Definition of veneer in English:

veneer

noun

  • 1A thin decorative covering of fine wood applied to a coarser wood or other material.

    ‘a fine-grained veneer’
    [mass noun] ‘the ceiling was of maple veneer’
    • ‘I originally asked for the quote on cherry wood veneer.’
    • ‘I did not want to simply apply a wood veneer, or a fake finish to the iPod.’
    • ‘Another example is masonry veneer over a steel or concrete frame.’
    • ‘Then, make your pencil lines and cut on the back of the panel to avoid splintering the veneer with your circular saw.’
    • ‘But the warped and peeling veneer suggested the heat and humidity might also have taken their toll.’
    • ‘Oval ones were gilded or made of pine with mahogany veneer.’
    • ‘All attached veneer walls have a cavity or air space behind them.’
    • ‘However, that code requires a vapor retarder for veneer walls designed in accordance with Section 1505.5.’
    • ‘Key design elements include cherry wood veneer cabinetry with granite stone flooring and countertops.’
    • ‘With a new blade in a utility knife, score the veneer front then back, flush with the stile on all edges; and bend it to complete the cut.’
    • ‘Complete your cabinet makeover by covering exposed sides and face frames with matching adhesive-backed veneers.’
    • ‘Where once there was walnut veneer on the floor, there is now proper stripped wood.’
    • ‘The units are made of plywood with a maple veneer, and are attached to the wall studs.’
    • ‘Much of today's furniture is made with a thin wood veneer over a core of particleboard, and this material also will rapidly absorb water.’
    • ‘As you work, remember the veneer next to the solid wood strips is very thin - less than 1/32 inch.’
    • ‘On the high-end are hardwood veneers and stain-grade solid wood doors with better hardware and excellent fittings.’
    • ‘These are used to bond veneers or to bond plastic laminates to wood for table tops and counters.’
    • ‘Other papers copy wood grain or use real wood veneers.’
    • ‘The illustrator chiseled pieces of maple veneer plywood to approximate his vision.’
    • ‘Walnut veneer panelling in the bathroom can come as a shock, but you soon get used to it.’
    cladding, skin, decorative layer, protective layer, surface, facade, front, fronting, false front, coating, covering, dressing, overlay, revetment, paving, lamination, inlay, plating
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A layer of wood used to make plywood.
      • ‘Some 874 cubic meters of the confiscated logs were meranti, a mahogany-like wood usually used for plywood and veneer.’
      • ‘Wood does make an appearance, though, as both exterior cladding and interior veneer, all in the same rich teak harvested from western China.’
    2. 1.2[in singular]An attractive appearance that covers or disguises someone or something's true nature or feelings.
      ‘her veneer of composure cracked a little’
      • ‘They really are quite a superstitious race once you strip their thin veneer of scientific polish away.’
      • ‘The hearings feature only enough heat and sufficient new details to give a veneer of credibility to the process.’
      • ‘In keeping with his character, Langer's hardness exists beneath a veneer of civility.’
      • ‘Think about the thin veneer of civilization for a moment, and ask yourself how you would respond to chaos.’
      • ‘When so much travel writing is given a veneer of objectivity, writers are faced with some disturbing questions.’
      • ‘Bit by bit, Faulkner peels away the shiny veneer that covers up the ugly realities of the turn-of-the-century South.’
      • ‘But when the girls go away on school camp, their veneers are slowly stripped away.’
      • ‘The wind strips the veneer off our psyches down to a tender layer of angst.’
      • ‘This story has taken on the image and the veneer of a fable and we are simply following the fable to its logical conclusion.’
      • ‘The veneer of civilisation that covers the beast within us is thin and can be damaged easily.’
      • ‘Then the vocals kick in, stripping the veneer of respectability and reminding anyone who they are listening to.’
      • ‘But underneath the veneer of civilisation are the realities of the war.’
      • ‘He's always been there, under the thin veneer of charm.’
      • ‘Well, I suppose one of us had to maintain a veneer of respectability.’
      • ‘To my astonishment, Beavers did not respond with the veneer of civility that usually masks his repugnance.’
      • ‘Noll's emotional involvement in the issue often surfaces from beneath a thin veneer of scholarly objectivity.’
      • ‘Karzai's claim to power has only the barest veneer of legitimacy.’
      • ‘Peel the veneer and there is much to write about.’
      • ‘Each assembly should have a broader peripheral " Civic Forum, " to give a veneer of popular legitimacy.’
      • ‘The U.S. will undoubtedly engineer a process to create a veneer of democratic legitimacy.’
  • 2Dentistry
    A crown in which the restoration is placed over the prepared surface of a natural crown.

    • ‘And we ended up doing crowns and veneers on her instead of doing the ortho, because I couldn't do the ortho.’
    • ‘Bleaching won't work on false teeth, crowns, veneers or fillings (including tooth-coloured fillings).’
    • ‘To resemble Pitt, the brothers undergo rhinoplasty, receive chin implants, and obtain porcelain veneers.’
    • ‘He received six crowns and 15 porcelain veneers.’
    • ‘Different types of restoration including fillings, crowns, veneers, inlays, onlays and root fillings.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Cover (something) with a decorative layer of fine wood.

    ‘a veneered cabinet’
    • ‘Hardwood veneered plywood, however, takes laser engraving very well.’
    • ‘The interior features a considerable amount of hardwood and veneered plywood for a very yacht-like look.’
    • ‘The frames were usually of pine or veneered with mahogany, birch, or elm.’
    • ‘If the dent is too deep, or the piece is gouged or veneered, you may be able to fill it with a burn-in stick.’
    • ‘Stylistically, the brilliantly veneered and inlaid case is most likely the work of John and Thomas Seymour of Boston.’
    • ‘Inside, my Superb wasn't so much veneered as wood-panelled, in the manner of libraries in Agatha Christie books.’
    • ‘Broad veneered surfaces, often in highly figured woods (primarily mahogany and rosewood), displaced carving as the decorative focal point.’
    • ‘Italy's sleekly veneered Uno still manages to turn heads.’
    • ‘Engineered wood floors are composites made from a wood - veneered surface, backed by a cheaper wood or plastic laminate.’
    • ‘To veneer the edges and faces: Cut the strips wide enough to cover the face and edge plus 1/2 inch.’
    • ‘Part 2 covers veneering the face frames and other work on the cases (cabinets).’
    • ‘Curved mahogany door cappings and waist rails with walnut veneered facings (a much coveted feature of older Bristols) make a return.’
    • ‘Many people use veneered wood to avoid this seasonal problem.’
    • ‘It is also unlikely that the top of the bureau will be veneered when hidden by a cupboard, though, admittedly, this is not always a rule.’
    • ‘It takes 350 just to veneer the facia and sew the upholstery.’
    • ‘A medium-priced stock cabinet door will have a raised panel that is veneered wood over particle board.’
    • ‘Cigar cases are handsome objects made of leather, silver, veneered wood and papier mache.’
    • ‘We used to do that - having games of backgammon or canasta on the veneered wooden cabinet after dinner.’
    • ‘Luminosity is enhanced by planes of the pale brick, and by using birch veneered panels on the inner walls of the galleries.’
    • ‘We have also found chests made of maple, poplar, or entirely veneered with mahogany.’
    1. 1.1Cover or disguise (someone or something's true nature) with an attractive appearance.
      ‘he exuded an air of toughness, lightly veneered by the impeccably tailored suit’
      • ‘Small talk and precious jokes veneer the sea of anxiety and anticipation that grips Dix - just one example of his ‘nervous’ energy.’
      • ‘His inspirations are the slickly veneered melodramas of the 1950s and '60s.’
      • ‘Whilst others try to veneer or pepper their works with Californian melodies, The Forest are purists and for that, much more original than their peers.’

Origin

Early 18th century (earlier as fineer): from German furni(e)ren, from Old French fournir furnish.

Pronunciation:

veneer

/vɪˈnɪə/