Definition of venerable in English:

venerable

adjective

  • 1Accorded a great deal of respect, especially because of age, wisdom, or character.

    ‘a venerable statesman’
    • ‘He was also acutely aware of being part a long and venerable exegetical tradition.’
    • ‘The venerable A-level celebrates its 54th birthday this year.’
    • ‘This last factor will weigh particularly heavily with Egypt's Mubarak, now the venerable elder statesman of the Arab world.’
    • ‘They don't have the venerable institutions and structures of the two big parties.’
    • ‘But when that venerable team melted into the sunset, normal service was resumed.’
    • ‘Yes, I did that venerable one a favor; I did what nobody else would.’
    • ‘There is also a long and venerable family tradition of building and constructing.’
    • ‘The police are also rediscovering the benefits of some of our more venerable instruments.’
    • ‘In fact, Eminem seems constitutionally incapable of partaking in hip-hop's most venerable traditions.’
    • ‘I wait to see whether an even more venerable Caledonian diver will now come forward.’
    • ‘Sendmail is one of the most venerable internet software packages still in widespread use.’
    • ‘The thought of making money at the expense of these venerable institutions was hugely tempting.’
    • ‘The venerable Sir Walter Scott, who self-consciously wrote romances, criticized Jane Austen for not being romantic enough.’
    • ‘Eugene, you are from the venerable Catholic tradition, which of course has been around a long time.’
    • ‘Perhaps the most venerable and prestigious general scientific journal in the world is Nature.’
    • ‘All of these are venerable human institutions that we recently decided to change.’
    • ‘Rather than impose preconceived plans on a venerable company with a distinct culture, he's going to listen first.’
    • ‘It was a wonderful afternoon, all of us upstarts, edgy and feisty, garnering the imprimatur of the venerable professor.’
    respected, venerated, revered, reverenced, worshipped, honoured, esteemed, hallowed, august, distinguished, acclaimed, celebrated, lionized
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (in the Anglican Church) a title given to an archdeacon.
      • ‘For example, the venerable Everett Ferguson writes on ordination and the authority of the congregation in the early church.’
      • ‘The venerable church father approached the Bible as if he were sitting down to a beautifully presented, sumptuous banquet feast.’
      • ‘The nuptial ceremony was performed by the venerable archdeacon John Murray assisted by Dean Timothy O'Connor PP.’
      • ‘The venerable abbot is himself a traitor, while Fan Dabei, the drunken beggar, turns out to be a warrior with a mission.’
      • ‘Leading the charge against Graham was none other than Reinhold Niebuhr, the venerable professor at Union Theological Seminary in New York City.’
    2. 1.2 (in the Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a deceased person who has attained a certain degree of sanctity but has not been fully beatified or canonized.
      • ‘The first stage is where a person is declared a Servant of God, the next is where the Church declares a person venerable.’
      • ‘By then, the venerable Ron Newman had given way to former U.S. national team coach Bob Gansler, but the Wizards woes continued.’
      • ‘Lee Petty, the venerable patriarch, died on April 5 at age 86 of complications from a stomach aneurysm.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin venerabilis, from the verb venerari (see venerate).

Pronunciation

venerable

/ˈvɛn(ə)rəb(ə)l/