Definition of wally in English:

wally

noun

British
informal
  • A silly or inept person:

    ‘I must have looked a total wally but I didn't care’
    • ‘It is also fair to say that every club in every sport probably has a wally or two in their midst.’
    • ‘I will retrieve my rusting Raleigh Roadster from under the junk in the garden shed, wire brush it down, oil the chain, don the Lycra, strap on the bedpan helmet and look a complete wally like the rest of them.’
    • ‘That decision that has affected Dell's bottom line, and so caused the Wall Street wallies to conclude that the bottom was dropping out of the PC market.’
    • ‘Its not all upper-class wallies who are part of this.’
    • ‘That way you can all fit in a taxi (unless you bring along some wally who doesn't drink as a driver).’
    • ‘And his star quality is using that to his advantage to exersise his psychology against wallies like Hoddle.’
    • ‘Hadn't the whole Eyghon disaster taught the little wally anything?’
    • ‘If ever we wanted a better example of what a bunch of wallies the members opposite are, David Brown gave it to us this afternoon.’
    • ‘If you're a bloke you do feel a bit of a wally driving the thing, even if you do manage to buy one in black or silver.’
    • ‘She wants none of him, and dreams that some day her prince will come, only to get a shock when Perseus appears and proves to be a wally.’
    • ‘I know it must be disturbing but I shouldn't worry about these wallies who send you abusive emails calling you un-Australian.’
    • ‘I just heard some wally on the radio saying that we should all go without meat for 24 hours and make the world a better place.’
    • ‘When I was wally gathering about in northern Michigan last month, I happened to come across an extremely quaint and downright adorable novelty shop that was selling various Indian style wares.’
    • ‘If you don't get that, you might be about to make yourself look a bit of a wally.’
    • ‘When the poor wallies on the Parole Board let such offenders out of prison, what is the consequence?’
    • ‘Last seen in his previous series making a wally of himself while getting drunk in a motion-sensor suit, he presents this series where psychology meets biology.’
    • ‘This are arrogant and highly naive comments from an ill-informed wally.’
    • ‘I may have looked a wally charging along wearing a cycling lid and rucksack, but it didn't slow me enough not to catch the villain within a couple of blocks.’
    • ‘He looked like a right wally and I suggest that baseball caps be banned from all chess tournaments as being inappropriate dress.’
    • ‘This bill says that Labour regards the Attorney-General as a wally.’
    idiot, ass, halfwit, nincompoop, blockhead, buffoon, dunce, dolt, ignoramus, cretin, imbecile, dullard, moron, simpleton, clod
    View synonyms

Origin

1960s: perhaps a shortened form of the given name Walter. There are many theories of the origin: one story tells of a Wally who became separated from companions at a 1960s pop festival; the name, announced many times over a loudspeaker, was taken up as a chant by the crowd.

Pronunciation:

wally

/ˈwɒli/