Definition of vindication in English:

vindication

noun

mass noun
  • 1The action of clearing someone of blame or suspicion.

    ‘I intend to work to ensure my full vindication’
    count noun ‘today's news is a complete vindication for us’
    • ‘The offer of amends signifies a willingness to place oneself in the hands of the court for assessing the appropriate steps to be taken by way of vindication and compensation.’
    • ‘The attorney for the parents called the ruling a vindication for his clients.’
    • ‘While it was too early to comment with finality on the hearing, yesterday's evidence was a vindication of the minister.’
    • ‘The claimant was not motivated by a desire for vindication, but was pursuing a vendetta.’
    • ‘Once an apology to the accused has been published, the element of vindication becomes less significant in quantifying the financial award.’
    1. 1.1 Proof that someone or something is right, reasonable, or justified.
      ‘the results were interpreted as vindication of the company's policy’
      count noun ‘democratic vindications of freedom of choice as a basic principle’
      • ‘Intolerant of dissent, he wrote several pamphlets replying robustly to vindications of separatism by the Presbyterian Owen and the deist Dodwell.’
      • ‘She summarized recent mathematical research and experimental vindications of Newton's theories.’
      • ‘Learning to love his outsider status has got him this far, which feels like a vindication.’
      • ‘This gave him a sense of vindication in his decision to flee.’
      • ‘The program's success is vindication for the Stanford professor.’

Pronunciation

vindication

/vɪndɪˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/