Main definitions of wake in English

: wake1wake2

wake1

verb

  • 1Emerge or cause to emerge from sleep; stop sleeping.

    no object ‘she woke up feeling better’
    with object ‘I woke him gently’
    • ‘Neighbours woken by her screams tried to save the girls, but were driven back by the intense heat.’
    • ‘I woke at dawn to the sun winking through the window of my room.’
    • ‘She wakes from a coma a few days later to learn the awful truth.’
    • ‘I got woken at 5am by the window rattling.’
    • ‘Wednesday morning, I woke up at 4am with a knot in my stomach.’
    • ‘Debbie was still asleep so I decided to try and go back to sleep until she woke up.’
    • ‘I woke up on Tuesday morning after a few hours fitful sleep and went back to the hospital.’
    • ‘The single mum-of-three never knows if she will wake up to yet more damage and destruction on her doorstep.’
    • ‘Jenny was afraid that Adam's raised voice would wake the children.’
    • ‘I wake up at 5am and lie there, pretending I am going to go back to sleep.’
    • ‘One of the most famous ghost sightings was by a six-year-old girl woken by scratching noises.’
    • ‘It's one of the two puzzling questions that I woke up to this morning.’
    • ‘When I woke up an hour later the rain had stopped, it was a glorious sunny day and mist was rising off the lake.’
    • ‘Many students attend classes in split shifts, which forces them to wake at dawn.’
    • ‘A little voice in her head woke her up this is not how you're going to start the New Year is it?’
    • ‘I woke up my two children who were sleeping at the time and went outside.’
    • ‘It is one night of tenderness with his dream girl Goldie that largely fuels the story, especially when he wakes the following morning to find her dead.’
    • ‘By Wednesday morning most of the region woke up to Christmas card scenes with several inches of snow.’
    • ‘He wakes his comrade, who stirs and stolidly puts on his boots, army shirt, cap, gun.’
    • ‘Georgia rolled over, waking slowly from a nice dream.’
    awake, awaken, waken, waken up, rouse, stir, come to, come around
    waken, rouse, arouse, bring to, bring around
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1wake up tono object Become alert to or aware of.
      ‘he needs to wake up to reality’
      • ‘So, instead of going around with our eyes shut hoping the problem will go away why don't we all wake up to what's going on around us.’
      • ‘It is time for British politics - the labour movement above all - to wake up to what is being done in our name.’
      • ‘The dirty deal was done before anyone at the Hungarian FA woke up to what was going on.’
      • ‘Dare we keep our fingers crossed that people are waking up to what a hollow man he is?’
      • ‘I also hope now more than I ever did during my life that people wake up to what a barbaric punishment this is.’
      • ‘People are waking up finally to the reality that the game has changed.’
      • ‘The Celtic Tiger boom has levelled off and we have to wake up to that reality, he added.’
      • ‘He said that by the time people woke up to what was being planned the time for consultation had passed.’
      • ‘And the thing is, just occasionally, you wake up to how bizarre your own life is.’
      • ‘South Africans are waking up to the reality of child rape and sexual abuse.’
      realize, become aware of, become conscious of, become mindful of, become heedful of, become alert to
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2with object Cause to stir or come to life.
      ‘his voice wakes desire in others’
      • ‘One by one as we scurried them towards the tow-line and began to lever them into harness, they raised their muzzles and let out a yowl to wake the dead.’
      • ‘These things woke memories of my past experiences.’
      • ‘Honestly, these things are probably loud enough to wake the dead.’
      • ‘My snores were, by all accounts, loud enough to wake the dead.’
      evoke, call up, conjure up, rouse, stir, revive, awaken, refresh, renew, resuscitate, revivify, rekindle, reignite, rejuvenate, stimulate
      View synonyms
  • 2Irish North American dialect with object Hold a vigil beside (someone who has died)

    ‘we waked Jim last night’

noun

  • 1A watch or vigil held beside the body of someone who has died, sometimes accompanied by ritual observances.

    ‘he was attending a friend's wake’
    • ‘But the undertaker, by some misunderstanding, took the man's remains to the house of the woman's friends, where a wake was held.’
    • ‘This we use in times of sadness and happiness, for wakes and weddings.’
    • ‘A death in the Creole community is observed with an evening wake in the family's home.’
    • ‘You play cards or mahjong and drink beer at funeral wakes.’
    • ‘Bodies in the United States are usually kept in the funeral homes till the wake is done.’
    • ‘Anger mounted throughout the next day, as residents, family friends and young people placed wreaths and cards on the tree and conducted a midday wake and vigil at the site.’
    • ‘After announcement of a death, a wake is held for friends and family.’
    • ‘Funerals and all-night wakes, called ‘sit-ups,’ are important social occasions.’
    • ‘When my mother died, the young pastor at St. Paul's wouldn't lead a rosary at the wake.’
    • ‘A testament to the high respect in which he was held was seen in the large attendance at his wake, removal and burial.’
    • ‘Still, one could say that all wakes are formulaic, rituals being a most popular and apparently effective means to deal with death.’
    • ‘For instance, Catholics hold funeral wakes on the first and eighth nights after a person's death.’
    • ‘After the wake, a morning funeral was held, complete with a mass in church, and then the body was taken to the cemetery for burial.’
    • ‘He could cry at Christenings, weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, wakes.’
    • ‘I have to go to a wake tonight and a funeral tomorrow.’
    • ‘Indeed, even the pitch invasion at the final whistle seemed more like a wake than a party and soon evaporated into memory.’
    • ‘The most important Catholic rituals are baptism and the wake, followed by a funeral mass.’
    • ‘First, a wake was held at a funeral home in Sherman Oaks, with his body on display in an open casket.’
    • ‘These require the isolation of the corpse, prohibit the holding of wakes over the body, and permit doctors to prevent the removal of a body from hospital.’
    • ‘Any breach of the rule was to result in a withdrawal by the clergy of their services at the wake and funeral.’
    1. 1.1 (especially in Ireland) a party held after a funeral.
      • ‘Hospitality was associated with both of these elements as they unfolded in the course of the wake in Ireland.’
      • ‘This liberal provision of hospitality and other outlays made the wake and funeral a costly business, according to the Revd Neligan.’
      • ‘This village had experienced a particularly bloody massacre when Renamo rebels killed 42 people in cold blood at a funeral wake.’
      • ‘Shocked regulars are holding a wake for him at the pub after his funeral service at Southend Crematorium next Tuesday.’
      • ‘Lively wakes are held after Polish funerals, with toasts and tributes to the deceased.’
      • ‘His funeral took place yesterday, with a wake in the pub.’
      • ‘The woman is over here from Ireland for the wake, she explains, and she just had to come over and talk.’
      • ‘It is believed the bar had hosted a funeral wake on Friday, but it was not yet known if the victim was connected to the event.’
      • ‘The head teacher's farewell after 23 years in post, the golf club dinner, the police ball, wakes and weddings - they could only take place in the Royal, the hub of the town.’
      • ‘We celebrate the final episode of a beloved sitcom as if it were a wake for an old friend.’
      • ‘The custom of providing hospitality at wakes or funerals is well documented for the seventeenth century.’
      • ‘The body is left in the church overnight and the traditional wake held after the vigil in the church hall or an adjoining room.’
      • ‘Two Irish ladies were at the wake for their dear friend.’
      • ‘After the funeral comes the wake, the time for contemplation as the past releases its grip.’
      • ‘Now, after 343 of them perished in the terrorist attacks, there are just too many funerals, wakes and memorial services to get round them all.’
      • ‘Both wakes and funerals for Peter and Martin were attended by some of the largest crowds ever seen at funeral services in the Bronx and Yonkers.’
      • ‘It's not unlike the Irish wake or the Jewish shiva - designed not merely to comfort the bereaved but to celebrate the triumph of life.’
      • ‘After his funeral on Wednesday, family and friends attended his wake at the Moorings function room, behind the Anchor pub.’
      • ‘I've turned up too late for the funeral, but at least I can enjoy the wake.’
      • ‘They offered to help and they organised the wake after the funeral.’
      vigil, death-watch, watch
      View synonyms
  • 2wakestreated as singular An annual festival and holiday held in some parts of northern England, originally one held in a rural parish on the feast day of the patron saint of the church.

    ‘his workers absented themselves for the local wakes’
    as modifier ‘wakes weeks’
    • ‘For that to work in Lancashire, all schools would need to take the same holidays - meaning an end to the wakes weeks holidays in Burnley and Pendle.’
    • ‘Many parents said they would still have to take their children on holiday in wakes weeks.’
    • ‘The Glamorgan gentry patronized the boisterous village wakes, and even established new ones in communities which lacked them.’
    • ‘Statutory Bank Holidays belong to the same tradition as the old northern wakes weeks.’

Phrases

  • wake up and smell the coffee

    • informal usually in imperativeBecome aware of the realities of a situation, however unpleasant.

      ‘keep an eye on your friends, who may be using you—wake up and smell the coffee!’
      • ‘With the latest outbreak of gun-related violence in Washington, maybe the mass of U.S. citizens will finally wake up and smell the coffee.’
      • ‘And if you think that's just because we all wanted to see a display of scintillating football from the England XI, wake up and smell the coffee.’
      • ‘Some people may say 140 cases is 140 too many… well wake up and smell the coffee buddy boy… we do live in a real world after all!’
      • ‘If your idea of accountancy is grey-suited men hunched over page of numbers, you'd better wake up and smell the coffee.’
      • ‘Many analysts believe investors are beginning to wake up and smell the coffee - revenues, cash flow and earnings count for something.’
      • ‘Please wake up and smell the coffee where technical education is concerned before it's too late.’
      • ‘The Brazilian superstar has found playing time hard to come by at the San Siro, but perhaps his latest stunt will get coach Carlo Ancelotti to wake up and smell the coffee.’
      • ‘At some point our Asian creditors will wake up and smell the coffee.’
      • ‘I tell these young motorcyclists that if they don't think what they're doing is inherently dangerous then they need to wake up and smell the coffee.’
      • ‘When are the Republicans going to wake up and smell the coffee?’

Origin

Old English (recorded only in the past tense wōc), also partly from the weak verb wacian ‘remain awake, hold a vigil’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch waken and German wachen; compare with watch.

Pronunciation

wake

/weɪk/

Main definitions of wake in English

: wake1wake2

wake2

noun

  • A trail of disturbed water or air left by the passage of a ship or aircraft.

    • ‘The reason given for this crash was that the aircraft flew into the wake of another aircraft, and the pilot lost control of it.’
    • ‘What effect does this asymmetrical function of the dorsal and ventral tail lobes have on patterns of water flow in the wake?’
    • ‘It notes that every aircraft generates a wake while in flight.’
    • ‘When we motor into the channel, however, I can't help noticing that the mooring buoy is trailing a foaming wake as the outgoing tide thunders past the boat.’
    • ‘All aircraft produce wake turbulence - spirals of air that trail from the wingtips that can be a particular hazard when smaller aircraft follow a larger plane.’
    • ‘She watches her father's departure by ship from a rowboat that is nearly swamped in the ship's wake.’
    • ‘Wake turbulence happens when we pass through the wake of another aircraft, similar to when a boat passes through the wake of another vessel.’
    • ‘Next morning the sea is oily smooth, broken only by the wake of passing ships.’
    • ‘Pilots can avoid wake turbulence by allowing greater distance behind the heavy aircraft and their own, or by delaying takeoff for a few minutes.’
    • ‘We picked up the first Mk-25 at a quarter-mile and then got a visual on the ship's wake.’
    • ‘The speedboat kicked up a huge wave of water in its wake.’
    • ‘As we passed overhead, the glare of the moonlight on the water receded, and with our goggles, we could see a wake behind the ship.’
    • ‘Such shockwaves are a bit like the wake of a ship travelling across the ocean.’
    • ‘The pilot gets into a small bit of leftover wake turbulence, the rental aircraft wobbles just before touchdown and a wingtip catches the runway.’
    • ‘Franklin had noticed that the wake of one ship he saw was particularly smooth, and was told that the cooks had probably just discharged greasy water through the scuppers.’
    • ‘Torpedoes powered by compressed air left a telltale wake in the water and gave a warning to a target.’
    • ‘If you begin to see mud or floating grass blades in your wake, slow down and find deeper water.’
    • ‘Black water was seen in the ship's wake after the bombs exploded, proof the submarine was doomed.’
    • ‘Whether it's cruising through a wake or throwing an anchor, according to him I do it all wrong.’
    • ‘Even the ground over which a tank has driven shows where the track pressure has warmed it, like the wake of a ship.’
    backwash, wash, slipstream, turbulence
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • in the wake of

    • Following (someone or something), especially as a consequence.

      ‘the committee was set up in the wake of the inquiry’
      • ‘After the pension scheme was revalued in the wake of the dotcom bubble, that surplus turned to a deficit.’
      • ‘Scottish education always trailed in the wake of conservative Westminster measures.’
      • ‘Within a couple of hours, however, they had changed their tune in the wake of negative feedback.’
      • ‘Higher interest rates may be on the horizon, but are not expected to arrive speedily in the wake of the Budget.’
      • ‘The reshuffle of top management came in the wake of its merger and as the group posted a solid set of first half results.’
      • ‘The news comes in the wake of two fatal road accidents in the Swindon area.’
      • ‘Media hysteria has followed in the wake of all new developments in youth culture.’
      • ‘She gave up acting for a year at the very point when she was on the brink of bigger things, in the wake of Almost Famous.’
      • ‘Listening to these three albums in the wake of Smith's suicide casts a certain pall on their contents.’
      • ‘It suffered huge losses in the wake of September 11 and its shares have nosedived.’
      • ‘But now the idea is being taken seriously in the wake of yet more deaths on our rail network.’
      • ‘The series comes in the wake of Stephen Poliakoff's drama Friends And Crocodiles.’
      • ‘The film could also lift a tourist industry struggling in the wake of recent international events.’
      • ‘Conditions on the moors are being monitored throughout the area in the wake of a number of moorland blazes.’
      • ‘Goodwin's stand-down came in the wake of an even more ferocious academic scandal.’
      • ‘The incident comes in the wake of widespread calls to restrict the sale of fireworks to members of the public.’
      • ‘The news comes in the wake of the club announcing its first new signing, goalkeeper Craig Dootson.’
      • ‘The idea was born from the damage done to the local tourist industry in the wake of the foot and mouth disease outbreak.’
      • ‘The review comes in the wake of two profit warnings from the group so far this year.’
      • ‘They are obviously capitalising on the generosity of the public in the wake of the tsunami disaster.’
      aftermath
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 15th century (denoting a track made by a person or thing): probably via Middle Low German from Old Norse vǫk, vaka ‘hole or opening in ice’.

Pronunciation

wake

/weɪk/