Definition of welcome in English:

welcome

noun

  • 1An instance or manner of greeting someone.

    ‘you will receive a warm welcome’
    mass noun ‘he went to meet them with his hand stretched out in welcome’
    • ‘His Heathrow welcome would have pleased either Michael Jackson or Princess Di.’
    • ‘The other people in the room immediately extended their happy welcome with smiles all around.’
    • ‘He and the team did however promise a tough welcome to each and every side visiting Cross Green next season.’
    • ‘In Korea, like Japan, walking into a shop or restaurant will usually result in a hail of welcomes and other ritualized greetings from the employees.’
    • ‘Regardless of that result, the team are still likely to receive a warm welcome when they return to the Showgrounds on Saturday to face Limerick.’
    • ‘A warm welcome is extended to the people who have come to live in the parish.’
    • ‘Some are seeking asylum and are looking for welcome and encouragement from people in rural areas.’
    • ‘I am most grateful for your warm welcome, in the tradition of hospitality so cherished by the people of this region.’
    • ‘The duo received a warm welcome as they took to the streets of Carlow.’
    • ‘Daniels thanked all those present for their warm welcome.’
    • ‘He is unlikely to receive the warmest of welcomes.’
    • ‘He said the team have already received a warm welcome on the streets.’
    • ‘Did you ever expect that your novel would receive such a warm welcome from the literary circles here?’
    • ‘Greeted not with the smiles and welcomes I had so recently been accustomed to and appreciated so well, I was directed to a hut.’
    • ‘Judi's welcome is warm and inviting and she has an excellent knowledge of the surrounding area.’
    • ‘He will not receive a warm welcome from the larger British public.’
    • ‘There is also no question about the friendliness of the welcome visitors receive here.’
    • ‘During our stay in Bahrain, we were accorded a warm welcome.’
    greeting, salutation, hail, welcoming
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A pleased or approving reaction.
      ‘the announcement received an immediate welcome from childcare agencies’
      • ‘Martin's plan was given a generally positive welcome in the immediate aftermath of its publication.’
      • ‘Nonetheless, the plan has received a cool welcome from many agencies.’

exclamation

  • Used to greet someone in a polite or friendly way.

    ‘welcome to the Wildlife Park’
    • ‘If you're reading this, especially if you're a first time reader: welcome!’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Greet (someone arriving) in a polite or friendly way.

    ‘hotels should welcome guests in their own language’
    ‘a welcoming smile’
    • ‘Her mother said everyone in Limerick had been welcoming and friendly since they arrived.’
    • ‘All visitors are welcomed with a song and the teachers are all known by their first names.’
    • ‘Warm-hearted local people welcome visitors, inviting them to stroll around their buildings.’
    • ‘We are met with smiles and welcoming greetings, a bit of small talk, and a friendly goodbye.’
    • ‘They should be reducing all charges and welcoming visitors into the West.’
    • ‘The website has a very friendly and welcoming layout.’
    • ‘The staff and teachers couldn't have been more friendly or more welcoming.’
    • ‘It had a nice, homely atmosphere to it, and seemed friendly and welcoming.’
    • ‘In a time when they were trying to look after their own people and welcoming tourists, they were going about it the wrong way.’
    • ‘The cottage is warm and comfortable throughout, offering guests a peaceful, welcoming atmosphere.’
    • ‘Watanabe raised his hands with smile as supporters welcomed them with applause.’
    • ‘One of the keys to hospitable service is greeting people with a smile and welcoming attitude.’
    • ‘As they walked around town countless neighbors and passers-by greeted them happily and welcomed Jude home.’
    • ‘Instead of displaying anger or jealousy, they welcome the girl into their family and treat her like a sister.’
    • ‘A beautiful lamp welcomes visitors at the entrance.’
    • ‘He was welcomed on to the pitch at half-time to receive a commemorative plaque.’
    • ‘You all are blessed to belong to a town that is so welcoming and friendly.’
    • ‘They welcomed the journalists who arrived in their beleaguered country to tell their story.’
    • ‘As always we were warmly welcomed by the people of Haworth, and, despite the rain, we had a good time on the walk.’
    • ‘On the next island, the people greeted the sailors, welcoming them with offers of their fruit.’
    • ‘He can currently be seen in the supermarket's TV advert welcoming people to the store and handing out cookies to customers.’
    • ‘It is a very friendly and welcoming community and I think he enjoyed meeting the people there.’
    • ‘However, his family welcome him with open arms and a feast, so glad are they to have him back.’
    • ‘The Macphersons welcomed their first visitors two years ago and have never looked back.’
    • ‘There were many happy faces there from home, all delighted to welcome the touring party.’
    • ‘A group arriving to welcome them was appearing from the town, as the rest of the soldiers departed their ships.’
    • ‘The ebullient chef met us at the door, glad to welcome his first customers of the evening.’
    • ‘I did my best to be friendly and welcoming but still he would not stay and would take no food or clothing.’
    • ‘Thomas also suggested that the work of Church youth groups had promoted a friendly, welcoming, atmosphere.’
    • ‘I welcome them with a smile and we head back into the living room.’
    • ‘At the weekend 630 visitors were welcomed to the monthly open day, the biggest turnout for years.’
    • ‘The atmosphere and the tone you set was so friendly and welcoming.’
    • ‘When guests visit you, it is polite to welcome them with kind words and serve them what you have.’
    • ‘We must ensure that the city welcomes these visitors with open arms.’
    • ‘The President was warmly welcomed by several hundred people on her visit to the town.’
    greet, say hello to, salute, bid someone welcome, play host to, play hostess to, show hospitality to, receive, meet, embrace, receive with open arms, roll out the red carpet for, fete
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Be glad to entertain (someone) or receive (something)
      ‘we welcome any comments’
      • ‘We both welcome and encourage inquiries from people who would like to either use our services or find out more about volunteering for them.’
      • ‘Most tower captains are glad to welcome visitors, explain what happens and offer to teach learners.’
      • ‘You have no need to worry, we, the Asheri, are a people that welcomes visitors.’
      • ‘It says the society welcomes people from all walks of life and backgrounds.’
      • ‘The association encourages and welcomes new members.’
      • ‘The club welcomes people of all abilities and age groups to come along.’
      • ‘New plans to overhaul learning for teenagers were today welcomed in Bradford.’
      • ‘The group welcomes new members and invite people to come along at 8.15 pm.’
      • ‘If Kendal welcomes visitors and promotes tourism perhaps its district council needs to be a little more helpful.’
      • ‘They welcome new members and ideas on how best to entertain the visitors when they arrive in September.’
      • ‘In addition to welcoming visitors, the restored house will also host literary evenings and celebrations.’
      • ‘Having picked up the sport just three years ago herself, Barling stresses that the club welcomes people of all ages and skill levels.’
      • ‘The Gallery welcomes visitors seven day a week, between the hours of 9am and 11 pm.’
    2. 1.2 React with pleasure or approval to (an event or development)
      ‘the bank's decision to cut its rates was widely welcomed’
      • ‘She particularly welcomed the new development of providing advice to those arrested.’
      • ‘Last night a spokeswoman said it welcomed the report and accepted the findings.’
      • ‘We would welcome the development of quality criteria more appropriate for psychological treatment trials.’
      • ‘Mr. Rajeev says the idea to form the club had been welcomed by his friends when he first floated it.’
      • ‘I remember an elderly friend nearby who would welcome a visit.’
      • ‘The coup was widely welcomed by the population, who hope for both their wages and for elections.’
      • ‘I have a feeling that this newsletter is going to be pretty short, which most readers will welcome!’
      • ‘Having requested such a debate in advance of Mr Adams' proposal, the Green Party welcomes these recent developments.’
      • ‘The opposition parties then welcomed the fresh start for the assembly.’
      • ‘I too welcome these developments, but more warily.’
      • ‘The Greenwich Society says it would welcome a mixed-use development of residential properties, niche shops and community facilities.’
      • ‘He said yesterday: ‘I welcome any development that will create a diverse press.’’
      • ‘Employers generally welcome moves to allow people to work beyond 65 provided it is by mutual agreement.’
      • ‘We are coming to the end of the enterprise network review process and we welcome the conclusions.’
      • ‘I am grateful for all donations and would welcome any fundraising events to help the work of the Arthritis Research Campaign.’
      • ‘The service welcomes and encourages feedback from callers and clinicians.’
      • ‘Local cancer group campaigner Jane Bailey has welcomed the planned development.’
      • ‘She welcomed the increase in maintenance grant, which was long overdue.’
      • ‘Perhaps there is an elderly person in your area who may be lonely and would welcome a friendly gesture to join you on the trip.’
      express pleasure at, express satisfaction at, be pleased by, be glad about, take pleasure in, approve of, appreciate, accept, embrace
      View synonyms

adjective

  • 1(of a guest or new arrival) gladly received.

    ‘I'm pleased to see you, lad—you're welcome’
    • ‘I hope that everyone has felt welcome and encouraged to contribute.’
    • ‘His command of the English language was quite good too and he immediately made her feel welcome.’
    • ‘Mr Morse added that visitors were always welcome at the school.’
    • ‘My wife and I did not feel welcome outside the circle of our immediate colleagues.’
    • ‘Members and guests are welcome and should book early to ensure seating.’
    • ‘All are welcome to what promises to be a memorable and uplifting evening.’
    • ‘This tactic will let guests know that only the people to whom the invite is addressed are welcome.’
    • ‘New writers and visiting poets are always welcome and anyone is invited to come and share a poem during the open reading.’
    • ‘All Africans who want to do something for Africa are invited and welcome.’
    • ‘You know you are welcome here any time. Take care.’
    • ‘So your website must be ready to receive this welcome guest.’
    • ‘Ahmad has helped him out and is always a welcome guest.’
    • ‘Please note that all men and women are very welcome to this Service.’
    • ‘I've been in restaurants in Brussels where I felt like a welcome guest in somebody's home.’
    • ‘Cheers guys - and welcome to everyone from The Times.’
    gladly received, wanted, appreciated, popular, desirable, acceptable, accepted
    View synonyms
  • 2Very pleasing because much needed or desired.

    ‘after your walk, the tea room serves a welcome cuppa’
    ‘the news will be most welcome to those whose jobs will now be safeguarded’
    • ‘Please take a look and any additions are most welcome!’
    • ‘Volunteer helpers are also welcome and adults are allowed to join the mountain biking activities.’
    • ‘The cool air from the windows allowed a welcome breeze carrying the scent of pineapples and pomegranate.’
    • ‘Students in the focus group also commented on the cases being scheduled on Friday, and that this allowed a welcome change of pace.’
    • ‘Donations for teenage boys are particularly welcome.’
    pleasing, agreeable, encouraging, gratifying, heartening, promising, refreshing, favourable, propitious, cheering, much needed, pleasant, to one's liking, to one's taste
    View synonyms
  • 3predicative, with infinitive Allowed or invited to do a specified thing.

    ‘we arrange a framework of activities which you are welcome to join’
    • ‘I inquired on how to do that and he told me that I was welcome to watch and learn if I so desired.’
    • ‘You're welcome to do with it as you please, but quite frankly I'd rather not know.’
    • ‘All are welcome to play, but please leave your egos at the door.’
    • ‘All are welcome to attend and refreshments will be provided.’
    • ‘All are welcome to attend what promises to be a great afternoon of billiards.’
    • ‘The clubhouse and bar will be open on Sunday for refreshments, and anyone interested is welcome to just turn up on the day or call’
    • ‘People can express any opinion or concept they desire and anyone is welcome to take part.’
    • ‘Please feel welcome to come and join in, if you enjoy singing, or just enjoy the sound.’
    • ‘All mothers, grandparents and childminders are welcome to come and enjoy a chat and a cuppa.’
    • ‘You are welcome to stay with me if you please, for it's a pleasure to have you.’
    • ‘All are welcome to enjoy a coffee and chat Italian style.’
    • ‘All current members and interested community members are encouraged and most welcome to attend.’
    • ‘All existing members are asked to please attend on time and new members would be very welcome to come along.’
    • ‘Parents are welcome to help out and new members are encouraged to take part.’
    • ‘Anyone wanting to leave me ideas or suggestions is very welcome to, but please don't expect much in the way of credits.’
    • ‘The public is encouraged to attend the event, and men are welcome to cheer on the women and children as they march.’
    • ‘They would be welcome to participate in hands-on aid work if they desired.’
    • ‘What's more, during the day you're welcome to pop in just for a coffee.’
    • ‘If you are interested you are welcome to come along tonight’
    • ‘Parents and supporters are welcome to lend encouragement to our young players.’
    • ‘Light refreshments will be served and everyone is welcome to attend.’
    1. 3.1welcome to Used to indicate relief at relinquishing the control or possession of something to someone else.
      ‘the job is all yours and you're welcome to it!’
      • ‘Well Roger, if you want it back. then you are welcome to it.’

Phrases

  • make someone welcome

    • Receive and treat someone hospitably.

      ‘thank you for the way you made me welcome when I arrived’
      • ‘If emigrants from other countries choose to come to Ireland, we should make them welcome.’
      • ‘He believes congress should now jump at the chance to make them welcome and enrich the trade union movement.’
      • ‘The Bolton fans have made me welcome and are always chanting my name.’
      • ‘I went down and other players came in and made me welcome.’
      • ‘We are open for business Monday to Friday, 9.30 am to 5pm and if you would like to call in the team there will be more than delighted to make you welcome.’
      • ‘There's no doubt that there are some very professional clubs in this league and they are looking forward to playing us and making us welcome.’
      • ‘Jimmy's outgoing, jovial and sincere nature made him welcome in whatever company he found himself.’
      • ‘Mike, when called upon, made us welcome and led us the easy passage through.’
      • ‘I was a bit nervous at first but everyone has been very nice and made me welcome.’
      • ‘Businesses will leave and go to other cities or towns where they will be made welcome.’
      • ‘I started my career in the town back in the 1970s and from the outset the public have always made me welcome.’
      • ‘We always made him welcome and he always wanted to know when we were playing at home.’
      • ‘He made us welcome, gave his views on the North and took questions.’
      • ‘I think I played a good game and the supporters made me welcome.’
      • ‘It will be Geoff's first time blogging, so please make him welcome.’
      • ‘The staff were very pleasant and made us welcome.’
      • ‘She stayed in my house for a long time when she first arrived and I thought I had made her welcome, but she obviously did not think so.’
      • ‘If anyone wants to play a more regular part in the daily life of the centre and help muck-out or groom their adopted animal, they will be made welcome.’
  • outstay (or overstay) one's welcome

    • Stay as a visitor longer than one is wanted.

      ‘he makes you feel you've outstayed your welcome before you've even sat down’
      • ‘I have a great aunt named Sally, who always meant well, but was constantly messing things up and overstaying her welcome.’
      • ‘One of my friends has a habit of overstaying her welcome.’
      • ‘Finally the moment came when I knew I had to leave as I had already stayed for dinner and overstayed my welcome.’
      • ‘I'm beginning to feel they've now overstayed their welcome.’
      • ‘By overstaying his welcome, however, he may have deprived himself of the glorious exit that his achievements deserve.’
      • ‘Another way of dissuading the geese from overstaying their welcome in the park is limiting their food supply by keeping grass cut extremely short and imposing fines on people feeding them.’
  • you are welcome

    • Used as a polite response to thanks.

      ‘‘Thank you for your help.’ ‘You're welcome.’’

Origin

Old English wilcuma ‘a person whose coming is pleasing’, wilcumian (verb), from wil- ‘desire, pleasure’ + cuman ‘come’. The first element was later changed to wel- ‘well’, influenced by Old French bien venu or Old Norse velkominn.

Pronunciation

welcome

/ˈwɛlkəm/