Definition of Whiggism in English:

Whiggism

noun

historical
  • See Whig

    • ‘Lansdowne was a Whig grandee and for decades Bowood in Wiltshire and Lansdowne House in London were headquarters of Whiggism.’
    • ‘In 1820 Scott, with other prominent Tories, secretly financed the new Tory journal the Beacon (latter reissued as the Sentinel), whose aim was to assail radical Whiggism.’
    • ‘For the price of Hanoverian identification with Whiggism, albeit a somewhat watery Whiggism, was the permanent alienation of the die-hard ‘country’ Tory families.’
    • ‘One tempting way of picturing the result is to view Whiggism as a kind of metropolitan magnet that represented the interests of the merchants and financiers of London and the magnates of the English heartland.’
    • ‘He denied crossing the political spectrum, declaring that he was never a democrat or republican, but ‘I was a Whig, I admit, till I was ashamed of Whiggism.’’

Pronunciation

Whiggism

/ˈwɪɡɪz(ə)m/