Definition of waywardness in English:

waywardness

noun

  • See wayward

    • ‘It cannot compel you to remain in the congregation, forbid you from joining a competing sect, or punish you for your waywardness.’
    • ‘‘Parents say the child is stubborn, wilful and try to put down his waywardness to other things,’ she says.’
    • ‘And then like many before them they paid the penalty for their own waywardness.’
    • ‘By the 1980s, however, her waywardness, failing health and fading interest in contemporary music began to skew the quality of her output.’
    • ‘A lack of monitoring means misdemeanours go largely unreported, but already many British security firms, who traditionally enjoy the best reputation, have expressed worries about some of their colleagues' waywardness.’
    • ‘This is why, far from condemning individuals for their waywardness, hard drugs policy is increasingly therapeutic - treating users as patients who need protecting from their addiction, rather than individuals who should be punished.’
    • ‘We've gotten used to blaming parents for the waywardness of their children, when we don't blame the children themselves.’

Pronunciation

waywardness

/ˈweɪwədnəs/