Definition of young in English:

young

adjective

  • 1Having lived or existed for only a short time.

    ‘a young girl’
    ‘the young are amazingly resilient’
    • ‘She tells a story of a young girl who lives in The House, where she works.’
    • ‘She was a young Jewish girl living in the Middle East under the rule of the Roman Empire.’
    • ‘As a young girl growing up in Trichy, Vanitha says she became interested in animation.’
    • ‘Her troubles, she insists, are now in the past, and the insecure young girl has grown into a confident woman.’
    • ‘A gaggle of young girls emerged from the woods and offered complex directions.’
    • ‘As a young girl living in Bellshill, she was taught the language on her grandmother's knee.’
    • ‘Lucy, who lives locally, says even as a young girl she felt alienated from her family - unloved and unwanted.’
    • ‘A long time ago a beautiful young girl called Hinemoa lived at Owhata on the eastern shores of the lake.’
    • ‘A young girl who lives in a cheap motel with her mother comes every year for her birthday meal.’
    • ‘Annie John is about a young girl growing up in Antigua and eventually being sent away to study.’
    • ‘Prince Unleashed tells the story of Holly, a young girl forced to live with relatives after a tragic family accident.’
    • ‘When she was a young girl growing up in Wolverhampton, Denise Lewis itched to become the new Diana Ross.’
    • ‘I came to live here in 1952 as a young girl and it would have pleased her greatly then.’
    • ‘A young girl loses her mother and has to go and live with her mad inventor father in Canada.’
    • ‘Gary Neat, who also lives in the quiet cul-de-sac, said the couple lived there with a young girl.’
    • ‘As a young girl growing up on the Isle of Wight, her dream was to work as a waitress at the upmarket Penguin Café in Ryde.’
    • ‘She says the country has been in her blood ever since she lived there as a young girl.’
    • ‘She explained that she had learned to do this when she was a young girl living in rural Ireland.’
    • ‘As a young girl, Mary lived in France where she had married the king of France - Francis II.’
    • ‘As a young girl, she lived on a farm and first rode sheep, then ponies and then horses which she loved.’
    youthful, juvenile
    young people, youths, children, boys and girls, youngsters, young ones, the younger generation, the next generation, juveniles, minors, schoolboys, schoolgirls, whippersnappers, striplings
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    1. 1.1 Not as old as the norm or as would be expected.
      ‘more people were dying young’
      youthful, juvenile
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2attributive Relating to, characteristic of, or consisting of young people.
      ‘young love’
      ‘a young authors' association’
      • ‘This was hardly the time to bring out an issue on love, when the young are busy preparing for exams.’
      • ‘My young artists loved making these flowers, as they looked great and were easy to make.’
      • ‘This picture of the two young lovers is the symbol of love in the SARS times.’
      • ‘There was no doubt that the young audience loved what they had just heard.’
      • ‘I love being round young writers, I like to think of writers as a community, as a race.’
    3. 1.3 Immature or inexperienced.
      ‘she's very young for her age’
      • ‘She seemed young for her age, had blonde hair, and wore heavy makeup.’
      • ‘They just seemed so immature and young to her now, even though they were only a few years younger.’
    4. 1.4 Having the qualities popularly associated with young people, such as enthusiasm and optimism.
      ‘all those who are young at heart’
      • ‘Extra care has been taken to present a frayed and worn out look sought by the young and young at heart.’
      • ‘Sr. Catherine paid tribute to all her Senior Citizens for being so young at heart.’
      • ‘It's full of non-stop action, laughter, drama and is perfect for the very young and young at heart.’
      • ‘The clientele is made up of all ages; safe to say, most will be young at heart.’
      • ‘The Bangalore crowd is all young at heart, and the people here are always out having fun, she thinks.’
      • ‘Anyone young at heart is welcome to attend this tea party and we hope to have music to suit the occasion.’
      • ‘He is still very young at heart and a lot of players through the years have learned from experience.’
      • ‘If you are young at heart you will remain young, it is said by many who don't want to grow old.’
      • ‘My friend will miss her; he told me she was young at heart, had a wicked sense of humour, and always had a twinkle in her eye.’
      • ‘For the young and young at heart, there's also a number of niteclubs to keep those dancing feet tapping.’
      • ‘A time when audiences full of the young and young at heart can embrace their innocence and enjoy the magic of theatre.’
      • ‘All young at heart were out on the floor dancing to the popular tunes of yesterday.’
      • ‘My elderly but young at heart parents just made their first visit to Pattaya from London to visit me in my new home.’
      • ‘If your dad is young at heart, you could check out the collection of shirts at River Island.’
    5. 1.5the Younger Used to denote the younger of two people of the same name.
      ‘Pitt the Younger’
    6. 1.6youngerScottish postpositive Denoting the heir of a landed commoner.
      ‘Hugh Magnus Macleod, younger of Macleod’

noun

  • treated as plural Offspring, especially of an animal before or soon after birth.

    ‘this species carries its young’
    • ‘Whooping crane young are fed dragonfly larvae, insects and tadpoles.’
    • ‘In the spring the hungry animals tear out birds nests and eat eggs and young.’
    • ‘Within three days of birth a brood of young may have been led a distance of almost a mile.’
    offspring, progeny, family, children, issue, little ones, youngsters, babies
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Phrases

  • with young

    • (of an animal) pregnant.

Origin

Old English g(e)ong, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch jong and German jung, also to youth; from an Indo-European root shared by Latin juvenis.

Pronunciation

young

/yəNG//jəŋ/