Definition of Whit in English:

Whit

noun

British

adjective

British
  • Connected with or following Whit Sunday:

    ‘Whit Monday’
    • ‘This is one of the busiest times of the year, what with Whit weekend and the good weather.’
    • ‘Historically the carnival replaced the Whit walks and was held in Deepdale because that's where the majority of the West Indian population lived.’
    • ‘Today is Whit Monday and a bank holiday and, as I said I would, I am taking my little cousin to see Finding Nemo.’
    • ‘On Whit Monday, June 7, 1965 the excursion from Preston to York stopped off at Skipton, Ilkley and Otley - the last time a train visited the town.’
    • ‘A lot of the houses had their power restored by 7.30 Sunday evening, with the remainder reconnected by 11 am on Whit Monday.’
    • ‘The fact that Griffin's pranks occur during Whit Monday adds a humorous irony to a day of celebration and gaiety.’
    • ‘The annual giant auction will be held on Whit Monday, June 7, at Ardscoil Rath Iomghain.’
    • ‘He has been a dedicated member, who hardly missed a rehearsal and took part in trips abroad and Saddleworth's famous Whit Friday band contest.’
    • ‘From Whit Monday onwards Ash Street had been flooded five times, said the Herald.’
    • ‘The winners will progress to the National Finals in Donegal next Whit weekend.’
    • ‘It gave the lucky owner a fully inclusive 24-hour steam train trip to the capital and back on Whit Saturday, 15 June 1935.’
    • ‘The dispute concerns the retention of Whit Monday as a public holiday, and the strike has been set for May 16.’
    • ‘These photos will be taken over the Whit Bank Holiday Weekend, which is from Friday, June 3 to Monday, June 6.’
    • ‘The Christian holidays of Good Friday, Easter Monday, and Whit Monday are celebrated, and occur on different dates each year.’
    • ‘It also mentions that at Bowness Gala on Whit Thursday, May 17, 1883, there were 35 prizes.’
    • ‘Saddleworth gained revenge for Whit Friday's derby defeat at Greenfield with an eight-wicket Saturday victory.’
    • ‘Rochdale's best of brass marched into Saddleworth and came home with several prizes in the annual Whit Friday band contests.’
    • ‘A recent survey, published by the daily Le Parisien, showed that two-thirds of French people were against giving up their Whit Monday day off.’
    • ‘The citizens of York delighted in the brilliant weather, which was enjoyed for the Whit Monday holiday.’
    • ‘The service will mark Whit Sunday, and the beginning of Christian Aid week.’

Pronunciation:

Whit

/wɪt/

Definition of whit in English:

whit

noun

  • [in singular] A very small part or amount:

    ‘the last whit of warmth was drawn off by the setting sun’
    • ‘Did the ending make a whit of sense?’
    • ‘All of which now makes me wonder: when you come right down to it, did the antitrust trial of the century make a whit of difference?’
    • ‘No amount of talk, therapy or talk therapy will make a whit of difference.’
    scrap, bit, tiny amount, speck, iota, particle, ounce, jot, atom, crumb, shred, morsel, trifle, fragment, grain, drop, touch, trace, shadow, suggestion, whisper, suspicion, scintilla, spot, mite, tittle, jot or tittle, modicum
    stim
    smidgen, smidge
    scantling, scruple
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: apparently an alteration of obsolete wight ‘small amount’.

Pronunciation:

whit

/wɪt/