Definition of verity in English:



  • 1A true principle or belief, especially one of fundamental importance.

    ‘the eternal verities’
    • ‘Do these remnants pledged to eternal verities have any prospect of succeeding with contemporary children?’
    • ‘The theme of her remarks as she opened the new synod concerned the challenges of staying true to unchanging verities in a world of constant change and new challenges.’
    • ‘The author looks at the different issues and technologies affecting time, and concludes it is the most important of the verities.’
    • ‘One often hears the comment that each new generation rediscovers the eternal verities.’
    • ‘We must remind ourselves of what Faulkner called ‘the old verities and truths of the heart’.’
    • ‘You are full of enthusiasm for the eternal verities - life is worth living, and then out of sinful curiosity you open a newspaper.’
    • ‘To quote the eternal verities of the Muppet Show: ‘It is at times like these that I am proud to be an American Bald Eagle.’’
    • ‘No, we need something that will * really * get the Church in touch with the eternal verities for which contemporary American culture stands!’
    • ‘This year, the principle will be treated as an eternal verity.’
    • ‘In a world where all nonrelativistic truth has been abolished, the relativity principle itself is proclaimed as a universal verity.’
    • ‘She's no nostalgia merchant for the musical Luddites, and it's not just the eternal verities of soul music that Jones traffics in.’
    • ‘The others challenged the eternal verities of the West, and the critics hated them.’
    • ‘To those of us who have not forgotten the eternal verities, he has summed up perfectly today's pundit herd of Washington and Wall Street.’
    • ‘Teshigawara inhabits a world of eternal verities.’
    • ‘Cynics will charge that these are the eternal verities of political classes everywhere.’
    the truth, the whole truth, the naked truth, gospel truth, god's truth, the honest truth
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    1. 1.1[mass noun]Truth.
      ‘irrefutable, objective verity’
      • ‘Yet with The Quiet American, Noyce aims at verity, not controversy; he seeks admission, not outrage.’
      • ‘Their over-educated leader, Mr Mugabe, illustrates perfectly the verity of an ancient proverb: much learning does not teach sense.’
      • ‘I'm not sure I agree with my health warning, below, but who am I to doubt the verity of an internet quiz?’
      • ‘The deal is, he writes better stuff, but I'm more prolific, thus illustrating the eternal economic verity: Quality.’
      • ‘The timeliness and verity of this admonition is not arguable.’
      • ‘And once that kind of liberal verity of free speech seems to be under threat, then the commentators come out and criticism rains down.’
      • ‘They argued that discussion led to verity and gave enlightened public opinion the force of law.’
      • ‘David, the meticulous neoclassicist, insisted upon the verity of his work.’
      • ‘Are you sometimes concerned about the verity of what you read on the internet?’
      • ‘In fact, a case can be made that the Internet in general represent the new Truth Police in an era of increasingly elusive verity.’
      • ‘The unspoken underlying verity was that there were no residents of Abu Hishma who would voluntarily turn them over.’
      • ‘I imagine Winthrop and myself in these respective roles and almost choke on my drink at the ludicrousness but strange verity of the thought.’
      fact, verity, certainty, certitude
      veracity, truthfulness, verity, sincerity, candour, honesty, genuineness
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Late Middle English: from Old French verite, from Latin veritas, from verus true.