Definition of voxel in English:

voxel

noun

  • (in computer-based modelling or graphic simulation) each of an array of elements of volume that constitute a notional three-dimensional space, especially each of an array of discrete elements into which a representation of a three-dimensional object is divided.

    • ‘The values presented are the mean of nine voxels taken from the longitudinal images as shown in Figs 5 and 7.’
    • ‘In image reconstruction, the object is represented by a grid of pixels (picture elements) in two dimensions or voxels (volume elements) in three dimensions.’
    • ‘A small portion of the image surrounding one of the z lines, as indicated by the box in Fig.1 B, was magnified so that individual voxels could be seen.’
    • ‘The simulation box was divided into slices parallel to the xy plane and the atoms within these voxels were counted.’
    • ‘The mean number of water molecules contained in a definite volume is obtained by summing up the local density over all contributing voxels.’
    • ‘The grid is made up of small cubes called ‘voxels,’ and each voxel has a specific address.’
    • ‘A voxel (volume element) is defined as the individual picture element of a CT image, which has dimensions in the x and y plane, and includes the CT slice thickness as the third dimension (z axis).’
    • ‘The map demonstrates that, with our methods and subjects, changes in a voxel's gray matter fraction of 0.17 or less, depending on brain region, would have been detectable.’
    • ‘The internal voxels were then discarded, leaving the object surface only.’
    • ‘Our sensitivity map demonstrates that in all voxels we had sufficient power to detect changes in gray matter fraction of 0.17 or less.’
    • ‘The search engine works by converting stored CAD models and user-inputted sketches to voxels, the 3D equivalent of a pixel.’
    • ‘The loss of lung tissue associated with emphysema can be measured as a reduction in lung density by CT, using various parameters derived from the frequency distribution histogram of lung voxels.’
    • ‘Greene has pointed out the computational advantages of operating in voxel space for quickly checking for obstructions as well as determining direct lighting.’
    • ‘Thus, the signal from each image voxel is then proportional to the amount of blood that entered the voxel in the delay between the selective inversion pulse and the image acquisition.’

Origin

1970s: from the initial letters of volume and element, with the insertion of -x- for ease of pronunciation.

Pronunciation

voxel

/ˈvɒksɛl/