Definition of whip someone into in English:

whip someone into

phrasal verb

  • Urge or rouse someone into (a specified state or position)

    ‘the radio host whipped his listeners into a frenzy’
    • ‘This Argentinian wine is packed with delicious ripe berry character that will seduce you with its soft silky tannins, only to whip you into submission with a core of intense fruit.’
    • ‘Performing in front of his home-town crowd at the Velodrome, Farnell was whipped into a virtual frenzy by the cheering fans.’
    • ‘He has been whipped into line and made to vote against legislation that he knows is eminently sensible and very workable.’
    • ‘It had become standard party propaganda, but now it took on a menacing air as it was used to goad the troops, to whip them into the state of mind in which they would sacrifice anything for the revolution.’
    • ‘Football fans at Sunderland's Stadium of Light are whipped into collective hatred of visiting teams by the playing of Prokofiev's Dance of the Knights from the ballet Romeo and Juliet, itself a tender love story.’
    • ‘However, those same predictions can whip us into frenzy if the fateful deadline looms ahead.’
    • ‘Perversely, such words of steel were meant to calm the American people, not whip them into a vengeful fervour.’
    • ‘He will have his hands full if he intends to whip it into an effective agency.’
    • ‘The opening speech reminded me of Walter Hill's ‘The Warriors’, gathering the gangs together, whipping them into an erotic frenzy.’
    • ‘Large crowds gathered despite the overcast conditions and they were whipped into a storm by the Eurosport cycling expert commentator Mike Smith.’
    • ‘Adolescence is difficult for such people; peer-pressure and hormonal disruption whips them into forced emotion, sends them spinning like that Victorian toy called a whipping-top.’
    • ‘Over the next several months, Marinello whipped them into shape.’
    • ‘It merely serves as a pretext to whip the country into a war frenzy and to justify insertion of large numbers of troops into Mesopotamia.’
    • ‘Wouldn't they see similarities in the way they were whipped into a nationalistic fervour with the current manipulation of public opinion that has seen desperate refugees transformed into terrorists?’
    • ‘I suspect that was the straw that broke the camel's back and whipped them into migratory action, so to speak, because Leah and Jason arrived in Darwin not long afterwards.’
    • ‘After whipping us into a cheering frenzy, Carlson grows suddenly subdued.’
    • ‘With the help of his trainer Percy, Hilary manages to whip Eddie into decent shape and secures a big fight.’
    • ‘The purpose of his visit to nine Arab regimes, plus Turkey and Israel, is to whip them into line behind the war.’
    • ‘If you've decided that you want to win the battle against the bulge, then you're ready for this three-step strategy that can whip you into great shape and help get you on track for a fitter future.’
    • ‘Maybe they're building anticipation, whipping us into such a frenzy that we couldn't wait another day to see what happens to Tony, his family, and his other ‘family.’’
    rouse, stir up, excite, galvanize, electrify, stimulate, inspire, move, fire up, fire the enthusiasm of, fire the imagination of, get someone going, inflame, agitate, goad, provoke
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