Definition of vin de garde in English:

vin de garde

noun

mass noun
  • Wine which will significantly improve in quality if left to mature.

    • ‘Tannin levels were relatively high and the sheer extract of the wines will ensure a certain amount of vins de garde from this vintage.’
    • ‘The Edouard, in French terms, is a vin de garde - a wine to put away for some years.’
    • ‘Conventional winemaking has several disadvantages for vins de garde (wines intended for cellaring).’
    • ‘When they're young, they're unbalanced (young red vins de garde often have tannins that smother the fruit flavours), but over time the components integrate and harmonize.’
    • ‘This is one 1997 that is a vin de garde, with an aging potential of 15 or more years.’
    • ‘Along with The Domaine Leroy, Bernard Dugat makes the most vin de garde Pinot Noir in the world.’
    • ‘Traditionally in Saint-Emilion, wines for laying down - vins de garde - are matured in 225-litre oak barrels and lasts an average of 16 to 18 months.’
    • ‘Overall, however, it appears that there will be many vins de garde, with high tannins and good structure.’
    • ‘These aren't vins de garde, though they have lovely aromatic purity and very clear fruit.’
    • ‘But there have always been wines to counterbalance what the French call vins de garde, things like Beaujolais and Pouilly-Fuissé, Chianti and dolcetto d' Alba, New Zealand Sauvignon blanc and inexpensive Aussie Shiraz.’
    • ‘I suspect they are true vins de garde and will blossom with five or more years in bottle, but let's see.’
    • ‘It sounds like a recipe for a great vin de garde, and certainly the wines do have a following.’
    • ‘Inspired by the name of the village closest to the estate, Yianakohori is produced from selected grapes and makes an excellent vin de garde.’
    • ‘And if one waits until the finest vins de garde (wines for keeping) and exceptional vintages reach their optimal maturity, it will offer a unique bouquet, including truffle, undergrowth, and musk.’
    • ‘I'd say the 1999s are really vins de garde.’
    • ‘A classic vin de garde, the 2005 will last for 40-50 years.’
    • ‘A vin de garde, this should continue to evolve ever more subtle scents and flavors over the next decade or more.’
    • ‘These wines are vinified to be vins de garde, that is, wines meant to be aged to bring out their full potential.’
    • ‘Dense ruby/blue/purple to the rim, this is no wimpy wine, tipping the scales at 15.8% alcohol, but the higher than normal acidity and moderately high tannins give it a decidedly vin de garde style that promises a considerably long life.’
    • ‘We make a light, summer red, which you should drink slightly chilled (Cuvée de Printemps), a vin de terroir, into which, whenever possible, we try to incorporate as many of the different varietals as we can, and then we have a vin de garde, which has a higher proportion of Cabernet Sauvignon in it.’

Origin

French, literally ‘wine for keeping’.

Pronunciation

vin de garde

/ˌvã də ˈɡɑːd/