Definition of vaunt in English:

vaunt

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as adjective vaunted
  • Boast about or praise (something), especially excessively.

    ‘the much vaunted information superhighway’
    • ‘The book's dust jacket vaunts this as ‘a masterpiece of modern political biography, written by one of Britain's leading historians'.’
    • ‘Despite some good moments, her much vaunted collaboration with Jack White doesn't quite do it for me.’
    • ‘More than any other area of genetics, then, the beneficial possibilities of gene therapy have been much vaunted.’
    • ‘So much for the much vaunted transparency and accountability policy.’
    • ‘I think Howard's much vaunted political antennae may be well out of tune on this one.’
    • ‘The modern U.S. military is vaunted as an all-volunteer force, but the truth is more complex.’
    • ‘As a result, his much vaunted pacifism may have to undergo a rethink.’
    • ‘Celtic's much vaunted three-man back line was soon spread out and scared to death by Porto's four-pronged attack.’
    • ‘There are also few examples of her much vaunted genius.’
    • ‘Many of the books were written by wine merchants, often criticizing the practices of their colleagues, or vaunting their own specialities.’
    • ‘His much vaunted £3 billion investment in automated warehouses did nothing to help product availability.’
    • ‘It contrived to be both firmly capitalist and proudly working-class in character; hand in hand with big business but vaunting an anti-establishment stance.’
    • ‘Whoever wins the balloting will govern a country whose vaunted economic recovery is starting to fray.’
    • ‘The Barrowsiders would probably be satisfied to put up a good performance against this much vaunted Laois side.’
    • ‘In his first editorial, John Bird wrote: ‘We vaunt nothing beyond the determination that no effort be spared to make the journal a first-class family newspaper.’’
    • ‘For all of our much vaunted independence, scratch an American of Anglo descent and you'll find a bit of a Briton.’
    • ‘And the weather is playing havoc with the much vaunted weather forecasting system here.’
    • ‘The economy emerged yesterday as a key battleground in the British general election with Labour vaunting its financial competence while the opposition Conservatives promised hefty tax cuts.’
    • ‘On the contrary, it chose to launch the report with a massive media and public relations campaign vaunting the scope, credibility and prestige of the Commission and its authors.’
    • ‘Even the country's much vaunted success in the IT industry needs to be put in perspective, he says.’
    acclaim, esteem, revere, extol, celebrate
    View synonyms

noun

archaic

Origin

Late Middle English: the noun a shortening of obsolete avaunt ‘boasting, a boast’; the verb (originally in the sense ‘use boastful language’) from Old French vanter, from late Latin vantare, based on Latin vanus ‘vain, empty’.

Pronunciation

vaunt

/vɔːnt/