Definition of wayfarer in English:

wayfarer

noun

literary
  • A person who travels on foot.

    • ‘The biblical hero of hospitality, Abraham, had a tent that was open to all four directions, welcoming wayfarers from all sides, of all sorts, at all times.’
    • ‘That is also when the omnipresent stray dogs are more interested in their siesta than in chasing hapless wayfarers.’
    • ‘To cross the narrow isthmus connecting the peninsula of the Peloponnesus to the rest of Greece, wayfarers had to shuffle in single file along a dangerous, cliffside trail, braving crumbling ledges and scree.’
    • ‘In July, local police had to save wayfarers four times.’
    • ‘After travel, the wayfarer's home is not the same anymore.’
    • ‘New wayfarers looking at these travel brochures are eco-tourists and spring-break students.’
    • ‘Another reference is also made to them being like lost wayfarers, tossed about by vicious storms; in an earlier reference these storms pushed the ships around in circles, hindering their progress.’
    • ‘Unlike the medieval or Renaissance wayfarers before them, however, these contemporary women are sitting in a car (a red Ford Explorer) in a snowstorm.’
    • ‘I am a wayfarer, and I am not ready to settle down in one place for good.’
    • ‘They made good progress and on the first night stopped at one of the wayfarers' inns that were stationed at convenient day intervals along the most used roads.’
    • ‘The people of the desert landscape are wayfarers and bandits.’
    • ‘You abuse your powers by stealing from travelers, and you make this forest even more perilous for harmless wayfarers!’
    • ‘It could be by helping someone needy, whether it is a relative, a neighbour, a wayfarer, an orphan, a lady waiting to get married, or a student.’
    • ‘The villa and its grounds had attracted no other wayfarers; the ruined stables would be comfortable enough.’
    • ‘From time immemorial our human race has been called a race of wanderers and wayfarers, a restless people forever setting forth in pursuit of a better life.’
    • ‘Through the closed windows came the occasional ‘peep’ of a fogbound wayfarer whistling for a hansom.’
    • ‘The ‘Hungry Rock’ road from Coolaney to Skreen is a short cut through the mountains and wayfarers should always remember to take enough provisions to ward off the supernatural demon which often caused severe hunger pangs.’
    • ‘Alas, the joint was shut, and there would be no refreshment for the parched 21st-century wayfarer.’
    • ‘There on the doorstop, drenched and dripping in the darkness, stood a miserably bedraggled Jewish wayfarer.’
    • ‘At the French villa that he purchased in 1926 and which served as his primary residence until his death in 1965, Maugham entertained scores of friends and wayfarers in Gatsbyesque style.’
    traveller, journeyer, nomad, migrant, gypsy, vagabond, vagrant, itinerant, drifter
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

wayfarer

/ˈweɪfɛːrə/