Definition of vulgarity in English:

vulgarity

noun

mass noun
  • 1The state or quality of being vulgar.

    ‘he was seen as the embodiment of the vulgarity of the 1980s’
    • ‘A term applied to art or artefacts characterized by vulgarity, sentimentality, and pretentious bad taste.’
    • ‘The BCI's lexicon of vulgarity emerges from a survey of viewer and listener attitudes, published as part of the commission's efforts to develop a taste and decency code for Ireland's independent broadcasters.’
    • ‘The public will goggle at the kitsch vulgarity of diamond-encrusted eggs and crystal flowers.’
    • ‘The sheer vulgarity of the presidential jet and the extravagance it represents is disconcerting.’
    • ‘Fortunately, the potential for vulgarity is dissipated by Halo's reputation for quality.’
    • ‘Rather, his gaze falls on a ‘neutral’ zone which avoids ‘tainting’ his gaze with vulgarity or committing him to a confirmed passion.’
    • ‘The same set of circumstances which with one hand had popularised astrology, worked with the other to strip it of academic respect and taint it with vulgarity and a lack of integrity.’
    • ‘Is anyone really interested in the vanity and vulgarity of a couple who make their living by playing up to the media?’
    • ‘In an age of crassness, vulgarity and self-indulgence, she has continued to be an icon of what we once were and of what we might yet become again.’
    • ‘He's honest about his own vulgarity as much as he is about his vulnerability.’
    • ‘Why no mention of Monty Modlin, whose honest vulgarity marked a sea-change in British broadcasting?’
    • ‘After a while, though, I found the spirit of vulgarity and tackiness fascinating - you have to admire the Japanese ability to blend modernity and materialism with age-old traditions.’
    • ‘Thus it is wrong to blame ‘nationalism’ for the violence and vulgarity of mass sporting events.’
    • ‘And god knows I prefer honest vulgarity to polite denial of uncomfortable truths.’
    • ‘Just as the world is transforming itself into a wonderland of cascading tinsel, cherubs and illuminated trees, some humanist somewhere is sure to have begun ranting about the pointless vulgarity of it all.’
    • ‘Clearly, nothing distresses the sensitive Mr Jenkins more than vulgarity.’
    • ‘Hollywood's annual orgy of glamour, glitter and vulgarity - the Oscars - is almost upon us again.’
    • ‘The old challenge (rarely achieved) is to get the playing to the point where it's both charged and accurate, without reaching out in desperation for the easy solutions of vulgarity and random emotional brutality.’
    • ‘You can expect the same vulgarity and crassness you have come to love from these fine upstanding pillars of society.’
    • ‘Broadcaster John Humphrys recently attacked shows like Big Brother for their ‘mind-numbing, witless vulgarity.’’
    tastelessness, bad taste, grossness, crassness, lack of refinement, tawdriness, flamboyance, flamboyancy, ostentation, excess, gaudiness, garishness, showiness, flashiness, brassiness, tinsel, kitsch, loudness, harshness
    impoliteness, ill manners, bad manners, impropriety, grossness, indecorousness, uncouthness, crudeness, coarseness, roughness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1count noun A vulgar remark or act.
      ‘his letters were full of vulgarities’
      • ‘Now the vogue is for ceding powers to the autocracy of Brussels, which is immune from the vulgarities of electoral leverage.’
      • ‘One would expect the relentless cacophony of vulgarities and the unrelenting evocation of disturbing mental images first to shock, then to have a numbing effect on the audience.’
      • ‘You probably haven't noticed, but my surname bears a passing resemblance to a certain vulgarity.’
      • ‘Anywhere and any time a vulgarity or offensive expression is used in lieu of expressing an idea, there is usually a better way to make the point using non-offensive words.’
      • ‘The DSUE was widely regarded as filling a lexicographical gap, because it treated four-letter words and sexual and scatological vulgarities that had previously been omitted by the OED and the general run of ‘family’ dictionaries.’
      • ‘When Qiyong confessed it was his game character, Tan hurled vulgarities at him.’
      • ‘In any case, Jobs declined to answer the question as Apple is in the ‘quiet period’ before it announces its results when it is not allowed to talk about vulgarities like sales.’
      • ‘That's right, I shall stop using vulgarities as well.’
      • ‘They'll embellish and add things until the joke is so stuffed full of extreme vulgarities that everyone is shocked.’
      • ‘Instantly, a stream of vulgarities is spewed at her.’
      • ‘Sidewalks were spray-painted with assorted vulgarities, and a ‘Do Not Enter’ sign was erected on the school lawn.’
      • ‘Some have criticized Kechiche for this, claiming that the endless barrage of threats and vulgarities is too highly exaggerated.’
      • ‘Yesterday the five-member commission unanimously declared that, fleeting or not, and in whatever context, the word was a vulgarity and as a result a violation.’
      • ‘Despite occasional rough patches where he resorts to four-letter vulgarities, he comes up with countless utterances so pungent you want to recite them to everyone within earshot.’
      • ‘It has a huge number of synonyms, ranging from coy euphemisms to joking proxies, to coarse vulgarities.’
      • ‘But here the joke is taken even further in that the rowdy revelations and carnival vulgarities of a typical Jerry Springer talk show are set by Richard Thomas to chorales and anthems evoking Bach and Handel.’
      • ‘That's normal when you're famous and your albums are full of self-promotional rhymes, arrogance and vulgarities.’
      • ‘Along with teaching us how to cook a mean spaghetti sauce, Grandma taught us how to let out a stream of vulgarities in a foreign language.’
      • ‘My mind kept flashing certain rude vulgarities I'd have loved to shout in his face, so I couldn't sleep again.’
      • ‘He was suspended for one game by the NBA on Tuesday for yelling a sexual vulgarity at a female fan during a game.’
      rudeness, crudity, indecency, indelicacy, offensiveness, suggestiveness, bawdiness, ribaldry, obscenity, lewdness, salaciousness, licentiousness, depravity, sordidness, smuttiness, dirtiness, filthiness, smut, dirt, filth, pornography
      View synonyms

Pronunciation

vulgarity

/vʌlˈɡarɪti/