Definition of what the hell in English:

what the hell

phrase

  • 1informal It doesn't matter.

    ‘you're already going to be home late, so what the hell’
    • ‘I'm sure more blogs will comment on this before long, but what the hell, I'm still going to.’
    • ‘I can't think of much to celebrate on that front but what the hell, it's a damn decent bottle of red.’
    • ‘As I shut the door, I looked at the still full bowl of sweets and thought, what the hell.’
    • ‘So I don't get much chance to eat, never mind see my family, but what the hell?’
    • ‘I am the typical poor friend and relative who leaches off others, but what the hell, I go.’
    • ‘He ran the race illegally, changed the rules to suit himself, but he came first so what the hell.’
    • ‘At first I didn't want to, didn't really see the point but then I thought what the hell.’
    • ‘I get the feeling I may encounter some resistance to this choice, but what the hell.’
    • ‘It was a stupid decision, but what the hell, it was made, and should have been implemented.’
    • ‘At this rate, the house will already be warm by the time it happens, but what the hell.’
    • ‘He was a little baffled as to why anyone would want to, but I say what the hell.’
    • ‘It's more than we can really afford, but what the hell, we don't do this every day.’
    • ‘That doesn't sound very wise and mature to me, but what the hell, you got to do what you got to do.’
    • ‘You're already going to be home late, so what the hell, take it easy, give your weary eyes and brain a break.’
    • ‘I had no desire to ever do something like that, but I said what the hell and took it.’
    • ‘My life is really too shallow and boring for a blog but what the hell, nobody actually had to read it.’
    • ‘I had to go past it again the other day, so I thought, what the hell, give it a try.’
    • ‘What the hell - if the stuff doesn't work, it'll make my flat look cool.’
    • ‘I had to get out of bed to cook it but what the hell, Mrs Sticker was appreciative.’
  • 2Used to express anger, contempt, or disbelief.

    ‘What the hell, Jane? You're hanging me out to dry?’