Definition of weathervane in English:

weathervane

noun

  • A revolving pointer to show the direction of the wind, typically mounted on top of a building.

    vane
    • ‘Victorian architecture made much use of cast-iron ornament, and great variety is to be found all over the country, from manhole covers to weathervanes, fountains and bridges.’
    • ‘The 1869 New York City Register listed Fiske as a manufacturer of ornamental ironwork; fountains, vases, statuary, settees and chairs, and cast-iron and wire railings, iron stable fixtures, copper weathervanes.’
    • ‘The style has not totally disappeared - Russians and the native peoples of the Perm area are still known to decorate weathervanes, wooden gutters, and wooden salt cellars with carved images of horses and birds.’
    • ‘Becker notes that even once the war was underway, in the first days French morale was ‘extremely fragile… reacting a bit like a weathervane to the gusts of wind’.’
    • ‘The viewing platform resembles a raised circular sheepfold and is surmounted by a weathervane depicting a front-load tractor.’
    • ‘Mobile phone masts seem to be pretty much everywhere, concealed within road signs and lamp posts, inside churches, or disguised as weathervanes or trees, yet this isn't enough to get rid of ‘black spots’ across the capital.’
    • ‘In the garden there was a weathervane on top of a flagpole that indicated the wind direction to my father every morning when he woke up.’
    • ‘Custom weathervanes, fireplace grills, chimney caps and cupolas for gazebos and homes are commonly ordered from custom metal fabricators.’
    • ‘He said: ‘We wanted lights to highlight the weathervane on the pub but when I went to see what it would look like it is fair to say I wasn't very happy.’’
    • ‘A datestone featuring the fox, as seen on the village weathervane, is due to be laid in the building in a month's time.’
    • ‘Inside the museum, exhibits range from objects drawn from the traditional folk art - paintings, sculptures, weathervanes, flags, quilts - of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, to the works of contemporary self-taught artists.’
    • ‘It had a steepled roof with a weathervane at the top of the steeple and a brass bell tucked within the open wooden tower.’
    • ‘The little metal rooster weathervane on top of the roof would dream about being real, and would think about how lovely it would be to crow to the sun.’
    • ‘It describes the myriad of ways that cell phone masts have been hidden: ‘They are being disguised as chimneys, clocks, drainpipes, telegraph poles, and even weathervanes.’’
    • ‘There is a separate garage, which again also has an old world appearance, with lace curtains in the window, a weathervane and a lucky horseshoe over the door.’
    • ‘In Noah's Ark, she gives the adventure a festive spirit by hanging nautical-like flags on the boat, bringing aboard plants in clay pots, and crowning the ark's domed top with a weathervane.’
    • ‘It's not hard to spot the aquarium with its huge shark weathervane rising clearly above everything else on the island.’
    • ‘The King's interest in clocks and weathervanes, which combined high science with art, grew out of Bute's interest.’

Pronunciation:

weathervane

/ˈwɛðəveɪn/