Definition of whereas in English:

whereas

conjunction

  • 1In contrast or comparison with the fact that.

    ‘you treat the matter lightly, whereas I myself was never more serious’
    • ‘This measure of right and left has not changed in hundreds of years, whereas specific policies have.’
    • ‘The Arctic is an ocean basin with peripheral continents, whereas the Antarctic is continental.’
    • ‘Now that's brave, whereas sitting here with cancer, typing a magazine article, is not.’
    • ‘He lived through his era, whereas so many of his friends died in racing accidents.’
    • ‘It is possible for the non-bidding team to win the game if they reach the target whereas the bidders are still below it.’
    • ‘A dark room will trigger less light, whereas a bright room will drive more light output.’
    • ‘To the north, the second lava unit is by far the thickest, whereas the older unit is only 2 m thick.’
    • ‘Nanjing has also in the past been the capital of China, whereas now Beijing has that role.’
    • ‘It was based on polar coordinates whereas earlier instruments were based on cartesian coordinates.’
    • ‘A nonalignable difference is that a bus has a schedule whereas a bicycle does not.’
    • ‘The port was well fortified and defended, whereas the Vendéans had no siege train.’
    • ‘We can make this in minutes; whereas previously it would take hours to make this part.’
    • ‘Someone in prison is still able to contribute something to society whereas someone executed cannot.’
    • ‘We have natural light whereas working underground we had artificial light.’
    • ‘Berti wants as many of them as possible, whereas I deliberately minimised them.’
    • ‘At the beginning of this debate Stephen said that he thinks that he is a positivist, whereas I am a Platonist.’
    • ‘The supernatant was kept in stock whereas the residue was sequentially extracted three times.’
    • ‘Her car had been found on the Yorkshire moors, whereas she'd reappeared about fifty miles from there.’
    • ‘Cooking for me is like putting on a show - I like to improvise, whereas Nicky is much more precise.’
    • ‘She's the one who is moving on whereas her parents are stuck with the story, are stuck in the past.’
    1. 1.1 (especially in legal preambles) taking into consideration the fact that.
      • ‘Thus Mr Smith is now the respondent to this appeal, whereas Mr Clark was the claimant below.’
      • ‘The restoration procedure is discretionary, whereas the challenge to the forfeiture is not.’
      • ‘Negligence depends on a breach of duty, whereas contributory negligence does not.’
      • ‘The desks have damaged the walls, whereas a more appropriate choice could have prevented such damage.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from where + as.

Pronunciation

whereas

/wɛːrˈaz/