Definition of willed in English:

willed

adjective

  • 1in combination Having a specified level of determination.

    ‘a free-willed female’
    ‘she is good-willed, not selfish’
    ‘they proved themselves to be steely-willed’
    • ‘Her bright dramatic soprano held the audience spellbound and her fierce, iron-willed portrayal dominated the second half of the evening.’
    • ‘He is the strongest-willed player who would eventually rescue the rest of the surviving team.’
    • ‘Employees are usually "low willed" and "low skilled" or "low willed" and "high skilled".’
    • ‘She is a strong-willed, independent-minded lady who, like Casanova, has a secret she has yet to reveal.’
    • ‘He is a weak-willed, manipulative narcissus.’
    1. 1.1 (of an action or feeling) deliberate.
      ‘a willed, hugely courageous act’
      ‘a willed and wary indifference’
      • ‘As such, in general lexicons the concept has the attributes of a power-play, oriented to the accomplishment of willed ends, albeit in the limited bounds of conversational interaction and behavior.’
      • ‘The larky, willed optimism of the book is revealed, too, by the action: the hero "goes through everything and undergoes nothing."’
      • ‘Visitors are also quickly drawn into the labyrinth of willed amnesia through interactive displays.’
      • ‘In his stunning study of the visual representation of slavery, he argues that "the act of ignoring conforms to a state of willed blindness."’
      • ‘He did dream therapy - which seemed to consist chiefly of willed sexual fantasies.’
  • 2Bequeathed in a will.

    ‘willed property’
    • ‘There is a basic description of the willed items.’
    • ‘He has to live in the willed property until it sells.’
    • ‘There were the proceeds from the sale of the willed property.’
    • ‘The willed third of the property cannot cover all the mentioned beneficiaries.’
    • ‘Often the willed possessions are humble and domestic items.’

Pronunciation

willed

/wɪld/