Definition of White Paper in English:

White Paper

noun

  • (in the UK) a government report giving information or proposals on an issue.

    • ‘It is understood that the proposals will form part of a White Paper on schools for publication by Education Secretary Ruth Kelly in the autumn.’
    • ‘In a White Paper currently before Parliament, the office of Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott, is setting out new regulations for local government finance.’
    • ‘It was earlier in the year that Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott published a White Paper setting out proposals to allow the nine English regions to hold referendums to decide if elected regional councils should be set up.’
    • ‘The fundamental changes the Labour government is pushing through can be further seen in a White Paper, issued in December 1999.’
    • ‘Health Secretary Alan Milburn will announce that a White Paper is to be drawn up setting out proposals intended to end the ‘blame culture’ in the NHS and cut the spiralling legal costs of medical negligence claims.’
    • ‘‘Two years ago the Government brought out a White Paper outlining ways in which tobacco issues could be tackled and encouraging local authorities to get involved,’ she said.’
    • ‘For the actual policies that Mayor Winter hopes to press ahead with, he will release a White Paper which will detail the proposals.’
    • ‘The proposals were contained in a White Paper launched yesterday by the Office of National Statistics and apply to England, Wales and Northern Ireland.’
    • ‘Not long before Monsoon Wedding was released, the government of Prime Minister Tony Blair issued a White Paper, or statement of policy, on immigration and citizenship.’
    • ‘Transport Secretary Alistair Darling will present a White Paper outlining how the country can cope with passenger growth over the next 30 years.’
    • ‘The Government is considering a radical shake-up of university funding, with its proposals to be published in a White Paper in January.’
    • ‘Unveiling the proposals in a White Paper last November, the then Health Secretary John Reid estimated a ban would cover between 70 and 90 per cent of all pubs.’
    • ‘The MoD dismissed the report as ‘pure speculation’ but a White Paper on the future of the armed forces is due within weeks.’
    • ‘A proposed change in the licensing laws, to be published in a White Paper in April, may address this issue, he said.’
    • ‘In 1998, the government released its information strategy for the NHS, entitled Information For Health, to support a White Paper which outlined the vision of a modern and dependable NHS.’
    • ‘We are already addressing some of the issues raised by Sir John Stevens and will continue the momentum with a White Paper in the spring.’
    • ‘The reform measures are still at the consultative stage, but the University hopes to issue a White Paper laying out its plans later in the year.’
    • ‘However, it has fallen short of recommending a new runway and has instead issued a consultation document, The Future of Aviation, after which it will publish a White Paper next year.’
    • ‘Present a Green Paper (for discussion) and then a White Paper (containing policy proposals) to the House of Assembly.’
    • ‘The Section 19 provision would be repealed ‘at the earliest opportunity’ and a White Paper on modernising out-of-date working conditions would come in the spring, the Hull East MP told the Commons.’

Pronunciation:

White Paper

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