Definition of wattle and daub in English:

wattle and daub

noun

  • [mass noun] A material formerly or traditionally used in building walls, consisting of a network of interwoven sticks and twigs covered with mud or clay.

    • ‘Most have returned to their villages, but many have found that their wattle and daub huts have been damaged or washed away altogether.’
    • ‘There's a tableau, all wattle and daub, of a home in the 10th century after the Vikings had landed on the beach and built a fort called Skardaborg.’
    • ‘Don't expect five star luxury - you'll stay here in wattle and daub thatched huts and sleep on bamboo frames.’
    • ‘Medieval peasants lived in wattle and daub huts.’
    • ‘I could become a cartographer or a world expert on Thomas Edison or learn how to make wattle and daub huts.’
    • ‘Most of the homes of poor rural people are made of local materials, with floors of packed earth, walls of adobe or wattle and daub, and roofs of clay tiles or thatch.’
    • ‘No peasant wattle and daub homes exist anymore as they were so crudely made.’
    • ‘And sure enough, they turned a corner and the constable quickly ushered Malcolm towards a small but neat looking two-storey wattle and daub house.’
    • ‘She turned and disappeared into the gap between two wattle and daub buildings, their second stories overhanging the alley.’
    • ‘The two-story wattle and daub structure built in the Tudor style had sadly deteriorated.’
    • ‘Fragments of wattle and daub used in the house construction plus a trackway lined with tree trunks leading to the entrance have also been uncovered.’
    • ‘Church buildings were usually erected by members using wattle and daub construction, and financial contributions for maintenance were requested in every Sunday service.’
    • ‘Round about are borrow pits for taking clay to make wattle and daub walls.’
    • ‘Workers have uncovered a wattle and daub partition wall in the east wing and a centuries-old figurine.’
    • ‘In the dry, treeless areas, houses are constructed of rock or wattle and daub with mud or lime exteriors.’
    • ‘It was made of wattle and daub; honestly; there was a large framed piece of glass showing the construction of the walls just to the left of one of the fire doors in the main corridor.’
    • ‘And instead of being made from steel or aluminium it's wattle and daub.’
    • ‘Small houses made of wattle and daub and wood surrounded the outskirts of the village, while the few houses made of stone were in the market square.’
    • ‘According to a reporter, the villagers ignored government warnings and broke into the hostel building, where they feel somewhat safer than in their wattle and daub huts.’
    • ‘Inside, there is a 300-year-old wattle and daub fireplace, one of only three or four that still survive in Ireland.’