Definition of velocity in English:

velocity

noun

  • 1The speed of something in a given direction.

    ‘the velocities of the emitted particles’
    • ‘His average velocity on the fastball was ninety miles per hour on the button.’
    • ‘A rain droplet's readiness to fall and its fall velocity are not controlled by the density of the droplet, but by its size.’
    • ‘In 1660, together with Borelli, Viviani measured the velocity of sound by timing the difference between the flash and the sound of a cannon.’
    • ‘Wind shear velocities have been measured to 212 knots.’
    • ‘Roller coasters are also good demonstrators of speed, velocity, and acceleration.’
    • ‘Clearly, much depends on the direction and magnitude of the velocity and of the strength of the gravitational field.’
    • ‘Similarly, if two objects are moving with the same velocity, one with twice the mass of the other also has twice the momentum.’
    • ‘The two bodies will meet at a relative velocity of 10.3 kilometers per second.’
    • ‘Anti-matter has mass and when mass moves at a high velocity, there is an overall increase in energy.’
    • ‘He noticed Venus move, he was able to determine its direction and its velocity and very importantly he was able to determine its angular diameter.’
    • ‘Calculating the angular velocity of the Earth is a deceptively easy task.’
    • ‘Accelerometers measure changes in the velocity of the object to which they are attached.’
    • ‘The further away from the center of rotation that the torque is applied the more velocity it causes.’
    • ‘In many cases, air resistance will produce a drag force which is proportional to the velocity squared.’
    • ‘However, if we can measure the distance to the Sun we can also calculate the velocity of the Earth relative to the Sun.’
    • ‘It dealt only with a specific type of motion: objects moving at a constant velocity.’
    • ‘If an object is moving in one direction without a force acting on it, then it continues to move in that direction with a constant velocity.’
    • ‘Hubble discovered that the galaxies are moving away from us with a velocity proportional to their distance.’
    • ‘Since a change in either speed OR direction means a change in velocity, the object's velocity is not constant.’
    • ‘Maximum wind velocity reaches 20-25 m/s.’
    1. 1.1(in general use) speed.
      ‘the tank shot backwards at an incredible velocity’
      • ‘The bolt left the crossbow with amazing velocity, striking the target with near-perfect accuracy.’
      • ‘Having started his corporate career with maximum velocity, Yang now runs another company called Yahoo!’
      • ‘Medical advances aside, almost every technological progress has been about velocity, about the simple process of speeding things up.’
      • ‘The film has nail-biting stunts performed at such velocity you're pinned to the back of your chair just watching.’
      • ‘But you don't have to be a dot-com executive to see how the Internet accelerates business velocity.’
      • ‘A gauss rifle is a rifle that throws an iron slug at an incredibly high velocity.’
      • ‘Scientists and inventors are unraveling new technology at incredible velocity.’
      • ‘The velocity of change in today's economy requires a steady commitment to your fundamental values.’
    2. 1.2Economics
      The rate at which money changes hands within an economy.
      • ‘He assumed no international trade effects, an unchanged money supply and a constant velocity of circulation.’
      • ‘John Maynard Keynes challenged the theory in the 1930s, saying that increases in money supply lead to a decrease in the velocity of circulation and that real income, the flow of money to the factors of production, increased.’
      • ‘The trouble is that all these measures of money cannot be relied on because the velocity of money changes.’
      • ‘Time and money appear as commensurate albeit inverse values because of the effect of the velocity of circulation on the accumulation of capital.’
      • ‘The velocity of circulation was assumed to be unchanged.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French vélocité or Latin velocitas, from velox, veloc- swift.

Pronunciation:

velocity

/vɪˈlɒsɪti/