Main definitions of wimp in English

: wimp1WIMP2WIMP3

wimp1

noun

informal
  • A weak and cowardly or unadventurous person.

    • ‘She had to harden herself so that she could get on with life instead of acting like a wimp, a selfish wimp at that.’
    • ‘‘The men here are wimps,’ the hotel receptionist said scornfully.’
    • ‘Sometimes, especially at National Review, the animus against braininess has overlapped with a crusade for traditional manliness - the idea being that book learning is for wimps.’
    • ‘And the cowards and wimps don't do a single thing about it.’
    • ‘These if-onlys seemed clever arguments at the time, because the administration kept thundering that diplomacy was for wimps and Congress was being meddlesome in trying to constrain the commander in chief.’
    • ‘Boys who don't conform are ridiculed, called wimps and wusses.’
    • ‘This is not a game for wimps, quitters, or the easily-bruised: there will be no quick fixes.’
    • ‘Only wimps and wusses blamed their misfortune on others - real men made their own fortune.’
    • ‘To the local reporters, guys from Texas, the visiting journalistic prima donnas are just a bunch of Washington media wimps, whining about the heat.’
    • ‘It's shocking that so few have raised doubts and that the ones who have are called wimps, traitors and worse, with their lives threatened by cowards hiding behind anonymous letters and phone calls.’
    • ‘When I was finally able to leave, after thanking the teacher like a cowardly wimp, I wondered whether the just-concluded event was a meeting of parents or a lecture on them.’
    • ‘In some ways I am just a scared little guy, a wimp.’
    • ‘These days tram travel isn't half as cool - the trams are for wimps, with heating, doors, and no chance of enjoying a ride on the running board and getting yourself killed by falling off it like in days of yore.’
    • ‘Liberals were seen as weak-kneed wimps, unwilling to use force internationally and preoccupied with social welfare internally; local patriotisms prevailed everywhere.’
    • ‘Consequently, compared with wild mice, lab mice are wimps - slower, weaker, and less active - even if both have lived their entire lives in cages the size of a shoe box.’
    • ‘The Christian life is not for wimps, loafers or weaklings.’
    • ‘Again, this is another case of the wimps leading the wimps.’
    • ‘In Idaho, nine-to-four lift hours are for wimps.’
    • ‘And they have concluded that one way to show that we are not in fact a party of wimps and sissies is to call out the Republicans.’
    • ‘I can't stand namby-pamby wimps; it's my working-class background.’
    coward, namby-pamby, milksop, milquetoast, mouse, weakling
    View synonyms

verb

[no object]wimp out
informal
  • Fail to do or complete something as a result of fear or lack of confidence.

    ‘anyone who wimped out because of the weather missed the experience of a lifetime’
    • ‘He steeled himself to do it before he wimped out.’
    • ‘One of the guys I was out with was in at 6am as well, otherwise I would have wimped out.’
    • ‘The first time, there was no one to stop me, but I wimped out.’
    • ‘With the DVD, the electronics companies completely wimped out.’
    • ‘So just why are the media wimping out exactly when tough, critical reporting is not only crucial for the functioning of democracy but is also being demanded by their audience?’
    • ‘You go on about love; I made it very clear to you not so long ago how I feel but you wimped out on me, just like I expected.’
    • ‘But other than a few small contract maintenance deals, most of them wimped out when it came to the crunch.’
    • ‘Sometimes I worry that my fear got the better of me, that I wimped out of this process of learning to competently go it alone, to stay warm without external assistance.’
    • ‘They are going around letting down the tyres of four-wheel-drive vehicles, a campaign that has been stepped up since the local authorities wimped out of banning the monsters from the city.’
    • ‘When everybody else re-emerges only a couple of minutes later, matted in sweat and grime, we are deeply glad to have wimped out.’
    • ‘I wanted to take it into a whole rock show direction, but I wimped out because the whole sound is based around drum machines.’
    • ‘The wanna-be tough guys instantly wimped, apologized to Kirstie, and split.’
    • ‘In fact the radicals simply wimped out for fear of having their pants sued off.’
    • ‘I'm afraid I wimped out, along with the rest of the editorial team, and was in bed by three.’
    • ‘Yes, I'm wimping out on him but I simply can't pick a side.’
    • ‘Although they seem to have wimped out of trying any of these things.’
    • ‘I could not justify wimping out of the situation.’
    • ‘My brother said I was wimping out if I didn't include it.’
    • ‘I decided that they were either too keen or insane, and wimped out.’
    • ‘Today I very nearly wimped out on the Lunchquest deal, thinking that I'd pop around the corner and get a sandwich instead.’
    back out, pull out, cancel, withdraw, beg off, excuse oneself
    View synonyms

Origin

1920s: origin uncertain, perhaps from whimper.

Pronunciation

wimp

/wɪmp/

Main definitions of wimp in English

: wimp1WIMP2WIMP3

WIMP2

noun

Computing
  • often as modifier A set of software features and hardware devices (such as windows, icons, mice, and pull-down menus) designed to simplify or demystify computing operations for the user.

    ‘WIMP user interfaces’

Origin

1980s: acronym.

Pronunciation

WIMP

/wɪmp/

Main definitions of wimp in English

: wimp1WIMP2WIMP3

WIMP3

noun

Physics
  • A hypothetical subatomic particle of large mass which interacts only weakly with ordinary matter, postulated as a constituent of the dark matter of the universe.

Origin

1980s: acronym from weakly interacting massive particle.

Pronunciation

WIMP

/wɪmp/