Definition of watt in English:

watt

(also W)

noun

  • The SI unit of power, equivalent to one joule per second, corresponding to the rate of consumption of energy in an electric circuit where the potential difference is one volt and the current one ampere.

    • ‘Changing to public ownership of the grid will not add a single watt of power.’
    • ‘Trial runs showed that the prototype device significantly cooled a heated surface on just 0.6 watts of power.’
    • ‘Capable of producing microwatts to watts of power, it is designed for spectroscopy applications.’
    • ‘With 460 watts of power its sure to provide even the hungriest of systems with stable voltages.’
    • ‘The smallest laser printers use at least 500 watts and the higher-end ones use at least a kilowatt.’
    • ‘One pump requires 28,000 watts of electricity and the main pool has a capacity of 10,000 cubic meters of water.’
    • ‘Now it doesn't take a genius to figure out if I put in 100 watts and get out 350 watts I am getting a lot of free energy.’
    • ‘When is it necessary to have a 350 watt power supply compared to just a 300 watt?’
    • ‘The unit has a power output of 150 watts and is small enough to fit in your plane's glove compartment when it's not in use.’
    • ‘Let's say that you have a power plant that can produce 1 million watts of power.’
    • ‘But it is estimated that the net heating is at least one watt, perhaps closer to two watts per square yard.’
    • ‘Just for a bit of perspective, a typical microwave easily consumes 1,200 watts.’
    • ‘The result is power densities are going from 40 watts per square fool to 68 watts per square foot and higher.’
    • ‘The original half watt of power will diminish to less than a billionth of a watt at the point of arrival.’
    • ‘Since 1987, the government has subsidized the use of electricity up to 220 watts for each unit in the building.’
    • ‘The chip will have a power consumption of under two watts.’
    • ‘The panels can generate 100 watts, enough to power a light bulb.’
    • ‘The power rating of the battery is 1,250 watts per kilogram, more than a kilowatt in each kilogram module in the system.’
    • ‘Instead, a few tens of watts are enough to power a chip with transistors numbering in the tens of millions.’
    • ‘It generated hundreds of watts of power in usable form, actually running, and we were astonished to see this.’

Origin

Late 19th century: named after James Watt(see Watt, James).

Pronunciation:

watt

/wɒt/