Definition of venture in English:

venture

noun

  • 1A risky or daring journey or undertaking.

    ‘pioneering ventures into little-known waters’
    • ‘Doubts about the success of such a risky venture were soon put on the backburner as cinemagoers thronged to cinema halls.’
    • ‘Your bold nature will make you undertake risky ventures.’
    • ‘‘This was always a risky venture but it has been done in style thanks to the dedication and commitment of all involved,’ he said.’
    • ‘The withdrawal of Old School Baptists allowed missionary Baptist associations to pursue cooperative ventures.’
    • ‘This, like for every drug discovery in the world, is also a risky venture with dubious chances of success.’
    • ‘Collins said the venture is potentially risky but the time is right to study the possibility.’
    • ‘While Billie's acting career is forging ahead, Chris' latest TV ventures have flopped.’
    • ‘Grateful thanks was extended to all who put so much work into bringing the venture to fruition.’
    • ‘I came up with the idea at a venture capitalist firm.’
    • ‘Sometimes those test cases are, by their very nature, very, very risky ventures.’
    • ‘Now, in his first solo venture, he faces a daunting task.’
    • ‘Allowing bloggers be the reviewers is potentially a risky venture, depending on how powerful you think blogs really are.’
    • ‘Presenting this sketch as a public performance in Belfast, Mayne remembers, was ‘a daring venture.’’
    • ‘She walked through the door on the opening night of his first solo venture back in 1978.’
    • ‘For such a risky venture, the reasons for straying outside that safety zone of London is to pick-up more fans.’
    • ‘Several white European women shared the results of their ventures into African territory.’
    • ‘It seemed a risky venture: print-runs had to be huge and cheap paper was used.’
    • ‘But you shouldn't mix up the venture failing with the person failing.’
    • ‘As a result Hollywood tries to avoid any risky ventures and is keen to fund tried and tested genres.’
    • ‘I still think I'm right, but it's probably too risky a venture.’
    expedition, adventure, journey, voyage, trek, travels, odyssey, wandering, journeying, exploration, search, undertaking
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A business enterprise, typically one that involves risk.
      ‘a joint venture between two aircraft manufacturers’
      • ‘They simply change employers or pursue entrepreneurial ventures.’
      • ‘Find out how the most successful e-commerce ventures help customers help themselves.’
      • ‘After all, the time to get in on an e-commerce venture has come and gone.’
      • ‘The competition was more like those run by government agencies or major foundations than an agile start-up venture.’
      • ‘The goals of Bard's collaborative ventures were established jointly with our partners abroad.’
      • ‘Life insurance became a profitable commercial venture provided by firms such as the Prudential.’
      • ‘Thanks to all who so generously supported the fund-raising venture.’
      • ‘Wait for clarity and totality before starting a new business venture.’
      • ‘Lately, successful joint ventures with foreign partners produce consumer goods.’
      • ‘One can turn his ideas into profitable ventures with the use of 3D.’
      • ‘In today's overheated financial markets, euphoric investors are once again happily financing risky ventures.’
      • ‘Others say they might invest in an Internet venture and its stock shoots up.’
      • ‘He's starting a new business venture here.’
      • ‘Last year, analysts were putting a valuation of e150 million on the business-to-business e-commerce venture.’
      • ‘His Honour made a finding that this venture failed very soon after inception in 1990.’
      • ‘The money was not paid under the terms of the joint venture agreement.’
      • ‘She started her entrepreneurial venture three years ago, distributing chocolates to her friends and acquaintances.’
      • ‘They're government agencies that use public money to underwrite risky private ventures.’
      • ‘The gimmick is part of the company's latest venture to target the UK's 3.2m students in higher education.’
      • ‘Ms Browning's latest venture involves the launch of an organic fast food truck, called the Flying Pig.’
      enterprise, undertaking, project, scheme, pursuit, operation, endeavour, campaign, activity, act, deed, move, measure, task, exploit, mission, adventure, trial
      View synonyms

verb

  • 1no object, with adverbial Undertake a risky or daring journey or course of action.

    ‘she ventured out into the blizzard’
    • ‘As she moved from the cave, her head slowly ventured out into the sunlight.’
    • ‘The course ended on a windy Friday night when some adventurous sailors ventured out for a ‘plane’ across the bay.’
    • ‘The venture aims to open five to 10 stores per year.’
    • ‘He of course, ventured out there everyday, occasionally dragging Amina along.’
    • ‘After the long weekend's excess, it was only the dedicated disciples of dance that ventured out this cold and frosty night.’
    • ‘Last Wednesday, wearing several layers of Factor 60 and a large hat, I ventured out, keeping to the shade whenever I could.’
    • ‘I ventured out to the grocery store and it was nearly deserted.’
    • ‘Her prescription - substituting therapy for justice - ventures into dangerous moral territory.’
    • ‘Up until last Sunday, only 76 runners had ventured out of Warren Place, just 13 returning with a win under their belts.’
    • ‘Occasional gunfire could be heard in the streets, and few British soldiers ventured out of their Warrior and Challenger II tanks.’
    • ‘Only the college hostel girls ventured out to buy snacks.’
    • ‘That seems a little extreme to me, but I decided that I would try this out while I ventured out on yet another first date last night.’
    • ‘I really knew I'd made progress when I ventured out the gate and down the trail aboard Topper.’
    • ‘Ash went to bed and we ventured out into Manhattan.’
    • ‘Chris even ventured out and tried his skipping skills while he was timed by 1983 world athletics champion, Eamon Coughlan.’
    • ‘Essex Green is really poppy and cute and sometimes ventures into trippy alt-country territory.’
    • ‘Later on that night, I ventured out with my friends to Dupont Circle.’
    • ‘I ventured out tonight, and made a few comments here and there.’
    • ‘And after the agitation started they never even ventured out.’
    • ‘And then, somewhat shamefacedly, I ventured out into the garden.’
    travel, journey, go, move, proceed, progress, set out, set forth, rove
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    1. 1.1with object Expose to the risk of loss.
      ‘agents for other people's money, they do not venture their own capital’
      • ‘No one would venture such capital without some chance of generating a return on investment.’
      • ‘For an investment bank expert in venture capital, nothing has been ventured here and nothing gained.’
      • ‘The general point that emerges from these thought experiments is that much may be ventured, at great risk, for very small gains.’
      • ‘Kerry compounded the problem by venturing no information about his public career in the Senate for the past two decades.’
      • ‘Without venturing a judgment on Israel's method of retaliation, Mr Rumsfeld suggested the US would take stern measures under similar circumstances.’
      • ‘If a man is venturing his own money, this is the only risk which is relevant.’
      bet, wager, gamble, stake, hazard, risk, chance
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  • 2no object, with infinitive Dare to do or say something that may be considered audacious (often used as a polite expression of hesitation or apology)

    ‘may I venture to add a few comments?’
    with object ‘he ventured the opinion that Putt was insane’
    • ‘We ventured a guess that it was a ‘long shot’ at the time but our loyal readers have come to the rescue yet again.’
    • ‘We ventured a guess that she wasn't off to moderate a ‘Successful Selling Schemes’ seminar.’
    • ‘If he were a betting man, he would venture a wager that she was uncomfortable with the position she was now in where it came to him.’
    • ‘Which is why I am venturing to write this column on last week's encounter in Ahmedabad.’
    • ‘Ever noticed how a woman is ignored if she dares to venture an opinion on the weekend's football game?’
    • ‘I am venturing to write you this email for introducing our company as one of the professional exporters of car audio from China.’
    • ‘Part travel log, part art history primer, it elegantly provides the context for Klett's life's work without venturing much in the way of criticism.’
    • ‘Without abandoning her earlier assessment of Jeff Tweedy's performance, she ventured a more complex answer.’
    • ‘Dare I venture to ‘guesstimate’ a not inconsiderable number!’
    • ‘Again, no one has ventured a coherent explanation of this theory, let alone bothered to hint at what the evidence for it might be.’
    • ‘I ventured that science, research and technology are the only things which will get us out of the hole we're very likely digging even now.’
    • ‘He ventures the notion of ‘publicisation’ to rival the Tories' privatisation project.’
    • ‘Accountants on the other hand stick to the letter of the detail, rarely venturing even informed opinions.’
    • ‘She ventures a few speculations about the woman with whom he likely had a long relationship.’
    • ‘And she ventures a few guesses on why it's not happened thus far.’
    • ‘I remember overhearing them speaking French to one another and venturing a ‘bonjour.’’
    • ‘Apparently not, or so I was told by my wife before I had even ventured to express an opinion or a comment on the subject.’
    • ‘Occasionally, Ducros - who is French - quietly ventures a suggestion about some nuance of diction.’
    • ‘Stephen even ventures the possibility of a change of name and even in its remit of building a knowledge economy.’
    • ‘I'm venturing a guess that most of those people would swap that for having insulting signs written on their bodies any day.’
    put forward, volunteer, advance, submit, proffer, offer, air, bring up, suggest, propound, posit, propose, moot, ventilate, table, broach, lodge, introduce, put up, present
    dare, make so bold as, be so bold as, presume, have the temerity, have the effrontery, have the audacity, have the nerve, be brave enough, have the courage, go so far as
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • at a venture

    • archaic Trusting to chance rather than to previous consideration or preparation.

      ‘a man drew a bow at a venture’
      • ‘And a certain man drew a bow at a venture, and smote the king of Israel between the joints of the harness.’
      • ‘So he went down the staircase at a venture, without any idea where to go.’
  • nothing ventured, nothing gained

    • proverb You can't expect to achieve anything if you never take any risks.

      • ‘It is a shot in the dark, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.’
      • ‘What did I say about nothing ventured, nothing gained?’
      • ‘Still, nothing ventured, nothing gained, and we took the day off to get lunch at IKEA and buy another pack of gummy anti-slip mesh stuff.’
      • ‘However, nothing ventured, nothing gained, I hunted around to see if I could find either one of my two watercolour boxes.’
      • ‘‘It's a case of nothing ventured, nothing gained,’ Simon said.’
      • ‘Better to be safe than sorry, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.’
      • ‘Let us try to go into some of the principles anyway, remembering that nothing ventured, nothing gained.’
      • ‘I know you always thought it was too risky, but nothing ventured, nothing gained, eh?’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘adventure’, also ‘risk the loss of’): shortening of adventure.

Pronunciation

venture

/ˈvɛntʃə/