Definition of warder in English:

warder

noun

British
  • A guard in a prison.

    • ‘‘I am a prison warder in Glenochil but I feel more threatened walking around here at night,’ he says.’
    • ‘It has been revealed that white staff warders handcuffed a prisoner to his cell bars, pulled down his trousers and smeared black boot polish on his buttock, in a racially motivated attack.’
    • ‘The Daily Dispatch has learnt that 20 out 24 prison warders in King William's Town took ‘sick leave’.’
    • ‘A source told the Daily Dispatch that two prison warders heard the siren signalling an escape and drove into West Bank, where they saw two men running and tried to stop them.’
    • ‘Hofmeyr said the current investigation showed prison warders had received kickbacks from certain doctors for false claims against the medical aid fund.’
    • ‘However, although Roberts was accompanied by a prison warder to the tournament, he was found to have boxed without a licence.’
    • ‘A prison warder was called as a witness, to enable Barker to establish the harsh character of solitary confinement in the jail.’
    • ‘It irritated many, myself included, to hear that the prison warders of Wakefield Jail had been ordered to take off the England flag tie pins they were wearing to raise cash for a cancer charity.’
    • ‘After the war he became a prison warder and served in Mountjoy and Portlaoise Prisons.’
    • ‘Actors playing warders, who were walking with prisoners, were not allowed to walk past other warders walking with prisoners in the corridor.’
    • ‘The escapees, who were apparently being guarded by three prison warders while the others fought the fire, overpowered them and fled into the surrounding rural areas.’
    • ‘That means any time a prison warder wants to toss a few guys down to some sexually frustrated rapists as part of penal policy, or smash someone's teeth in, he has nothing to worry about.’
    • ‘This prisoner, a former policeman, was allegedly helping prison warders draw up false statements for submission to the commission, Barlow said.’
    • ‘A warder in a Paris prison lost her sense of smell, taste and the hearing in one ear after she was beaten by an inmate earlier this year.’
    • ‘It's not a name which trips easily off the tongue, unless, of course, you happen to be a warder in a Singapore prison.’
    • ‘The inquiry heard how warders handcuffed a prisoner, believed to be a foreign national, to his cell bars, pulled down his trousers and smeared black boot polish onto his buttocks.’
    • ‘The first time the army refused and sent him back to prison camp - this time as a warder in the military jail at Barlinnie.’
    • ‘He was one of 10 convicted prisoners who escaped from the prison on June 8 after holding up prison warders at gunpoint and locking them in a cell.’
    • ‘The commission is expected to dissect the video scene in which a prison warder is apparently seen delivering a juvenile convict to an adult's cell for sex and being paid R20 for his services.’
    • ‘Yet, unaccountably, once he was faced with prisons, prisoners and warders, Balfour stopped entertaining the people.’
    prison officer, guard, jailer, keeper, wardress
    sentry, captor
    screw
    turnkey
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a watchman or sentinel): from Anglo-Norman French wardere, from Old Northern French warder to guard. The current sense dates from the mid 19th century.

Pronunciation:

warder

/ˈwɔːdə/