Definition of vestibule in English:

vestibule

noun

  • 1An antechamber, hall, or lobby next to the outer door of a building.

    • ‘Visitors entered through the Octagon Hall also known as the entrance hall vestibule.’
    • ‘Access is from the entry foyer via transition stairs and ramped vestibules that also act as gallery spaces.’
    • ‘Over the entrance vestibule is a chapel with priest's chamber.’
    • ‘He stood in the small vestibule locking the door to his office for the night.’
    • ‘These might have been placed in the entry vestibule or in the small reading room situated at the center of the exhibition.’
    • ‘The main room was a rectangle with various antechambers and vestibules branching off down its length.’
    • ‘A vestibule behind and to the left provides access to the building's interior at grade, in effect a bridge over this sunken area.’
    • ‘The public entrance penetrates the knuckle between the angled wing and the auditorium leading to a vestibule that gives access to the concert hall foyer and promenading space at ground level.’
    • ‘By the time we leave around 1pm, they're backed up through the vestibule into the snow on Spring Street.’
    • ‘The interior finish has been largely retained, and is complemented by an entrance vestibule and 24 ft reception hall with hardwood flooring.’
    • ‘Father walked with them to the vestibule and put an arm around each of their shoulders.’
    • ‘These elevators should ideally be protected by a pressurized vestibule from the elevator lobby or direct access to the stair from the elevator lobby if a vestibule is not feasible.’
    • ‘The trio rounded the end of the shelves and saw a crouched form behind the stone archway that made up the division between the vestibule and the main hall of the library.’
    • ‘The last monk paused in the vestibule and looked back at Ford and Travis.’
    • ‘Similar to an air-curtain in a vestibule, it eliminates infectious agents from anyone entering the room.’
    • ‘The project spanned two years and includes not only the kitchen and family room, but also a reworked living room and vestibule.’
    • ‘When Caleb could no longer hear his footsteps ascending the staircase outside the parlor, he rested the poker against the mantel and turned back toward the vestibule.’
    • ‘If you had walked into the living room from the vestibule, the painting would be on the wall facing you.’
    • ‘She made it a point to rearrange donated canned goods in the outer vestibule to insure that Jimmy's heard her enter.’
    • ‘Downspouts from the main roof deliver rainwater to a rooftop garden over the entry vestibule.’
    entrance hall, hall, hallway, entrance, porch, portico, foyer, reception area, lobby, anteroom, antechamber, outer room, waiting room
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    1. 1.1 An enclosed entrance compartment in a railway carriage.
      • ‘We got to ride while standing in the vestibule at the end of the train talking to the crew.’
      • ‘Why else, then, do I hang out in the vestibules of trains, when a comfortable seat is at hand in the car behind me?’
      • ‘He did not apologize, put down the step stool or offer to help put our hand carries in the vestibule.’
      • ‘Just as a conductor got near us, he had to go to the vestibule once more.’
  • 2Anatomy
    A chamber or channel opening into another, in particular:

    • ‘No clear correlation was observed between the number of chloride ions present in the channel vestibule and the probability of water-filled state of the constriction.’
    • ‘Seven side channels lead from the vestibule to the cell's exterior, exiting near the membrane surface.’
    • ‘This appears to be a reasonable choice for the threefold channel, which is formed by wide vestibules and has only a short neck region.’
    • ‘The undulations of the bilayer in those vestibules could obliterate the access to the channel causing brief flickers.’
    • ‘The reason is that the toxins have a conical shape, which is complementary to the channel conical vestibule.’
    1. 2.1 The central cavity of the labyrinth of the inner ear.
      • ‘Maximal exposure is required if safe total tumour removal is to be achieved however the surgeon must avoid inadvertent injury to the cochlea, superior semicircular canal, vestibule or the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve.’
      • ‘The perception of spatial movement and orientation of the body as a whole also involves a fluid filled receptor system located in the vestibules of the inner ear.’
    2. 2.2 The part of the mouth outside the teeth.
    3. 2.3 The space in the vulva into which both the urethra and vagina open.

Origin

Early 17th century (denoting the space in front of the main entrance of a classical Roman or Greek building): from French, or from Latin vestibulum entrance court.

Pronunciation:

vestibule

/ˈvɛstɪbjuːl/