Definition of virtuous circle in English:

virtuous circle


  • A recurring cycle of events, the result of each one being to increase the beneficial effect of the next.

    ‘economic expansion would itself produce a virtuous circle of increased productivity, increased exports, and increased growth’
    • ‘So the virtuous circle of lower prices, higher sales and increased profits continues, seemingly unabated.’
    • ‘It is a virtuous circle: the brand gets better known, and if someone doesn't sign up on first seeing an advertisement, he or she may do so after further publication.’
    • ‘Credit and consumption, it was argued, formed a virtuous circle since from the immediate increase in prosperity would come the ability to pay off debt.’
    • ‘If you create an environment where the public have more confidence in the system, you create a virtuous circle.’
    • ‘He said: ‘We need to attract investment to create a virtuous circle in which increased economic activity leads to more investment and so on.’’
    • ‘The virtuous circle of rising productivity, falling unemployment and high growth, which has characterised the US economy over the past 10 years, seems to be coming to an end.’
    • ‘Ideally, the environment benefits from virtuous circles in which sustainable economic growth reduces poverty, increases resources available to improve the environment, and is itself reinforced by these trends.’
    • ‘Making material free should fuel a virtuous circle of increasing access.’
    • ‘The money raised is used to fund development programmes. ‘It's a virtuous circle for the US, and a vicious one for poor countries,’ says Pendleton.’
    • ‘The UK economy has been propelled along by consumers, creating a virtuous circle in which their spending creates jobs in the economy, which in turn generates more spending.’
    • ‘As is often the case, the whisky industry has shown the way by creating a virtuous circle out of location, tradition, reputation and marketing.’
    • ‘But a vicious circle is often just a virtuous circle in disguise. Increasing the flexibility in how we use super savings should make it politically easier to expand.’
    • ‘They see it as part of the virtuous circle of choice: by letting people choose, you not only empower them and force institutions to be more responsive, you give the institutions an incentive to be more efficient as well.’
    • ‘The reason, he claims, is that this will create a virtuous circle of new talent, entrepreneurship and - therefore - growth.’
    • ‘This has provided the extra prize-money, which is the crucial factor in creating the virtuous circle that produces better horses, bigger crowds and wider benefits.’
    • ‘This powers a virtuous circle: the more people cycle, the fewer cars are on the road, the safer and more attractive cycling becomes.’
    • ‘It let's people see the way you run your company and encourages people to question and interrogate it - creating a virtuous circle of improvement and self-awareness inside organisations that raises the whole level of the debate.’
    • ‘‘What you have got is a virtuous circle,’ he says.’
    • ‘These multilateral institutions provide help to states wishing to find their way back into the global economy and into the virtuous circle of investment and prosperity.’
    • ‘But we are more likely to establish a virtuous circle if the need for progress on reducing poverty is given a high public and political profile.’


virtuous circle