Definition of voyeur in English:

voyeur

Pronunciation /vwʌɪˈjəː//vɔɪˈjəː/

noun

  • 1A person who gains sexual pleasure from watching others when they are naked or engaged in sexual activity.

    ‘he stood transfixed, a voyeur feasting on the swell of her buttocks’
    • ‘In slightly different circumstances, the scene would be enough to sweep even the most demanding of voyeurs from impotence to premature ejaculation in a few hazy moments.’
    • ‘Now, if you've suddenly turned into a voyeur, well, your sex life is your own business, not mine, and I don't have any right to demand an explanation of what turns you on these days.’
    • ‘Jefferson is an obsessive voyeur, through a carefully concealed camera he watches the women at home, cooking, bathing, entertaining guests and making love.’
    • ‘Curiosity is their driving instinct, so these flitting voyeurs get their highs from watching rather than doing.’
    • ‘Porn voyeurs are in for a treat next month, with the promise of a record-breaking online orgy.’
    • ‘The advance of new technology, and in particular the use of cellphone cameras, has enhanced the ability of voyeurs to engage in such recordings.’
    • ‘Plus, you can sit in the back and kiss your boyfriend all you want without having to worry about Peeping Toms or voyeurs.’
    • ‘Did they feel he was a voyeur, peeking in windows, watching their naked bodies, making them feel ashamed?’
    • ‘‘Dave has told me he often feels like a voyeur watching the intimate dance unfold or a puppet master manipulating us with his guitar strings,’ says Webb.’
    • ‘Pornographers and voyeurs communicate with each other and learn how to articulate fluctuating sexual scenarios and pornographic roles.’
    • ‘Brendan Fletcher plays a teen voyeur who likes to spy on gay men having sex in a park.’
    • ‘And for the voyeurs, Tessa's steamy shower scene is shocking for TV fare.’
    • ‘Such explicitness forces us into the role of voyeurs, and makes engagement with the paintings so fraught we loose sight of their symbolic dimension.’
    • ‘After the car keys parties of the 1970s, hedonists are nowadays more likely to opt for pursuits such as ‘dogging’ - having sex in car parks while voyeurs watch.’
    • ‘The emphasis on celluloid as the medium for voyeurs, pornographers and for exploitation rings true with other more high minded explorations of the moving image.’
    • ‘From being the object of voyeurism Magda becomes the voyeur, and from being the loved one turns into the lover.’
    • ‘Like peep-show voyeurs, they want to read erotic materials and repudiate any interest in them at the same time.’
    • ‘The king is the cause of his own jealousy because he is a voyeur, at once aroused and made jealous by watching the object of his desire perform an act of seduction at his bidding.’
    • ‘Is photography what happens when a voyeur meets a narcissist?’
    • ‘During this sequence, Glen, and Wood's alter ego, Lugosi, become male voyeurs who are both disgusted, yet strangely excited, by the activities of the women.’
    1. 1.1 A person who enjoys seeing the pain or distress of others.
      ‘a voyeur of death’
      ‘murder trials make us voyeurs’
      • ‘Through these responses, viewers are checking their own desire to participate as voyeurs and to be entertained by the house guests' interpersonal dramas.’
      • ‘Though I am not a voyeur, I do take some enjoyment from watching these idling drivers punch their car radios, and, if their windows are down, listening to the cacophony of sounds that emit from their sound systems.’
      • ‘He believes Americans watch not as voyeurs but as crusaders: We want to see justice done and evildoers vanquished.’
      • ‘Taken out of the theatre, the 13 spectators become voyeurs of a slightly dated reality show.’
      • ‘I feel like a reluctant voyeur, watching a flower die in heart wrenching, time lapse photography.’
      • ‘This is not a film where we find ourselves empathizing with the heroine; instead, we are dispassionate voyeurs, observing her actions and unraveling clues about who she was, is, and will be.’
      • ‘Anna Nolan, 29, is one of ten strangers who has been locked in a house complete with 25 cameras and dozens of microphones so that Net voyeurs can satisfy their craving for warts-and-all people gazing.’
      • ‘The Guardian accused its competitors of pandering to a voyeur instinct by prying into Blunkett's life.’
      • ‘We watch like greedy voyeurs as he walks away from the world and its troubles.’
      • ‘Obviously many men did not survive the crashes I witnessed, and I felt a bit like a voyeur watching it on screen.’
      • ‘The domestication of the nation's tastes has become so banal that we are content to watch, as voyeurs, a middle-aged woman on Changing Rooms cry for joy at her new dining room.’
      • ‘On first viewing I remember feeling like a voyeur who should not be watching the anguish of a family under such strain and shock, all the while trying to maintain its coherence and dignity.’
      • ‘We have become voyeurs getting our kicks out of other people's fun and misfortunes.’
      • ‘The fact that the economy is stuck in neutral and that good jobs are hard to find makes the overcompensated especially tempting targets for TV voyeurs.’
      • ‘This device also draws in listeners in that it asks us to be more than voyeurs; it asks us to be activists who save others from lynching.’
      • ‘But the truth can be told with powerful understatement as well, in words and visual images that create empathy without turning the American people into paranoid voyeurs.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from French, from voir ‘see’.

Pronunciation

voyeur

/vwʌɪˈjəː//vɔɪˈjəː/