Definition of venerable in English:

venerable

adjective

  • 1Accorded a great deal of respect, especially because of age, wisdom, or character.

    ‘a venerable statesman’
    • ‘The venerable Sir Walter Scott, who self-consciously wrote romances, criticized Jane Austen for not being romantic enough.’
    • ‘I wait to see whether an even more venerable Caledonian diver will now come forward.’
    • ‘It was a wonderful afternoon, all of us upstarts, edgy and feisty, garnering the imprimatur of the venerable professor.’
    • ‘The thought of making money at the expense of these venerable institutions was hugely tempting.’
    • ‘They don't have the venerable institutions and structures of the two big parties.’
    • ‘But when that venerable team melted into the sunset, normal service was resumed.’
    • ‘Perhaps the most venerable and prestigious general scientific journal in the world is Nature.’
    • ‘Sendmail is one of the most venerable internet software packages still in widespread use.’
    • ‘He was also acutely aware of being part a long and venerable exegetical tradition.’
    • ‘The venerable A-level celebrates its 54th birthday this year.’
    • ‘There is also a long and venerable family tradition of building and constructing.’
    • ‘The police are also rediscovering the benefits of some of our more venerable instruments.’
    • ‘This last factor will weigh particularly heavily with Egypt's Mubarak, now the venerable elder statesman of the Arab world.’
    • ‘All of these are venerable human institutions that we recently decided to change.’
    • ‘In fact, Eminem seems constitutionally incapable of partaking in hip-hop's most venerable traditions.’
    • ‘Eugene, you are from the venerable Catholic tradition, which of course has been around a long time.’
    • ‘Yes, I did that venerable one a favor; I did what nobody else would.’
    • ‘Rather than impose preconceived plans on a venerable company with a distinct culture, he's going to listen first.’
    respected, venerated, revered, reverenced, worshipped, honoured, esteemed, hallowed, august, distinguished, acclaimed, celebrated, lionized
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (in the Anglican Church) a title given to an archdeacon.
      • ‘The venerable abbot is himself a traitor, while Fan Dabei, the drunken beggar, turns out to be a warrior with a mission.’
      • ‘The nuptial ceremony was performed by the venerable archdeacon John Murray assisted by Dean Timothy O'Connor PP.’
      • ‘The venerable church father approached the Bible as if he were sitting down to a beautifully presented, sumptuous banquet feast.’
      • ‘Leading the charge against Graham was none other than Reinhold Niebuhr, the venerable professor at Union Theological Seminary in New York City.’
      • ‘For example, the venerable Everett Ferguson writes on ordination and the authority of the congregation in the early church.’
    2. 1.2 (in the Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a deceased person who has attained a certain degree of sanctity but has not been fully beatified or canonized.
      • ‘The first stage is where a person is declared a Servant of God, the next is where the Church declares a person venerable.’
      • ‘Lee Petty, the venerable patriarch, died on April 5 at age 86 of complications from a stomach aneurysm.’
      • ‘By then, the venerable Ron Newman had given way to former U.S. national team coach Bob Gansler, but the Wizards woes continued.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin venerabilis, from the verb venerari (see venerate).

Pronunciation

venerable

/ˈvɛn(ə)rəb(ə)l/