Definition of vera causa in English:

vera causa

noun

historical
  • (in Newtonian philosophy) the true cause of a natural phenomenon, by an agency whose existence is independently evidenced.

    • ‘An unconscious idea is neither a vera causa nor a fact ultimately to be verified.’
    • ‘Explanation meant first detecting a vera causa, identifying a theoretically competent cause.’
    • ‘They admit variation as a vera causa in one case, they arbitrarily reject it in another, without assigning any distinction in the two cases.’
    • ‘But the doctrine of the vera causa has nothing to do with elementary conceptions.’
    • ‘This element of Newton's first Rule we can call by its common name, the vera causa principle.’

Origin

Latin, literally real cause.

Pronunciation:

vera causa

/ˌvɛːrə ˈkaʊzə/