Main definitions of waffle in English

: waffle1waffle2

waffle1

verb

[no object]informal
  • 1British Speak or write at length in a vague or trivial manner.

    ‘he waffled on about his problems’
    • ‘Of course it's all wrapped in a chocolate coating of beautifully crafted songs and a crisp musicianship, but the 12 tracks on Always Got Tonight do waffle on a bit.’
    • ‘But instead of producing the figures to explain why it wouldn't, Mr. Darrell waffled incomprehensibly about students moving schools.’
    • ‘Do you realise you waffled on about nothing and by the time I had got to the end of the letter I had forgotten what the whole situation was about?’
    • ‘They've waffled on at length about it, but as is usual the action comes a generation later.’
    • ‘I've a nagging feeling that I have probably waffled on about this album before, but it still makes me smile.’
    • ‘In other words, he did waffle on with his answer.’
    • ‘Or maybe that sounds incredibly pretentious and I just waffle.’
    • ‘Minutes passed by, and the President waffled on, punctuated only by a cough or the quiet dropping of screws.’
    • ‘Despite his tendency to waffle on aimlessly, he does on occasion write things that are worth reading…’
    • ‘Easily outraged punters with nothing better to do have waffled on about him on talk-back programmes and blogs and message boards.’
    • ‘Approaching the top of my walk I was waffling into my tape recorder about mushrooms.’
    • ‘I either bluster through and waffle away, mumbling on further and further away from the point in hand, or I go to the other extreme and clam up completely.’
    • ‘It seems they just waffle on in the local press about the litter in the local park.’
    • ‘Okay, so I've waffled on enough with my paranoid conspiracy theories.’
    • ‘Though he waffled on about guitars and music, he gave no inkling on the extent of his passion for his other hobby - motorsport.’
    • ‘Anyone willing to pay money to hear us all waffle on for sixty minutes of unbridled nonsense?’
    • ‘Serena, who has hardly said more than two words to me in the past, came over and started waffling on about her trip to France.’
    • ‘Rather than waffle or quote at length from pieces to which I have little to add, I will simply link to few pieces well worth a look.’
    • ‘The stars - normally so quick to leap in front of the nearest press crew and start waffling about how ‘incredible’ everyone was - have also been instructed to keep their self-promoting lips tightly sealed.’
    • ‘And, having reached a nice rounded and witty conclusion, I'm going to spoil it by waffling on and qualifying what I've said.’
    prattle, chatter, babble, ramble, jabber, gibber, gabble, gab, burble, flannel, run on, mutter, mumble, prate, drivel, bleat, cackle
    View synonyms
  • 2North American Fail to make up one's mind.

    ‘Joseph had been waffling over where to go’
    • ‘I'm waffling here, unwilling to say we were snobby or we were justified in our behavior, but I can see it from both sides.’
    • ‘Yes, the Governor is steadfastly pro-choice. And he just signed an anti-global warming bill that he had been waffling on.’
    • ‘The spokeswoman waffled for weeks and then finally declined, after explaining that she found some articles on the Reason Web site ‘anti-feminist.’’
    • ‘So he waffled even on the issue of a camera in the courtroom.’
    • ‘He has waffled on doing away with the Patriot Act, courted the gun lobby and promised vigorous dialogue with the right.’
    • ‘Earlier today I'd been waffling about whether or not I'd take the night off and go hear a few bands.’
    • ‘They keep her from being lonely, take her on trips, and urge her to make medical appointments when she's waffling about whether to see a doctor and really should do so.’
    • ‘He said broadcasters had only themselves to blame for the rough transition to digital because they waffled on the technology and hadn't invested enough in digital-format programming to lure audiences.’
    • ‘Because so many of our allies are waffling at this point.’
    • ‘But waffling on the central issue of Vietnam is far more difficult.’
    • ‘He seems to have waffled on the matter, though, and some on the right will probably be more reluctant to withdraw now that blood has been spilled.’
    • ‘Today the Senate Democratic leader told me the White House seems to be waffling when it comes to the North Korea standoff.’
    • ‘For months I had been waffling: should I stay or go?’
    • ‘Opponents criticize him for waffling on the issues and for seeming aloof.’
    • ‘I was eating dinner with Miss K, and waffling about the relationship, and I opened the cookie and read this fortune: ‘Make up your mind and do what you want to do.’’
    • ‘This month, for example, the government waffled on a commitment to buy 73 of Airbus Industrie's new A400 military transports for $9.7 billion.’
    • ‘The second thing is that you have waffled on whether you would hire gay people in your administration.’
    • ‘I'm sure the residents are confused because of government waffling.’
    • ‘In the latter days of the campaign, Clay waffled on annexing Texas, particularly in his ‘Alabama letters.’’

noun

informal
  • 1British mass noun Lengthy but vague or trivial talk or writing.

    ‘we've edited out some of the waffle’
    • ‘At the time, US government spokespeople dismissed it as so much waffle, especially railing against the intimations that ‘death squads’ might be involved.’
    • ‘I shudder to think how much it costs to employ one or more staff to put together this load of waffle, to print off thousands of copies and to send them via the Royal Mail to every household.’
    • ‘All we got from him during Tuesday's ‘debate’ at the party conference was a lot of waffle about the new fees being used to give bursaries to poorer students.’
    • ‘He has the rare ability to shun irrelevant waffle, to identify the important problems and produce important solutions.’
    • ‘Every week councillors nationwide receive pages of waffle from this Government advising us of our duty to take action to reduce carbon emissions.’
    • ‘There has been talk of interest from Manchester United, but Moyes dismissed it as waffle.’
    • ‘I don't think my blogging muse has quite returned yet, so standby for some more inane waffle.’
    • ‘Saying ‘there are no easy answers’ is platitudinous waffle.’
    • ‘What they appear to be getting from this latest cultural think-tank is waffle - and misleading waffle at that.’
    • ‘Where is the morality in a woman being given 80 grand a year to spout waffle on energy fields and crystals and fitness?’
    • ‘Was all this vague new age waffle disguised as insight still managing to fool people?’
    • ‘I tuned in mostly out of a sense of duty, expecting to have to sit through a turgid display of tired political rhetoric and waffle.’
    • ‘The promise to launch the biggest-ever public consultation smacks of meaningless waffle.’
    • ‘However last month I got perilously close to the maximum free limit, with 97KB of text and waffle on this site in January.’
    • ‘No matter, both locations are stunningly beautiful, and the shots of wide seas, mountains and endless skies makes up for an awful load of waffle.’
    • ‘Lots of waffle about ‘problem-solving committees’, lots of grumbling about the police not doing very much.’
    • ‘You have to get through an awful lot of terrible dialogue and acting, however, plus a lot of fantastically insincere waffle about the environment, to get to those spectacular scenes.’
    • ‘This is probably undeserving of the music category, being as it is one part music to five parts self-indulgent waffle.’
    • ‘When hunting was banned, there was much insincere, scientifically discredited waffle about cruelty to animals.’
    • ‘There was no way that I was going to write out some 347 words of waffle in block capitals, so I decided to print out what I'd written and stick it onto the form instead.’
    prattle, jabbering, verbiage, drivel, meaningless talk, nonsense, twaddle, gibberish, stuff and nonsense, bunkum, mumbo jumbo, padding, flannel, verbosity, prolixity
    View synonyms
  • 2US in singular A failure to make up one's mind.

    ‘his waffle on abortion’
    • ‘It has been widely suggested that the Vatican meetings this week produced another waffle.’

Origin

Late 17th century (originally in the sense ‘yap, yelp’): frequentative of dialect waff ‘yelp’, of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

waffle

/ˈwɒf(ə)l/

Main definitions of waffle in English

: waffle1waffle2

waffle2

noun

  • A small crisp batter cake, baked in a waffle iron and eaten hot with butter or syrup.

    • ‘Upon entering she smelled the sweet aroma of blueberry waffles in the air.’
    • ‘I go to stock up on frozen pizzas, waffles, popcorn, peanut butter and chocolate cookies.’
    • ‘That's everything from eggs and cheese to potato waffles and pancakes.’
    • ‘They sat down at a long table with plates of waffles, syrup, butter, whipped cream, and strawberries piled on top of it.’
    • ‘Maple syrup is no longer relegated to its standard role of sweetening pancakes and waffles; this versatile ingredient adds flavor to both sweet and savory dishes alike.’
    • ‘Satine was sitting at the kitchen table, pouring maple syrup on her waffles.’
    • ‘Angel had never seen so much food: pancakes and eggs, waffles and syrup, and so much more.’
    • ‘Paying no mind to his father, Chris stuck a frozen waffle into the toaster and pulled the rubber band off of the morning newspaper.’
    • ‘Then a stack of hot waffles tumbling with maple syrup, cream and fresh fruits.’
    • ‘Imagine waking up and being offered homemade waffles, light and crispy, with butter and syrup.’
    • ‘On an average weekend morning when the whole family is at home, they'll go through a good jar of the stuff on toast, waffles, pancakes, or eager fingers.’
    • ‘We gorged ourselves on boardwalk treats: caramel apples, cotton candy, salt water taffy, hot waffles and ice cream.’
    • ‘At the cabin, breakfast takes center stage - always bacon or sausage, waffles or pancakes, and eggs.’
    • ‘I went to the freezer and discovered that there were more frozen waffles than I'd thought.’
    • ‘Saturday and Sunday is when the fancy breakfasts come out; pancakes and waffles swimming in maple syrup, and bacon and eggs.’
    • ‘Well, my plans to be good today fell to pieces when Emilie brought caramel waffles back from Amsterdam.’
    • ‘Some people cook a big breakfast - pancakes, waffles, eggs and toast - even on weekdays.’
    • ‘In France, batter is transformed into crisp beignets and croquettes, into traditional waffles peculiar to each region, and into smooth, light crêpes.’
    • ‘If you want intense blueberry syrup, make this one to serve over pancakes, waffles or ice cream.’
    • ‘First, another great way to spruce up cake, ice cream, even pancakes and waffles, is a simple strawberry sauce.’

adjective

  • Denoting a style of fine honeycomb weaving or a fabric woven to give a honeycomb effect.

    • ‘And after a bath, they like to wrap up in a waffle weave bathrobe by Queechee Bo.’
    • ‘If a guy had a pair of matching white waffle bathrobes, then I would assume other women would have at some stage worn the lady-sized robe.’
    • ‘The living areas are tastefully furnished, with all the accessories you'd expect of a spa - big fluffy white towels, cool waffle robes and crisp cotton linen.’
    • ‘This shirt, which comes in six solid colors, is woven in a waffle pattern and features a treatment that makes the silk truly washable.’
    • ‘In addition to its comfort and coolness, Cross Creek's Cool Knit fabric is really a variation of a pique stitch that creates an interesting waffle texture.’
    • ‘They could be edited together into one, better movie, where we see more of people in flashy leather duds and sunglasses instead of stained waffle undershirts.’
    • ‘The waffle material is really lightweight, but does an excellent job of keeping you warm!’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from Dutch wafel; compare with wafer and goffer.

Pronunciation

waffle

/ˈwɒf(ə)l/