.’
      • ‘That span - much of the first trimester - appears to be a special window of vulnerability for birth defects, Dr. Bell said, just as earlier research has suggested.’
      • ‘That's the attitude that makes full disclosure the only viable way to reduce the window of vulnerability.’
      • ‘If anti-virus vendors were able to reduce the window of vulnerability to three hours or less, mass-mailing viruses would have little if any impact.’
      • ‘Even with a window of vulnerability during the period of nuclear development the military option will not always be credible, for a variety of political reasons.’
      • ‘Few if any of the paratroopers anxiously scanning the northern sky for the telltale dust columns of Iraqi armor advancing south knew that this window of vulnerability could have been avoided.’
      • ‘This will probably be a window of vulnerability until the human intelligence capabilities are fully rebuilt.’
      • ‘This kind of holistic defensive strategy adds a proactive dimension to firewall protection, and ensures that the effects of Zero Day attacks can be minimized by making the window of vulnerability as small as possible.’
      • ‘The real window of vulnerability may be after the stress is over.’
  • the windows of the soul

    • literary The eyes.

      • ‘Eyes, in Minority Report, are literally windows on the soul, and the soul is that which yearns for brand-name fulfillment.’
      • ‘The only other male member of the cabin crew was a very appealing young lad by the name of Ian, with dark eyes there were true windows on the soul and some really kissable lips.’
      • ‘I was staring into his pupils, the windows on the soul, but all I saw was blankness.’
      • ‘Said to be the windows on the soul, your eyes are often the first thing people notice about you.’
      • ‘I can't remember who said it, but we have been told that the eyes are windows on the soul.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse vindauga, from vindr ‘wind’ + auga ‘eye’.

Pronunciation

window

/ˈwɪndəʊ/