Definition of wind something up in English:

wind something up

phrasal verb

  • 1Arrange the affairs of and dissolve a company:

    ‘the company has since been wound up’
    • ‘Having taken all steps, active or passive, required to terminate the activities of the club, short of passing a formal resolution to wind it up or dissolve it, the general meeting of the club resolved to sell the club's last asset.’
    • ‘When the company was wound up the contract was cancelled.’
    • ‘The business has to be operational for 12 weeks after which the learners are asked to wind it up.’
    • ‘Under the current rules, pensioners are ranked ahead of current workers when company schemes are wound up.’
    • ‘The authority itself is due to be wound up at the end of this month.’
    • ‘After the death of the estate owner and before the estate is wound up, the trust can provide a source of funds for the maintenance and other needs of dependants.’
    • ‘As a result, insolvent companies are not wound up but sit idle, usually heavily in debt, until they are struck off the register.’
    • ‘In those proceedings an order was made that both would be required to sign business cheques until the business was wound up, and the business financial arrangements either litigated to resolution or sorted out between the parties.’
    • ‘Eventually the partnership was wound up and a dispute arose as to what should happen to the property that the parties co-owned for their business purposes.’
    • ‘If the liquidator receives this amount at sale, then, based on the company's statement of affairs when it was wound up, the company could be left in a break-even situation.’
    dissolve, liquidate, put into liquidation
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  • 2Gradually or finally bring an activity to a conclusion:

    ‘the experiments had to be wound up because the funding stopped’
    • ‘The tone of the self-portrait with which he wound up his adolescence recalls something of Kepler's horoscope of himself.’
    • ‘They wound up the regular season at home on Thanksgiving Day as they walloped the opposition.’
    • ‘The Shakers wound up their pre-season schedule with a 1-0 defeat against a full strength Barnsley side in midweek.’
    • ‘Another chapter or two should wind this up, but I need a transitional chapter.’
    • ‘His apparent indifference to the current state of affairs merely supports the view that it is time to wind it up.’
    bring to a close, bring to a end, wind up, run down, close down, phase out
    close out
    conclude, bring to an close, bring to an end, end, terminate, finish
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  • 3informal Increase the tension, intensity, or power of something:

    ‘he wound up the engine’
    • ‘Luckily the road was fairly empty and I slammed up the gearbox winding the car up to an eyewatering 105 mph.’
    • ‘Brakes off, cranks churning, I wind it up and let it go.’
    • ‘On the highway it winds it up to about forty-five, at which point the engine and drive train are seemingly screaming the distorted symphonics of an ear-splitting concerto.’
    • ‘Like all their engines, though, this one loves to be run out to the limit, so, if you close your ears and wind it up to the 7,000 rpm ignition cut-out, it will perform much better.’
    • ‘The thing was so underpowered that you needed three miles to wind it up before you even think about passing!’