Definition of while in English:

while

noun

  • 1A period of time.

    ‘we chatted for a while’
    ‘she retired a little while ago’
    • ‘It is safe to assume that the word had been around for a while before 1611.’
    • ‘At this time kidneys were taken a little while after the donor's heart had stopped and death had been pronounced.’
    • ‘For a while, she watches the merry flames which seem to embody the very spirit of this night.’
    • ‘The matter was referred to London and Paris, and for a while tension between the two countries was extreme.’
    • ‘He opened his eyes and, having watched her for a while, he asked her what she was doing.’
    • ‘After a while, a low grumbling in our stomachs indicated it was time to hit the curry house.’
    • ‘Once you gain the promontory of grandparenthood, these things last for only short whiles, not for 20 straight years like they used to.’
    • ‘Taoism may prolong your life for a while, but by means of its teaching one cannot escape death.’
    • ‘Yet all the while they know where they are and where they are going!’
    • ‘So I sat and flew my tiny little kite for a while and watched the much bigger inflatables and other kites fill the sky above.’
    • ‘I went back and watched TV for a while till Jess wanted to go back to her room.’
    • ‘We spent a while just watching them eat, scratch, yawn, stretch and go about their business.’
    • ‘All this while my family was watching from inside the van, and in full view of all those in line.’
    • ‘After a while, the consensus on how to respond to the examples breaks down and the debate stalls.’
    • ‘There were two bastards in the Jones household for a while - but only one of them was truly Jenny's.’
    • ‘At Ibrox, there is a telly in the ref's room, and I'll maybe watch that for a while.’
    • ‘All the while, she watches Brian's face, alert for signs of pain or discomfort.’
    • ‘Matron allowed me to come too, for a while, to watch, pirouette around and drink a thimbleful of ginger wine.’
    • ‘A baby is born, then there is a rest for a little while, then the contractions should start again.’
    • ‘None the less, for a while it became very difficult for writers to present their views artistically.’
    time, spell, stretch, stint, span, season, interval, period, period of time, length of time, duration, run, phase, stage, term
    patch
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1For some time.
      ‘can I keep it a while?’
      • ‘Again the industry cooled its heels a while and then brought back the same plan.’
  • 2At the same time; meanwhile.

    ‘he starts to draw, talking the while’
    1. 2.1literary During the time that.
      ‘beseeching him, the while his hand she wrung’

conjunction

  • 1During the time that; at the same time as.

    ‘nothing much changed while he was away’
    • ‘They may also accept patients on a temporary basis while they are resident in the practice area.’
    • ‘The victims were attacked while watching a cricket match between India and Pakistan on television.’
    • ‘Can a tradition be borrowed only in part, while leaving out something fundamental to it?’
    • ‘They relate to what people can say or do while participating in a procession or other form of demonstration.’
    • ‘It would not be right to close a chapter about art in the digital era while neglecting the truest offspring of the new media.’
    • ‘Now I'm not going to be able to think of anything else but her ears while watching the movie.’
    • ‘Domitia finds the list while he sleeps, and joins others whose names are there in a conspiracy.’
    • ‘This means that they allow the analyst to code text while working at the computer and to retrieve the coded text.’
    • ‘Pliny the Elder lost his life while visiting Vesuvius during an eruption.’
    • ‘People have argued that Einstein grew up as a scientist while he was developing the general theory.’
    • ‘You can watch a previously-recorded show while recording something else, you see.’
    • ‘Every year a lot of new people are sucked into the media occupations, while at the same time a lot of people leave.’
    • ‘The double receiver means viewers can watch one digital channel while recording another.’
    • ‘The question has been raised whether we were tortured while being investigated.’
    • ‘All of them, like Darwin, had to negotiate ways to work while suffering from ill health.’
    • ‘Sousa's creed as a conductor was to entertain his audience while educating them.’
    • ‘By then, experience had toughened him, while making him more determined than ever to succeed.’
    • ‘The thing that stayed with me while watching the movie was the sense of dread that something was going to happen.’
    • ‘Police have apologised after two brothers were arrested while they were watching a hunt for car thieves.’
    • ‘Officers parked a decoy car with items left in full view while they watched from an unmarked vehicle nearby.’
  • 2Whereas (indicating a contrast)

    ‘one person wants out, while the other wants the relationship to continue’
    • ‘The sky was almost black, while the trees and shrubs where all frosty pink.’
    • ‘All the toes were red while the rest of the foot was white, indicating poor circulation.’
    • ‘This indicates that expression of the transgene occurs in tubers while the endogene seems to be silent.’
    • ‘Black cabbies pay the airport a fee to operate there, while Checker was required to bid for a contract.’
    • ‘O'Boyle is out of contract in the summer, while Thomas still has two years remaining on his deal.’
    • ‘There is a mistaken belief that it is a straight road, while in fact there is a slight bend.’
    • ‘Both in fact were non-rhotic, while the majority of Americans speak with rhotic accents.’
    • ‘Myrtle, for example, is the emblem of love while sweet lavender denotes a loyal heart.’
    • ‘A strange contradiction emerged as the art was praised while those who created it were degraded.’
    • ‘Her husband spends his weekends watching football, while she watches soap operas and Sex and the City.’
    • ‘He was presented with a watch, while his wife Wendy was presented with a bouquet of flowers.’
    • ‘It can absorb the individual as a visit to the cinema can, while watching television can't.’
    • ‘Some contracts offer just protection, while others provide investment links.’
    • ‘This is not a static and unchangeable world where all whites have the goods while blacks do not.’
    • ‘Writing by hand continues to be basic to education while at the same time its value has declined in occupational terms.’
    • ‘Spain is increasing the size of its fishing fleet while ours is contracting.’
    • ‘The main entrance is on the north while another to the south is used by a modern track.’
    • ‘Some sought to contradict him, while others tried, unsuccessfully, to ignore his prying.’
    • ‘Danny Slatter has signed a one-year contract, while Russell Edwards has been released.’
    1. 2.1In spite of the fact that; although.
      ‘while I wouldn't recommend a night-time visit, by day the area is full of interest’
      • ‘Walking lines of kids around the Plateau on a long cord, while cute, cannot be the only option.’
      • ‘The relationship, while exciting and original, had eventually become strained.’
      • ‘The fact remains that, while horses may not die of foot-and-mouth, they do carry the disease.’
      • ‘Thus while we can start with Waltz, we certainly do not want to stop with him.’
      • ‘So the thought of flying, while appealing, was not at the top of my list of things to do.’
      • ‘But while it created room for the diffusion of authority it did not have a place for individualism.’
      • ‘Now, though, while the price of these two has dropped more than two quid, so has the quality.’
      • ‘In fact, while they are labeled as such, they are not really fantasy stories in the genre sense.’
      • ‘In fact, while the experiment was, of necessity, painful, it was far from worthless.’
      • ‘But while one side of the battle is finished, it will not go away.’
      • ‘Peter says while the thought of group therapy may seem daunting, there are many benefits from working this way.’
      • ‘The spray is used to subdue violent offenders and, while painful, does not leave any permanent damage.’
      • ‘I have always thought that Edinburgh, while grand in design, was timid in vision.’
      • ‘Hegel, for example, while not defending war, observed that it was the nursery of the heroic virtues.’
      • ‘Such conditions, while toxic to plants and animals, can be quite cozy for archaeans.’
      • ‘So, while online petitions are useless, as everyone says, surely they can do no harm.’
      • ‘I knew that cat-claws, while wonderful things, cannot get traction on the glass of a mirror.’
      • ‘But while gay couples may be looking to settle down, some find life in Britain difficult.’

relative adverb

  • During which.

    ‘the period while the animal remains alive’
    • ‘It is not just for a relatively short period while physical defects to the property are made good.’
    • ‘There's a moment's freezing silence while her eyebrows contract like thunder.’
    • ‘There were no words confining the cover to a period while actual repairs were taking place.’
    • ‘The result was a lengthy hiatus in the building work while another contractor was sought.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Pass time in a leisurely manner.

    ‘a diversion to while away the long afternoons’
    • ‘A movie seemed like a top idea, a way of hiding in the darkness of a lounge, whiling away the hours.’
    • ‘After a summer whiled away drinking gin and tonic and reading books, I moved to Pittsburgh for lack of anything better to do.’
    • ‘When not in school, the troupe whiles away its time at Arnold's, the local drive-in diner.’
    • ‘These are the best places for whiling away lazy afternoons in amusing, light-hearted conversations with the often-quirky fellow hostel mates.’
    • ‘Anyhow, it's a scorcher of an afternoon, perfect for whiling away a couple of hours in the sunshine.’
    • ‘When not out with Sanura, Kira spent most of her time in her room and whiled the time away by expressing her obsession through her art.’
    • ‘Here you will find a number of great wee shops which are perfect for whiling away an afternoon browsing among the treasures.’
    • ‘But for today's child, vacation no longer means whiling away the time in front of the television, pestering the mother or keeping grandparents on tenterhooks for the most part of the day.’
    • ‘I would have perhaps whiled the time away in such a state had not a scent, borne on the ebony breezes, suddenly caught my attention.’
    • ‘The English Tea House & Restaurant is a sublime slice of colonial luxury; indeed, most visitors wind up whiling the afternoon away within its convivial surroundings rather than just stopping for lunch.’
    • ‘I quite like the thought of it being written in a staff room by bored and bearded school teachers, puffing on pipes and whiling away dreary lunch breaks.’
    • ‘Juniper whiled many a day away in her sitting room, speaking to none, playing absently with the pale rose petals, as soft as the skin of a newborn's cheek.’
    • ‘Many an hour could be whiled away here, eating, drinking, surfing the net, listening to music and chatting up a prospective date.’
    • ‘People sat under parasols outside the cafes, whiling the day away.’
    • ‘In the event, Mara was ousted from his post by the military, and is currently understood to be peacefully whiling his time away on a yacht.’
    • ‘He infiltrates MI5 and prospers at the heart of the establishment, but in the end he is exposed as a spy and whiles away his final days sick, surrounded by empty gin bottles and memories, answering a young reporter's questions.’
    • ‘When boys of their age were seen whiling away their time playing games and wasting their money on watching movies, it is commendable to see these students lending their helping hand to the starving people.’
    • ‘It is where the former snooker superstar, cocaine addict, failed car salesman and landscape gardener, now whiles away his hours.’
    • ‘The 91-year-old from Stockport whiles away her spare time making woolly jumpers - for penguins.’
    pass, spend, occupy, use up, kill, beguile
    View synonyms

preposition

Northern english
  • Until.

    ‘father will be happy while dinner time’

Usage

On the distinction between worth while and worthwhile, see worthwhile. See also awhile

Phrases

  • worth while (or worth one's while)

    • Worth the time or effort spent.

      • ‘It's very complicated and it's not worth their while.’
      • ‘Then they say it wouldn't be worth their while to continue.’
      • ‘I promise to work really hard to make it worth your while.’
      • ‘It will be worth your while to come and get to know other members where you will get a warm welcome.’
      • ‘Prizes will be up for grabs among the entrants so lots of imagination, humour and effort could be well worth your while.’
      • ‘In doing so, I hope to convince you that running for a Student Government Executive Body position will be worth your while.’
      • ‘It turns off voters, new voters, or people who have always wanted to vote and have wondered whether it's worth their while.’
      • ‘Today, discontent tended to make me think it's all a hollow shell, that perhaps all that effort, all that sacrifice, were not worth my while.’
      • ‘You might not agree with everything there, but hopefully you'll find it all provocative, informative, and generally worth your while.’
      • ‘Read it, bookmark it, return to it; it will be much worth your while.’

Origin

Old English hwīl ‘period of time’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wijl, German Weile; the conjunction is an abbreviation of Old English thā hwīle the ‘the while that’.

Pronunciation:

while

/wʌɪl/