Definition of wet in English:

wet

adjectivewetter, wettest

  • 1Covered or saturated with water or another liquid.

    ‘she followed, slipping on the wet rock’
    • ‘By nightfall there were 20 climbers crowding the shelter and the walls were covered with wet clothes.’
    • ‘I'm noticing that the floor is wet - entirely covered in dark liquid.’
    • ‘To avoid tissue dehydration during measurements, the walls of the pressure chamber were covered with wet filter paper.’
    • ‘His wheel rims were already wet from the water already in the road and, if anything, he continued to pick up speed.’
    • ‘Tears slipped down his cheeks leaving wet splotches on the cover.’
    • ‘My little brother Andrew stopped in mid-step and wiped his mouth still wet with water, as the adults looked at him in absolute surprise.’
    • ‘Sarah was cold and her clothes where wet and covered in mud.’
    • ‘So managing the water from wet cutting is well worth it.’
    • ‘Use of a wet towel or dripping water to induce a perception of suffocating.’
    • ‘You can also cover them with wet towels or sheets and fan them until it is possible to get them to a hospital or doctor.’
    • ‘The main type of central heating system is wet - where hot water is circulated through pipes and goes to radiators with valves that control the amount of time it spends there.’
    • ‘Immediately remove clothing that has become saturated with wet concrete.’
    • ‘Their bodies were bloody, contorted and covered with wet leaves.’
    • ‘The sidewalks are always wet and covered in magazines and flyers no one bothers to pick up.’
    • ‘I told my son to get my garden gloves, and then we covered ourselves in wet towels and got her out but by then it was too late.’
    • ‘Her outfit is utterly sopping wet and covered with sludge; after all, she had to cut across more than a few people's backyard to get here.’
    • ‘Cover them with wet newspaper to keep them moist while dormant.’
    • ‘I have seen them wet with sea water, glistening in the sun.’
    • ‘His vision swam and blurred in front of him, the land seeming to be covered in wet lumps all around him.’
    • ‘The cages were covered with wet marsh grass to minimize mortality from desiccation and heat stress during the lowtide period.’
    damp, dampened, moist, moistened
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of the weather) rainy.
      ‘a wet, windy evening’
      • ‘But reality is that no soft shell as comfortable as the Serendipity will keep you dry in a torrential rain or hours of wet sleet.’
      • ‘Another spell of mild, wet and fairly windy weather is expected on Thursday.’
      • ‘Despite wet and windy weather last week, the vehicle terminal at the port here reached a new record, handling 37 containers per working hour.’
      • ‘But the agency says that if this prediction proves correct, it might only cause a problem if the cold weather is also wet - causing heavy snowfall in the hills.’
      • ‘wind is important in spreading diseases: for example bacterial blight is spread in wet, windy weather.’
      • ‘Luck they had indoor entertainment as weather was extremely wet and windy.’
      • ‘But with brighter, wet and windy weather forecast for tomorrow, motorists in the county should not have to face the fog again.’
      • ‘The surface of a lava flow weathers, particularly in wet climates, to form a rich, reddish volcanic soil, called a bole.’
      • ‘The Asian Garden thrives in winter, when the weather is wet and cool.’
      • ‘Sometimes they were sent them home early if the weather was too wet, but only once did they get sent home because it was too hot!’
      • ‘Staking or supporting early in the growing season is best and can help direct plant growth, encourage better flower displays and prevent damage during wet and windy weather.’
      • ‘That weekend it was dreadful weather, it was wet, it was cold, it was windy, and that just made our emotions even more hard to bear.’
      • ‘It's that time of year in the northern hemisphere, the nights are drawing in, the clocks going back, and the weather is wet and awful.’
      • ‘What made it more remarkable was the weather, which was wet, cold and very windy, with the odd snow shower thrown in for good measure.’
      • ‘It will be mainly dry for a time on Wednesday, with sunny spells, but wet and windy weather will develop later.’
      • ‘The weather is fairly wet but so far has not been very cold which is a good thing.’
      • ‘The weather was wet, but visibility was still good.’
      • ‘But normally if the weather was wet, my Lord, no you wouldn't have done it satisfactorily at all.’
      • ‘A word of warning, if the weather is wet, the lane down to these pegs, normally easy, can become dangerous!’
      • ‘About 10,000 people braved wet and windy weather to attend the ceremony at the Margraten cemetery in the southern Netherlands.’
      rainy, raining, pouring, teeming, showery, drizzly, drizzling
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 (of paint, ink, plaster, or a similar substance) not yet having dried or hardened.
      ‘the waterproofer can easily be washed off while it is still wet’
      • ‘The smell of fresh breads, wet ink, melting glass, new silks and a lot of currency drifted about from the many open stalls.’
      • ‘The sign, on the front step of the home in London Road, Benfleet, had been placed there to warn people about wet paint on the newly decorated front door.’
      • ‘Like wet plaster of Paris hardening in a glass jar, salt crystals that have incorporated water can also expand to crack their container.’
      • ‘The one working on the side seemed to comb the wet plaster into horizontal furrows, while the one working on the back preferred a smooth finish.’
      • ‘Using the ink-soaked felt, tap it over the tag while the gold ink is still wet.’
      • ‘The wall was splayed with fresh graffiti and the post was dripping with wet spray paint.’
      • ‘He would cut a negative into wet sand and pour plaster into the sand mold.’
      • ‘The characteristic aspect of Christina's style is that of using the fluid motion of wet paint in a graceful pattern, before letting it finally dry.’
      • ‘It remains to be seen whether the glitter will stay stuck to the prints as I just sprinkled it onto the wet ink.’
      • ‘Masking tape takes ages to apply, it never comes off cleanly and it doesn't even mask off wet paint effectively.’
      • ‘The method is similar to what is called dry fresco in Europe, as the paints are applied to a dry surface, not wet plaster as in true fresco.’
      • ‘Oil paint is a wet mixture of pigments in an oily medium.’
      • ‘And I remember when it was here in Atlanta, you wanted to be careful about leaning against a post for fear the paint was still wet.’
      • ‘While the paint and paper are still wet, place a piece of plastic wrap on top of the painted section, making sure the wrap is wrinkled.’
      • ‘The cupola and the concrete construction were corroded, the masonry was wet, and plaster work was peeling off.’
      • ‘A classic fresco is an original image that was painted directly on a wall of wet plaster using natural pigments.’
      • ‘This led me to use only pencil and ballpoint pens and to slip in a piece of kitchen towel to soak up wet ink.’
      • ‘You can also use the cleaner for wet paint on clothing, but launder clothes immediately after application.’
      • ‘Painting into wet plaster with water soluble pigments is one of the most difficult of all challenges a painter can face.’
      • ‘Instead of using the tried and tested method (egg tempera on wet plaster), however, he used a paint of his own invention.’
      sticky, not set, not hardened, not hard, tacky
      aqueous, watery, sloppy
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 (of a baby or young child) having urinated in its nappy or underwear.
      ‘the baby was wet and needed changing’
      • ‘Unless I can conquer my competitive instincts, there'll be a lot of very wet toddlers and it'll all end in tears.’
      • ‘Someone once said that the only person who welcomes change is a wet baby.’
      • ‘I believe there is no baby there, but I'm willing to have a wet infant hauled into view.’
      • ‘Anny picks up the wet nappy and tiptoes out of the room.’
      • ‘They have to stay in a wet nappy longer and wear clothes with food down the front.’
    4. 1.4 Involving the use of water or liquid.
      ‘wet methods of photography’
      • ‘Kistler was trying to prove that a gel contains a continuous solid network of the same size and shape as the wet gel.’
      • ‘Known as the wet method, a building is sprayed with water as it is leveled.’
      • ‘Consider the following precautions when selecting a wet cleaning method.’
      • ‘Typically, the choice of a wet method requires specific knowledge about the sample as well as the level of accuracy required.’
      • ‘Tissue P status was analysed after wet digestion by the molybdate blue method.’
      • ‘Another solution to this problem is to use wet methods or ‘dustless’ vacuum tools.’
    5. 1.5Nautical (of a ship) liable to take in water over her bows or sides.
  • 2British informal Showing a lack of forcefulness or strength of character; feeble.

    ‘they thought the cadets were a bit wet’
    feeble, silly, weak, foolish, inept, ineffective, ineffectual, effete, soft, namby-pamby, timid, timorous, spiritless, cowardly, spineless
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Conservative with liberal tendencies, especially as regarded by right-wing Conservatives.
      ‘they came across as the most liberal or wet members of the government’
      • ‘Call me a wet Guardianista liberal, but a bit of peace, love and understanding wouldn't go astray.’
      • ‘I think there's a good chunk of wet liberal New Labour angst behind it all.’
      • ‘As a died-in-the-wool wet liberal, I'm coming from an altogether different place than Mr. Philips.’
      • ‘I'm of the mind this is a good thing, but I am a wet wooly liberal.’
      • ‘I know some wet urban liberals who are thinking of voting for the Maori Party.’
      • ‘The wet Liberals are a pathetic and spineless bunch who are wholly subservient to government discipline and their own ambition in equal measure.’
      • ‘To the wet bleeding heart liberals, I say get a life and do something useful for a change.’
  • 3informal (of a country or region or of its legislation) allowing the free sale of alcoholic drink.

    1. 3.1 (of a person) addicted to or drinking alcohol.
      ‘our programme depends on our willingness to help other alcoholics, both wet and dry’

verbwetted, wets, wetting

[with object]
  • 1Cover or touch with liquid; moisten.

    ‘he wetted a finger and flicked through the pages’
    • ‘Dip both ends into the liquid candle wax so the whole thing is wetted, then wait for it to harden (or chill it in your drink.)’
    • ‘Of course, plenty of travelers also arrive via the tarmac, ready to reel in monster tuna, trek the hills, and take in the views without wetting a toe.’
    • ‘Her short black hair had been carefully wetted down, and her usual leathers covered the intense fighter's form.’
    • ‘The waterskin slipped through Darteil's fingers, wetting his shirt.’
    • ‘She went to the sink and wet a towel to clean Matty's face which was covered with spaghetti.’
    • ‘Water dripped from the ceiling, creating puddles, wetting the carpet and ruining the already rotted woodwork.’
    • ‘Avoid wetting the foliage and thin out overcrowded growth.’
    • ‘He screwed up his eyes and studied the clouds, wet a finger and held it up, picked a blade of grass and felt it between finger and thumb, smelt it.’
    • ‘If they seem bent and not curled, a good tip is wetting a Q-Tip and touching it to your lashes, before applying the mascara.’
    • ‘He uses a drip irrigation system to avoid wetting the leaves, which could promote the growth of fungi.’
    • ‘Seconds later, He wet his finger and stuck it in the ear of an unsuspecting TV reporter.’
    • ‘After the application of the repellent, subjects were instructed not to rub, touch, or wet the treated arm.’
    • ‘The aspiration is the puff of air that you can feel if you wet your finger and hold it in front of your mouth when you say pot in English.’
    • ‘Concerned, I checked it and found that it only wet the cover over the pillow and did not seep to the pillow itself.’
    • ‘Sand was deposited by wind or water, and briefly wetted by liquid water that evaporated, forming the sulfate cement.’
    • ‘Franklin would pump the treadle, wet his fingers, and stroke the rims of the bowls, almost as if playing notes on the piano.’
    • ‘But tension is mounting as recreational fishers complain about not being able to find room on the water to wet their lines.’
    • ‘Paddy, after a little thought and wet his finger and smudged the trunk of each of the trees.’
    • ‘She wetted the tip of her finger, counted out five tens and dropped them into the metal money scoop.’
    • ‘His form slowly turned and he looked at Jessica expectantly, she ran to him, through the mud, soaking her skirts and wetting her hair, then she held him.’
    dampen, damp, moisten, humidify
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (especially of a baby or young child) urinate in or on.
      ‘while dreaming the child wet the bed’
      • ‘We find children who are wetting their beds and haven't done it before.’
      • ‘Enuresis is classed as primary when the child has never been persistently dry through the night and as secondary when the child starts wetting the bed after one year of continence.’
      • ‘At five years, more than one in six children still wet the bed.’
      • ‘A few children still have trouble with wetting the bed at night.’
      • ‘Having large amounts of liquid before going to bed can make most children wet the bed.’
      • ‘The family should keep track of how many times the child voids during the day and how many nights the child wets the bed.’
      • ‘His outbursts of anger were so frightening, one of his fellow teachers said, that two children had wet their pants.’
      • ‘The concept of using an alarm that emits a sound when a child wets the bed was first introduced in 1938.’
      • ‘If your child still wets the bed regularly, ask the doctor about ways to help decrease this behavior.’
      • ‘But whenever one of our children wet the bed, he claimed that they were lazy, too lazy to get up, go to the bathroom.’
      • ‘He still wets the bed during nights not regularly but frequently, mostly during winter when he goes to bed without going to the bathroom.’
      • ‘‘One young child wet the bed one night and was forced to walk round with a sandwich board over him the next day saying what he had done,’ she said.’
      • ‘This back and forth happens once or twice more, and then there's a little to-do because the tyke has wet the little pants she is wearing.’
      • ‘Alison said one of her children recently wet the bed, so they had to spend the night on the sofa and floor.’
      • ‘If both parents wet the bed when they were young, it's very likely that their child will as well.’
      • ‘My six-year-old daughter has started wetting the bed.’
      • ‘Would you blame a coma victim for wetting the bed?’
      • ‘Estimates are that 20 per cent of all five-year-olds wet the bed.’
      • ‘One in ten children is still wetting the bed by the age of five.’
      • ‘She said Luke had become withdrawn since the bullying, preferring to stay indoors, sleeping till late in the afternoon and wetting the bed regularly.’
    2. 1.2wet oneself Urinate involuntarily.
      ‘she was going to wet herself from fear’
      • ‘Then we turned round and his missus had returned and was wetting herself laughing at us.’
      • ‘The driver, in so much fear that he probably wet himself, sped away from the courthouse.’
      • ‘He said his client became uncooperative at the police station after she was stopped from using the toilet and suffered the humiliation of wetting herself in front of officers.’
      • ‘Panic stations alerted, so I soused it avec water, and was sat there wetting myself while trying to dry it with the hairdryer.’
      • ‘Is it directed by a veteran actor/star who Hollywood wets itself over?’
      • ‘He had to wear a bag attached to his penis for fear of wetting himself because he could not say he wanted the toilet.’
      • ‘We collapsed in fits, the tutor had overheard and was almost wetting herself, and the 5 others were demanding to know what we'd said.’
      • ‘It's usually the last words you hear before the punch lands, your head hits the floor and you wet yourself with fear.’
      • ‘This was unfortunate for everyone around us as we spent the rest of the week quoting lines from the film and almost wetting ourselves while all else wondered what was going on.’
      • ‘I know at least one person in the UK will be wetting themselves at the prospect of watching this show every night.’
      • ‘Sky almost wets herself with glee when he enters the classroom.’
      • ‘I manage to cope with the indignity well, despite the patients and nurses almost wetting themselves with laughter at the sight of me squirming as the needle is inserted.’
      • ‘Their ill - treatment of Victoria included beating her with a bicycle chain, tying her up and wrapping her in bin liners to prevent her wetting herself.’
      • ‘I even remember almost wetting myself once because I wouldn't use the school toilets after I'd heard the tale about the old care-taker who haunted the place.’
      • ‘For a movie that wets itself over the power of imagination, it doesn't show much creativity of its own.’
      • ‘However if a child has been wet from birth, always wets himself / herself day and night, or never achieved toilet training, then it is essential to seek medical help.’
      • ‘Thankfully when the doctor tried to set my bones I conveniently wet myself and passed out with the pain.’
      • ‘Many of us are soon going to be afraid of a good belly laugh - for fear of wetting ourselves in public.’
      • ‘For the last two years, I've been wetting myself when I laugh.’
      • ‘You can well imagine a young lad, his first time in battle, wetting himself with fear.’
    3. 1.3dialect Infuse (tea) by pouring on boiling water.
      ‘she said she'd wet the tea immediately because they must be parched’

nounPlural wets

  • 1mass noun Liquid that makes something damp.

    ‘I could feel the wet of his tears’
    • ‘There's far too much wet around and I think it's softened my brain.’
    • ‘Sometimes he looks really cute and appealing, and then others he looks like he's been ridden hard and put away wet.’
    • ‘We run together down windows, streaming and sobbing and smashed into one big wet.’
    wetness, damp, dampness, moisture, moistness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1the wet Rainy weather.
      ‘the race was held in the wet’
      • ‘His head was down and his ears back, his coat somewhat darker with the wet.’
      rain, rains, drizzle, damp weather, rainy weather, showery weather, wet weather, precipitation, spray, dew, damp
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2British informal count noun A drink.
      ‘I took a wet from my bottle’
  • 2British informal A person lacking forcefulness or strength of character.

    ‘there are sorts who look like gangsters and sorts who look like wets’
    namby-pamby, weakling, milksop, milquetoast, baby
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A Conservative with liberal tendencies.
      ‘the wets favoured a change in economic policy’
      • ‘With her eyes bulged in terror, her face wet with perspiration, and her mouth gaping in a wide O, she didn't look very sultry at all.’
      • ‘On screen, their national spokesmen and women smile charmingly and portray themselves as decent people who may be a bit wet but are unlike the other politicians.’
      • ‘On the new US imperialism, he is an impeccable neoconservative; on the death penalty he is a liberal; on the Euro he is with the Tory wets and (some of) New Labour.’
      • ‘Tory wets will enthuse about social justice and inclusivity like simpering liberals.’
      • ‘I must say, the Labor Party isn't Robinson Crusoe - the Liberals have got their factions, the wets and the dries, even the Nats - god help us - have got factions as well.’
      • ‘It was largely as a result of the confused policy direction of the wets that did so much to hasten the Conservative decline in the 1990s.’
      • ‘I'm a conservative wet if you would like to apply a label.’
      • ‘Margaret Thatcher used the re-shuffle as an act of terror, exterminating wets and savaging useful fall guys.’
      • ‘Andretti in the wet on Sunday scored wins in the Skip Barber National double-header at Road’
      • ‘They should stop telling themselves that it's good enough to be the wets or progressives in political parties which are now openly dedicated to illiberal ends.’
      • ‘The outspoken wet in a dry, dry Liberal Party was fronting the official celebrations for this week's centenary of female suffrage.’
      • ‘But he says the divide is no longer between liberals and conservatives, or economic wets and dries.’
      • ‘For many people it was the death of Liberalism as prominent wets left soon after.’
  • 3US A person opposed to the prohibition of alcohol.

Phrases

  • all wet

    • Completely wrong.

      ‘I may be all wet on this point’
      • ‘You don't have to be a ‘Biblical scholar’ to know that what you wrote was all wet.’
      • ‘Their publishers are all wet about copyright.’
      • ‘By the way, most people think Roberts is all wet.’
      • ‘If the polls are all wet and the final vote breaks sharply one way or the other, people will want to claim the election as a historic watershed.’
      • ‘Jeff actually knows what he's talking about, thinks I'm all wet on this one.’
      • ‘I suppose we could just thank our lucky stars that all the negative prognostications were all wet and leave it at that.’
      • ‘Your discussion of the intellectual property debate is all wet.’
      • ‘No sooner does the Consultant Debunking Unit dip its toe back into the waters of consulting-speak than it stumbles onto jargon that turns out to be all wet.’
      • ‘But up next, Coke's plans to sell bottled water overseas are all wet.’
      • ‘Since I'm not an economist, I might be all wet about this.’
  • wet the baby's head

    • informal Celebrate a baby's birth with a drink, typically an alcoholic one.

      • ‘No, not that, I did that with Muriel, John and Gus last night - you know, went for a drink to celebrate wetting the baby's head.’
      • ‘We definitely wet the baby's head afterwards, then the team came back to our house.’
      • ‘It was a busy evening wetting the baby's head, which the father's head knew about the next morning, but he wishes to thank everyone for their kind words, and their help in welcoming the new arrival.’
      • ‘Your hospital bag is as much a tradition of the childbirth experience as is ‘wetting the baby's head’.’
      • ‘As for whether I'll be having a traditional boy's night out to wet the baby's head well, I'm always having a boy's night out!’
      • ‘Perhaps, some time later (as they do in Champagne to bring good fortune) one may be used to wet the baby's head.’
      • ‘At least I managed to wet the baby's head, even if it was with cola.’
      • ‘Many of you may want to help her wet the baby's head at the plush casual eatery next to Bar 38, off Coney Street, which is opening this weekend.’
  • wet behind the ears

    • informal Lacking experience; immature.

      ‘he's a nice young fellow but a bit wet behind the ears’
      • ‘The peak and valleys paint a visual picture of the sound the newborn universe made when it was still wet behind the ears, a mere 300,000 years after its birth in a big bang.’
      • ‘When I moved to from the East Coast to California in 1997, I was wet behind the ears, right out of college, and I knew I was kinky.’
      • ‘Nowadays, 32 seems a bit wet behind the ears to me, but from memory it is about the age that you start to feel like the oldest swinger in town when you step inside a nightclub.’
      • ‘Tell me son have you ever cut turf before, following up with, it's just that you look a bit wet behind the ears for this job.’
      • ‘A bit wet behind the ears, and failed to recreate from a place in the starting line-up what he achieved coming off the bench against Tunisia.’
      • ‘It seems a funny thing to ask, but they are clearly a little wet behind the ears.’
      • ‘The new breed of politicians should no longer be wet behind the ears and need to start acting like experienced rulers.’
      • ‘That's not to say that the Green movement is admitting to being wet behind the ears.’
      • ‘At last I was a specialist in health psychology, but still a bit wet behind the ears professionally.’
      • ‘I went out as a sort of wet behind the ears completely ignorant 21 year old and spent 18 months in Madagascar.’
  • wet through (or to the skin)

    • With one's clothes soaked; completely drenched.

      ‘she was wet through and felt cold’
      • ‘She raised her head, and a rush of air cooled the patch of skin on Alex's shoulder that had been wet through his shirt by her tears.’
      • ‘He was wet through so took off most of his clothes and emptied his pockets, to let everything dry off.’
      • ‘By the end of it we were wet to the skin and tired, but happy and all jumped out.’
      • ‘I think it was this weekend when I woke up to discover that my futon was actually damp, wet through from my sweating into it during the night.’
      • ‘Then they won't be sitting in classrooms wet through and steaming.’
      • ‘There were more than 5,000 fans squeezed into the ground and most of them got wet through.’
      • ‘The season also throws up stark images of pedestrians, motorists and just about everyone scurrying for cover and kids wet to the skin plying paper boats.’
      • ‘Then the water was shallow enough to stand up in, and he waded in towards land, his dark wool hose streaming with water and the linen wrap about his wound wet through.’
      • ‘The wool tunic and leggings on the man nearest me is wet through, his cap is flattened to his head.’
      • ‘When they travelled miles to attend Mass on a Sunday morning, often in weather conditions that had them either wet to the skin or blue with the cold when they arrived at their place of worship.’
  • wet one's whistle

    • informal Have a drink.

      ‘they meet ostensibly to discuss politics, but also to wet their whistles with brandy and soda’
      • ‘Allowing film buffs to wet their whistle while they watch is one small step along the road to York's cherished goal: civilised drinking.’
      • ‘Well, how about keeping me company while I wet my whistle?’
      • ‘A heat wave has descended on Central Europe, so I decide to wet my whistle with a drink in the Westec Saloon, hoping, as I've been promised, that I'll hear some good live music.’
      • ‘Only too happy to wet his whistle, he had two cases dispatched to his London offices yesterday.’
      • ‘Office workers at Monks Cross who are hoping to wet their whistle after work are going to be waiting for a long time - as a bar or restaurant is not planned for the site for over 18 months.’
      • ‘Emergency service workers struggle to make due under budgetary constraints set by a premier more interested in wetting his whistle than his forests.’
      • ‘Because beer drinking is popular, to say the least, there are hundreds of bier halles and biergartens where you can wet your whistle.’
      drink, swallow, gulp, gulp down, guzzle, slurp, attack, down, drink down, drink up, force down, get down, finish off, polish off, drain, empty, imbibe, have, take, partake of, ingest, consume, sup, sip, lap
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English wǣt (adjective and noun), wǣtan (verb); related to water.

Pronunciation

wet

/wɛt/