Main definitions of vent in English

: vent1vent2

vent1

noun

  • 1An opening that allows air, gas, or liquid to pass out of or into a confined space:

    ‘remove any debris blocking the vents’
    • ‘Roll pastry for the upper crust, and cut a design for steam vents.’
    • ‘The bathrooms and kitchen are exhaust rooms, with exhaust vents to the outside.’
    • ‘When I purchased the property, my home inspector said I should install foundation vents.’
    • ‘Cut a small vent hole in the center of the parchment circle and set aside.’
    • ‘They suffocated after an air vent was closed.’
    • ‘A proper attic vent system consists of an intake and an exhaust.’
    • ‘Then I unscrewed the vent and pushed it aside.’
    • ‘Make sure jars have tight lids and are kept away from sunlight and heating vents.’
    • ‘With a clothes dryer, check the outside dryer vent cap where it exits the house.’
    • ‘Closing the roof vents and covering the fan when not in use will also reduce air movement through the grain.’
    • ‘Lucie and Matt crawled through the musty vent shaft.’
    • ‘Aelex glared angrily through the smoke vent at the top of the tent.’
    • ‘Another conspicuous feature is the large vent hole on the top of the case.’
    • ‘According to the mechanical code, dryer vent ducts must be made of metal.’
    • ‘Security of air intake vents is important, especially for high-rises and large sports facilities.’
    • ‘One alternative to the traditional metal or colored plastic roof vents is to use a continuous ridge vent.’
    • ‘A metal vent cover hit the floor of an alleyway with a large clatter.’
    • ‘Jessie went to open all the vents while Alicia went to Jamaal's bedroom.’
    • ‘The slanted light from the vent cover not far behind her illuminated her silhouette.’
    • ‘Right then, a purple gas escaped from vents at the top of his hallow prison.’
    outlet, inlet, opening, aperture, vent hole, hole, gap, orifice, space, cavity, cleft, slit, pore, port
    duct, flue, shaft, channel, well, passage, air passage, airway, blowhole, breather
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The opening of a volcano, through which lava and other materials are emitted:
      ‘pumice fragments pile up to form a conical heap round the vent’
      • ‘Approximately 80% of the total lava volume was erupted from the 2100 m and the 2550 m vents.’
      • ‘I remember Hawaiian native friends fighting the Vatican, which wanted to tap their sacred geothermal vents.’
      • ‘Columnar joints are best developed in sills and dykes, volcanic vents, and former lava lakes.’
      • ‘A box had been erected over a volcanic vent from which issued sulfurous vapors.’
      • ‘Sliding and colliding, separating and fragmenting, great trenches are forming, and volcanoes and vents are being created.’
      • ‘Lava moves away from the vent toward the ocean in a network of tubes and descends Pulama pali in several separate tubes.’
      • ‘Did life originate on Mars or in hot volcanic vents here on Earth?’
      • ‘Laid in burrows or under mounds, megapode eggs are incubated by the warmth of the sun, rotting vegetation, or volcanic vents.’
      • ‘The ringmaster then waved his hand and the earth opened up, revealing a vent filled with hot magma.’
      • ‘The lava from the Undara volcano travelled 164 km to create the longest lava flow from one single vent in modern geological time.’
      • ‘Water cascades over the yellow rocks and soil of the Galway Soufriere volcanic vent.’
      • ‘These new vents remained phreatomagmatic until 25 July, when the activity changed for 5 days to Strombolian and effusive.’
      • ‘Today, some hope to use volcanic steam vents to generate energy.’
      • ‘Recent research around volcanic vents has found tiny organisms that breathe iron.’
      • ‘They all have no nucleus and survive in the highest atmosphere, the hottest volcanic vents, and everywhere in between.’
    2. 1.2Scottish A flue of a chimney.
      • ‘It had several openings for doors and windows, plus a chimney vent on each end.’
      • ‘A metallic maze of chimneys, pipes and vents glitters on the horizon in the desert outside Khartoum, dominating the landscape for miles around.’
      • ‘Have chimneys and vents inspected when installing or changing vented heating appliances.’
    3. 1.3historical The touch hole of a gun.
    4. 1.4 The anus, especially one in a lower animal such as a fish that serves for both excretion and reproduction.
      • ‘In breeding plumage, it has a black body and head, silvery gray wings and a white vent.’
      • ‘Researchers suspected that many, if not most, of the vent animals must produce larvae capable of dispersing through cold ocean water to new sites.’
      • ‘Birds in all plumages have yellow around their vents.’
      • ‘Male has grey plumage with silvery flight feathers and rusty vent.’
      • ‘Torrent salamanders are characterized by unique squared-off glands behind the vent in adult males.’
  • 2[mass noun] The release or expression of a strong emotion, energy, etc.:

    ‘children give vent to their anger in various ways’
    • ‘I am disappointed that The Peak would give vent to such immature gibbering.’
    • ‘I think he was reciting - giving vent to some knowledge, as it were.’
    • ‘Only occasionally does he give vent to some of the emotions he has spent the past two years repressing.’
    • ‘In expressive politics, people prefer to give vent to their opinions instead of rolling up their sleeves to work for change.’
    • ‘The best way to give vent to an emotion is to put it on a paper.’
    • ‘Chanted poems give vent to emotions like sorrow at a friend's departure.’
    • ‘As I say, I understand people are frustrated, and sometimes they give vent to that frustration.’
    • ‘When the time was appropriate to give vent to her wish, she just exploded without even a proper training or a formal ‘guru’.’
    • ‘They did, if anything, give vent to heightened animosity between the two peoples.’
    • ‘He also encouraged children to explore their creative talents and give vent to their expression.’
    • ‘Last night, he gave full vent to his spleen.’
    • ‘It also provided them the much-awaited opportunity to give vent to their creative energy.’
    • ‘For the next six days it will be creativity unplugged as the artists wield brush and give vent to their ideas.’
    • ‘However, that is just me giving vent to a little steam.’
    • ‘There are times when these individuals have a desire to give vent to their emotions.’
    • ‘The audience however enjoyed the production and gave full vent to their feelings with thunderous applause at the conclusion.’
    • ‘On the other hand for those wanting to give vent to their frustration, the hit-me-doll is the right kind for you.’
    • ‘Particularly, there were events that gave students an opportunity to give vent to their creative instincts.’
    • ‘Beyond giving vent to frustrations at a relationship gone seriously awry, such rhetoric augurs a troubled future.’
    • ‘Singers are allowed to give full vent to their emotions, with little stylization.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Give free expression to (a strong emotion):

    ‘we vent our spleen on drug barons’
    • ‘After the match, the fans vented their respective spleens in the Matchday Mailbox.’
    • ‘Just being able to vent out my emotions to Becky made me feel that much better.’
    • ‘With Lawson at his mercy, Cal is free to vent his anger on his betrayer.’
    • ‘Suddenly, with an explosive outburst, he vents his ire on the crowd.’
    • ‘In no small measure, the Chinese fans may have tried to vent their frustration by expressing it in anti-Japanese gestures.’
    • ‘The lowest home crowd for a decade vented their fury at the final whistle.’
    • ‘So we felt it was the appropriate time where people can vent all their anger and frustration instead.’
    • ‘The group spokesman had used this issue to vent his ire against Mr. Raghavan.’
    • ‘Writing it all down was Ann's way of venting her raw emotions.’
    • ‘Academic feminism has provided a forum for Third World women to express themselves and vent their anger at their societies.’
    • ‘Kicking on the grass in frustration, Valerie tried to vent out her anger.’
    • ‘People vented their fury at the police at an emergency public meeting on Monday night.’
    • ‘The only thing left to do is to vent all the anger and hate on the divorced mate.’
    • ‘He was no longer talking to her, merely venting his rage out loud.’
    • ‘Echoes of " die, Glazer die " rumbled around Old Trafford as about 300 fans vented their frustration.’
    • ‘Dolly took full advantage of the outrageous disruption to vent her bad temper and to express her extreme displeasure in all directions.’
    • ‘This is a safe way to vent your emotions without alienating your co-workers.’
    • ‘Sam growled into the speaker and vented all his inner frustration by banging his poor fist onto the oak tabletop.’
    • ‘Angry England fans vented their frustration at their team's shock last-minute defeat by France last night.’
    • ‘His face was turning a shade of purple as he vented his rage.’
    let out, give vent to, give free rein to, release, pour out, emit, discharge
    reveal, bring into the open, come out with, express, give expression to, air, communicate, utter, voice, give voice to, verbalize, articulate, broadcast, make public, proclaim, assert, ventilate, find an outlet for
    View synonyms
  • 2Provide with an outlet for air, gas, or liquid:

    ‘tumble-dryers must be vented to the outside’
    • ‘All gas appliances except ranges/stoves must be vented to the outdoors.’
    • ‘From there, the duct can be turned in any direction and vented to the outside.’
    • ‘As our CLs expand then we must vent them off through mouth/nose or the next thing we know we are on the surface.’
    • ‘Some stores sell special vent buckets for venting dryers indoors.’
    • ‘The builder may say all the exhausts are vented to the outside, but you should verify this, he advised.’
    • ‘The room is also plumbed for a washing machine and is vented for a dryer.’
    • ‘If you vent the exhaust outside, use the straightest and shortest metal duct available.’
    • ‘Volatile solvents must be stored in fire safety cabinets with venting to the outside of the building where possible.’
    • ‘Use ridged flex aluminum or ridged four-inch elbows and straight vent pipe to vent your dryer.’
    • ‘Your clothes dryer should be vented directly to the outside.’
    • ‘I have no memory of climbing into my space suit and double-checking all the seals before I must have vented the airlock.’
    • ‘To be safe, all types of pressure canners must be vented 10 minutes before they are pressurized.’
    • ‘It may be a washer or dryer not properly vented to the outside, or it may be standing water under the house.’
    • ‘There is also plumbing for a washing machine and a dishwasher, as well as venting for a tumble dryer.’
    • ‘If a gas clothes dryer is improperly vented, deadly carbon monoxide can be forced back into a home.’
    • ‘There is plumbing for a washing machine and the room is vented for a tumble dryer.’
    • ‘This happens after the top and bottom webs have been sealed and just before the die is vented to the outside atmosphere.’
    • ‘Most of the radiant style heaters do not need to be vented to the outside, which greatly simplifies installation.’
    • ‘You stated that clothes dryers should not vent into a garage but must have a duct leading to the outside of the building.’
    1. 2.1 Discharge or expel (air, gas, or liquid) through an outlet:
      ‘the plant was isolated and the gas vented’
      • ‘Enceladus, a tiny moon orbiting Saturn, appears to be venting water into space from a series of fractures over its south pole.’
      • ‘You can do this by using an air cleaner, venting all gas appliances to the outside, and avoiding wood fires in your house.’
      • ‘For two years a mobile flare stack has been in operation to vent the gas and reduce unpleasant smells.’
      • ‘The air exhausters are used to vent the air displaced by airbag deployment and to contribute to cabin air.’
      • ‘The central atrium acts as a stack for venting hot air.’
      • ‘Aeration treatment involves spraying water or mixing it with air, and then venting the air from the water before use.’
      • ‘The ports are as high on the barrel as possible, to vent gas up rather than sideways.’
      • ‘And has anyone calculated the effect of methane vented directly to the atmosphere?’
      • ‘If you are found to vent that refrigerant in any way that was preventable, you could lose your licence and you'll be out of business.’
      • ‘Expended gas is vented from the rear of your sub, making its way to the surface in a stream of bubbles.’
      • ‘In Nigeria, flared or vented natural gas exceed 2 billion cubic feet per day.’
      • ‘In summer, hot air is vented out this chimney, and a sedum-planted roof reduces heat gain.’
      • ‘Behind them, the stone-and-snow cone of Mount Erebus vents its volcanic breath, reminding them there is land here.’
      • ‘Two escape holes in the receiver ring are intended to vent escaping gases away from the shooter.’
      • ‘In a passive system, the gas is naturally vented into the atmosphere, and may include venting trenches, cutoff walls, or gas vents to direct the gas.’
      • ‘The case failed and the action controlled and vented the escaping gases away from the shooter, just as its designers intended.’
      • ‘The ULDB is completely sealed, so gas is not vented to relieve pressure.’
      • ‘The sump tube contains three lumens - one to vent air, one for infusion of irrigating solution, and one for drainage of debris.’
      • ‘Shirley should have seen bubbles burbling up as Shaw vented the expanding gases in his rebreather and drysuit.’
      • ‘Instead, they vent the hot gases horizontally through exhaust pipes.’
    2. 2.2 Permit air to enter (a beer cask):
      ‘once the beer has been vented, the cask must be sold within three or four days’

Origin

Late Middle English: partly from French vent wind, from Latin ventus, reinforced by French évent, from éventer expose to air, based on Latin ventus wind.

Pronunciation:

vent

/vɛnt/

Main definitions of vent in English

: vent1vent2

vent2

noun

  • An opening or slit in a garment, especially in the lower part of the seam at the back of a coat.

    • ‘The shirt features a casual button-down front with chest pocket (men's only) and side vents.’
    • ‘It's fully lined with Bemberg rayon and features a discreet chest pocket, front flap pockets, and a back vent.’
    • ‘An ‘American’ jacket has a single vent in the middle of the garment.’
    • ‘Figure-hugging silhouettes are accented by zippered pockets, panels and side vents.’
    • ‘The style is tight-fitting with side vents and an elastic waistband, typically made out of cotton or cotton/polyester blend jersey knit.’
    • ‘The ventral slit is a vent on the obverse side which is neater, transforming the jumper from a tight crew-neck to a comfier V-neck.’
    • ‘Garment features a self-tailored collar, three-button placket and a straight hem bottom with side vents.’
    • ‘I shortened my skirt by 7 inches and lowered the vent by 2 inches because I'm under 5 feet.’
    • ‘Quality extras include coconut buttons, a left chest pocket, double-needle stitching on the shoulders, and split side vents.’
    • ‘A camp shirt should have a clean-finished hem with side vents so it can be worn tucked out for a relaxed look or tucked in.’
    • ‘It's made from super 120's Italian wool and features a three-button closure, side vents and pickstitched lapels.’
    • ‘You should also look out for pockets, the lapel's style, and whether or not the overcoat has a vent in the back.’
    • ‘Crafted of a smooth cotton blend, it features a pointed collar, white pearlescent buttons, and a straight bottom hem with side vents.’

Origin

Late Middle English: alteration of dialect fent, from Old French fente slit, based on Latin findere cleave.

Pronunciation:

vent

/vɛnt/