Definition of versus in English:

versus

(also v, v., vs)

preposition

  • 1Against (especially in sporting and legal use)

    ‘England versus Australia’
    • ‘Kingussie now meet the winners of the Lochcarron versus Skye tie which was one of the day's casualties.’
    • ‘Liverpool versus Manchester United games are always big matches, for the players and the fans.’
    • ‘Last weekend it had the game of the season so far - Manchester United versus Chelsea at Old Trafford.’
    • ‘It was another striker versus goalkeeper confrontation which ought to have gone to the man in possession.’
    • ‘We leafleted the Oldham versus Bury local derby football game and got a great response.’
    • ‘The Yankee pen has been shaky all year and needed El Duque to get a big out versus Oakland.’
    • ‘No single sporting event carries quite the emotional freight of England versus Germany at football.’
    • ‘The North Bank versus South Bank contest became the highlight of the local sporting calendar.’
    • ‘St Joseph's will now meet the winners of the Ballyvarley versus First Dromara match.’
    • ‘It is like India versus Australia in cricket or whatever, the one we want to get excited about.’
    • ‘The pairings were Embassy against Wilson Panthers and Cinzano versus Granwood.’
    • ‘Nairn County versus Rothes was postponed because of a waterlogged park.’
    • ‘The National team is currently embroiled in an exhibition tour in B.C. versus Japan.’
    • ‘Red Kitching thinks that the Liverpool versus Newcastle United tie could end a managerial career.’
    • ‘During Euro 2000, I went to watch Spain versus Slovenia with Bobby and a friend of his.’
    1. 1.1 As opposed to; in contrast to.
      ‘weighing up the pros and cons of organic versus inorganic produce’
      • ‘The topic also questioned the differences between brands, and indoor wheels versus outdoor wheels.’
      • ‘Firstly there is almost no research directly addressing the issues of early versus late separation.’
      • ‘As always happens in such situations, the end result is likely to be a bitter club versus country war of words.’
      • ‘There has to be a balance between the performance of the game versus the quality of the graphics.’
      • ‘The study may help show when disclosure can be helpful versus harmful.’
      • ‘Weighing infringing uses of technology versus non-infringing uses is a tricky matter to be sure.’
      • ‘His use of opaque versus open areas and his deft use of patterning versus flat color is especially noteworthy.’
      • ‘Policy considerations of crime control versus due process come into play.’
      • ‘In the snooker handicap final it was another case of youth versus experience.’
      • ‘This lays the basis for endless debates about the risks of heroin versus ecstasy, or cannabis versus steroids.’
      • ‘The trope of opening night is related to a thematic motif: disaster versus success.’
      • ‘This was a contest of youthful enthusiasm and fitness of the visitors versus the experience and guile of the home side.’
      • ‘It'd be interesting to do a clinical analysis of intention versus outcome.’
      • ‘As for Dell, meanwhile, Livermore played the innovation versus commodity card.’
      • ‘The good versus evil theme gets a bit of a work out, as people try to demonize Leland.’
      • ‘Your friend can play the opposite role of passive versus aggressive and so on.’
      • ‘More detailed studies are needed on the costs of rural versus urban car usage.’
      • ‘Isn't there a conflict between minority and collective rights versus individual rights?’
      • ‘There are numerous fixtures featuring the desperate versus the indifferent.’
      • ‘The matter of UK versus US English continues to provoke erudite and informed opinion.’
      opposed to, in opposition to, hostile to, averse to, antagonistic towards, inimical to, unsympathetic to, resistant to, at odds with, in disagreement with, contra
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Origin

Late Middle English: from a medieval Latin use of Latin versus ‘towards’.

Pronunciation

versus

/ˈvəːsəs/